(Topic ID: 224209)

Polishing tools for metals.


By yellowghost

10 months ago



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  • 35 posts
  • 12 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 9 months ago by yellowghost
  • Topic is favorited by 17 Pinsiders

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    #1 10 months ago

    Would like to know what I need for polishing metal parts. I was at a local hardware store and they different kinds of buffers in all shapes and sizes. I think most of them were made of felt. A few made of rope. And many types of compounds.. packaged in the shape of a brick. Some were labelled fine..medium ...etc. Not sure where to begin.

    #2 10 months ago

    First, it depends on the metal and its condition.
    In Pinball, many pieces are Nickel Plated, Stainless Steel, etc.
    Once these are cleaned, one can buff the metal, but it wont replace plating, so what you buff will dull if the plating is gone, unless clear coated.
    Youll want at least a medium size motor, face mask, stitched and light stitched or half stitched Muslin wheels.
    Compounds are Brown - Course, to Green for High Polish....There is white or other colors mentioned for stainless, if you wish to try. Avoid Red at all costs.
    An Ultrasonic helps immensely.
    Harbor Freight is great for non professional, and they have a pack of wheels and rouge blister packed,
    along with affordable motors and Ultrasonic.
    Around $100-$150 for everything you need.

    #3 10 months ago

    Home Depot sells a compact buffer kit that fits on the end of a drill motor. Worked great on my rails and ramp. The other thing I did was put them in the dishwasher when I was done. But if you do that, be careful there is nothing but metal. Even welds will throw some rust

    #4 10 months ago

    Flitz works very well

    #5 10 months ago
    Quoted from wolfemaaan:

    Home Depot sells a compact buffer kit that fits on the end of a drill motor. Worked great on my rails and ramp. The other thing I did was put them in the dishwasher when I was done. But if you do that, be careful there is nothing but metal. Even welds will throw some rust

    Thanks. What department would that be located in? With the tools I reckon?

    #6 10 months ago

    Though strictly speaking not a buffing tool, a tumbler also helps a lot.

    #7 10 months ago
    Quoted from yellowghost:

    Thanks. What department would that be located in? With the tools I reckon?

    Hardware. I’m not a fan of Ryobi, but this kit works

    Here it is and these are the rails o polished

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    #8 10 months ago

    Oh, and this is before vs after

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    #9 10 months ago

    Before/after

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    #10 10 months ago
    Quoted from Davi:

    Before/after
    [quoted image][quoted image][quoted image]
    [quoted image]

    Dayyaum. What did you use? Those look better than new

    #11 10 months ago
    Quoted from wolfemaaan:

    Dayyaum. What did you use? Those look better than new

    Ingredients
    0.7 HP buffing machine.
    Saturn flap wheels to remove ball marks, surface issues.
    8" 1st stage cut wheel with black compound.
    8" 2nd stage wheel with green compound.
    8" 3rd stage with white compound.

    Lot of time. I mean LOT.
    Patience.
    Dust mask.
    Goggles.

    #12 10 months ago

    Lot of time ... How long did it take?

    #13 10 months ago

    Strongly depends of condition of original piece, but size is the biggest factor. For small parts, I would say 1-2 hours, for bigger parts, like ball guides, big metal ramps it takes 3-4 hours.

    #14 10 months ago

    Time well spent looking at those results, absolutely fantastic!

    #15 10 months ago
    Quoted from Davi:

    8" 1st stage cut wheel with black compound.
    8" 2nd stage wheel with green compound.
    8" 3rd stage with white compound.

    I thought that white comes before green for stainless? Please tell me I haven't been doing this backwards for years.

    #16 10 months ago
    Quoted from jsa:

    I thought that white comes before green for stainless?

    Green is final buffing on steel, White is polish finishing for s/steel.

    For small pieces I like to use the compounds with felt wheels on my Dremel.

    #17 10 months ago
    Quoted from jsa:

    I thought that white comes before green for stainless? Please tell me I haven't been doing this backwards for years.

    White is after green.

    #18 10 months ago

    Consider Everbrite Coating on Buffed pieces not in contact with Ball, to keep shine, if one has buffed off the nickel plating.

    #19 10 months ago
    Quoted from Davi:

    Before/after
    [quoted image][quoted image][quoted image]
    [quoted image]

    What tool did this? Awesome

    #20 10 months ago

    I used Flitz on these. Just rub for a couple seconds and wipe off.

