(Topic ID: 226920)

Power consumption of electro-mechanical era games?

By RyanClaytor

3 years ago



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  • 10 posts
  • 10 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 3 years ago by EMsInKC
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    #1 3 years ago

    Does anyone know the amperage/powerconsumption/current draw/wattage of electro-mechanical era games? I'm looking into a basement remodel and an electrician wants to know. My 1990 Whirlwind says 8 amps. Are the older ones the same?

    Thanks for your time,
    Ryan

    #2 3 years ago

    If I'm not mistaken, most games amperage peak at around 2-3 amps. So a 20A breaker can easily handle 6 or so games.

    #3 3 years ago

    I have found it to be 2-3 amps per game as well. The 8 amps on your Whirlwind seems high. Do you have LEDs in it?

    #4 3 years ago

    That's just whats written on the label. Real world metering will be, like others have said, 2 to 3A. 6 games per 20A (#12) 120V circuit will be just fine.

    #5 3 years ago

    I can't answer your specific question, but keep in mind that the worst case current draw is likely to be when the game is first powered on. It's called the inrush current and can be several times the normal current draw which may account for the 8 amps on the label vs the 2-3 amps observed. So if you're going to turn games on one at a time your worst case current will be much lower than if you have switched outlets (which I highly recommend BTW) to turn several games on simultaneously.

    /Mark

    #6 3 years ago

    6 machines on a 20a 5 machines on a 15 amp

    #7 3 years ago

    This thread from a few weeks ago will answer all of your questions.

    https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/what-size-breaker-would-suffice-for-5-6-modern-pins-

    #8 3 years ago
    Quoted from MarkG:

    I can't answer your specific question, but keep in mind that the worst case current draw is likely to be when the game is first powered on. It's called the inrush current and can be several times the normal current draw which may account for the 8 amps on the label vs the 2-3 amps observed. So if you're going to turn games on one at a time your worst case current will be much lower than if you have switched outlets (which I highly recommend BTW) to turn several games on simultaneously.
    /Mark

    Yeah, I have a kill switch on my electrical outlets circuit in plain sight but I don't use it to turn the games on/off. I turn them on individually for the reason you state.

    When I have a bunch of people over and the house is all lit up in most rooms and the 28 games will be lit up and many of them in simultaneous play, I've had the breakers break and the house go dark. So, before the party starts, what I do now is tape black electrical tape over the light switches anywhere in the house that is on the same circuit(s) as the pinballs, so guests know not to flip them on, and I light up the house using different circuits. Haven't had a problem since.

    #9 3 years ago
    Quoted from vanilla:

    Yeah, I have a kill switch on my electrical outlets circuit in plain sight but I don't use it to turn the games on/off. I turn them on individually for the reason you state.

    I worked at an arcade for a long time and turned all games on via breakers every day, never had any issues.

    #10 3 years ago

    I have 6 on a 15 amp circuit. They have all been played at the same time with no issues.

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