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    #21 10 months ago

    To get a mirror shine, you need to look at the deepest scratches, and choose the right grit to remove enough metal to the scratch depth.
    Then you need to move up the grit ladder, as far as you are OK to go, before you can polish.

    You can skip the super fine sanding and go right to cutting tripoli, but if you cant hold perpendicular by hand, youll need a jig, to avoid fine waves.

    For flat objects, sometimes easier for some to anchor flat, and wrap emory in block of wood to ensure
    smoothness.

    Same as wood, just different paper.....The finer the grit, the less work on the wheel.

    #22 10 months ago
    Quoted from yellowghost:

    What tool did this? Awesome

    Post #11

    1 month later
    #23 9 months ago
    Quoted from Davi:

    White is after green.

    Bought the bullet and bought some compounds. Mine say white before green. Should I still use "white diamond "last?

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    #24 9 months ago
    Quoted from yellowghost:

    Bought the bullet and bought some compounds. Mine say white before green. Should I still use "white diamond "last?
    [quoted image]

    Usually white is polish finishing.
    However, white 'diamond' is for fast cutting on hard metals.
    "Made with fine abrasive powder that produces a final satin finish on chrome, stainless steel, carbon steel, brass, and aluminum. Also use to remove rust, scale and carbon deposits on metal surfaces."

    #25 9 months ago

    Try the order listed...green to finish, although personally, I have not tried Blue.

    Please avoid red (especially Chinese/overseas)....it can be toxic, and a pain to clean off.

    #26 9 months ago

    I noticed that using white after green seemed to go hazy again. So now I stop at green. This is piece that I've done so far. Do not own a " saturn flap" so the machine mark on the steel are still there.

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    #27 9 months ago

    Either using power tools or by hand with a rag. It makes things shine.

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    #28 9 months ago
    Quoted from yellowghost:

    I noticed that using white after green seemed to go hazy again. So now I stop at green. This is piece that I've done so far. Do not own a " saturn flap" so the machine mark on the steel are still there.
    [quoted image]

    What kind of mop do you have for green?

    #29 9 months ago
    Quoted from Davi:

    What kind of mop do you have for green?

    Not using a mop. Its a wheel thing that inserts into a corded drill. About 2 1/2" in diameter. About a inch thick. Should I use a different wheel for every color? The wheel just looks black now. The outlane trim did not turn out too good. I guess the scratches were too deep for the compounds

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    #30 9 months ago
    Quoted from yellowghost:

    Not using a mop. Its a wheel thing that inserts into a corded drill. About 2 1/2" in diameter. About a inch thick. Should I use a different wheel for every color? The wheel just looks black now. The outlane trim did not turn out too good. I guess the scratches were too deep for the compounds[quoted image]

    I use following sequence:
    1. Saturn wheels to remove scratches, ball marks. 120, 240, 320 grits.
    2. Sisal Wheel.
    3. Colour Stitch Buffing Wheel.
    3. 'G' Loose Fold Buffing Wheel.

    One wheel, one compound only, don't mix.

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    #31 9 months ago

    If a piece of metal does not have heavy scratches, but needs cutting, start with brown on stitched.
    The courser, gritted wheels are abrasive and used for deep scratches, pitting, etc, before getting to cutting and polishing compounds.
    One should use a different wheel, for each color.

    #32 9 months ago

    I start with actual sandpaper to get rid of deep scratches and work up in grit.

    3M green pad and metal polish get you somewhere after that. Finish up with a polish wheel or simply a rag and metal polish if you are not anal about a mirror finish.

    I said anal.

    #33 9 months ago
    Quoted from Davi:

    I use following sequence:
    1. Saturn wheels to remove scratches, ball marks. 120, 240, 320 grits.
    2. Sisal Wheel.
    3. Colour Stitch Buffing Wheel.
    3. 'G' Loose Fold Buffing Wheel.
    One wheel, one compound only, don't mix.[quoted image]

    So once you get to "sisle" wheel, you apply compound to that? Or compound only on last wheel? They look pretty clean.

    #34 9 months ago
    Quoted from yellowghost:

    So once you get to "sisle" wheel, you apply compound to that? Or compound only on last wheel? They look pretty clean.

    Yes, black for sisal, green for color stitch, white for last one.
    That pic is about brand new wheels.

    #35 9 months ago
    Quoted from Davi:

    Yes, black for sisal, green for color stitch, white for last one.
    That pic is about brand new wheels.

    Oh ok thanks

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