(Topic ID: 190693)

Pointy People Pin Ponderings - Homage to Marche and Kelley

By Pecos

7 years ago


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“Do you like or dislike Pointy People themed pinball machines?”

  • I like Pointy People! 64 votes
    86%
  • I couldn't care less. 3 votes
    4%
  • I dislike Pointy People. 7 votes
    9%

(74 votes)

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There are 168 posts in this topic. You are on page 4 of 4.
#151 53 days ago
Quoted from Mardi-Gras-Man:

Please write down their Serial-Numbers and publish them here.

PS - those Cards are embarrassing !

Next time I visit Pacific Pinball, I will ask in advance if I can see the machines and note their serial numbers.

The important thing is those games are safe with Pacific Pinball Museum. They take wonderful care of their games, those on the floor and those in climate conrolled storage.

#152 52 days ago
Quoted from OldHockeyGuy:

Next time I visit Pacific Pinball, I will ask in advance if I can see the machines and note their serial numbers.
The important thing is those games are safe with Pacific Pinball Museum. They take wonderful care of their games, those on the floor and those in climate conrolled storage.

Thanks OldHockeyGuy ... sounds good - but nevertheless a MUSEUM should take care of such Details as original Score-Cards - these Cards look more like "Kindergarden" than Museum.

I just posted this Picture in another Toppic and thought it could fit in this one too ... not exactly "pointy people" but close. The french Company "Martina" converted Gottlieb-Machines from the early 60ies from ca 1968 to 1971 - french Artist Jean Amiot did some terrific Artwork. Those Machine sare very rare.

https://pinside.com/pinball/machine/sub-marine/gallery/legacy

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#153 51 days ago

Pics of a restored Expressway at a past East Coast show ... Marche's pointy art at its finest IMO.

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#154 50 days ago

@dono, agreed that this is one of the best of the modern era of pinball art. Expressway combines a mixture of art styles, including cubism, op art, pop art, sci fi, futurism, film noir, and psychedelics in a fun machine. The plastics are more than geometric shapes. It was one of the last of this style, with Gulfstream, OXO, and Star Pool bringing up the last few games.

#155 49 days ago

Not Toppic-related but this being a Toppic dedicated to Artists I use this to say how sad it is that Dave Christensen died several months ago and almost no one seemed to notice ... accidentally I just saw this "small" Toppic created this month with just a few Posts from the same day and then Silence ... what a Shame ...

If the SELF-PROCLAIMED "greatest Pinball-Artist of all Time" Rothkrantz would pass, all Hell would break loose...
That's no Joke, he means it ... Taxman (God bless him!) and o-din were the first ones noticing that phrase on that Dudes' Homepage and reporting it on Pinside (see "The Pinball Visual Quiz Show" Posts #2698 and #2699).

Very sad indeed. No idea how the relationship between JKK and DC was - but there surely were been some similarities - both had to fight hard for their artwork and they were right to do so. JKK had to fight with the Bally-Executives and DC had to fight with "Disney-Dick" White who was afraid of Boobs.

Christian Marche must have had a good relationship with DC - I say there's no Question that it's Christian Marche on the Prototype-BG "La Vie Parisienne" done by DC ... this must have been DC's "Farewell" to CM when he went back home to France in late 78 oder early 79.

https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/mad-dog-dave-christensen-obituary#post-8166365

OldHockeyGuy - sorry but this ain't quit right - EXPRESSWAY surely wasn't one of the last pointy-designs by CM ... the Machine is from 71 and was probably designed one year before - so this was during the absolutely hey-day of the "contemporary Artwork" when even Gottlieb had some slightly psychedelic Machines.

Dono - thanks a lot for these damned good Pics ... I never saw an EXPRESSWAY personally ... since Single-Players were absolutely uncommon in Germany.
It's absolutely amazing how CM managed to put deep expression in some faces with just a few Lines.
I'm still fascinated, for example, about the Face-Expression from that Girl on Sea-Ray. Or that Woman near the Car-Trunk on Expressway. How he managed to do that with just a few Lines. CM was a Genius, no doubt about it !!!

It's unbelieveable. He really was a wonderful Artist and I'm getting more and more angry when People who haven't the slightest Idea about Art talk hateful about him. The same Guys turn nuts about "modern" Pinball-Artwork done by Photoshop-Wizards or 1990's-Guys like Rothkrantz .... anybody with just a little Experience could do that.
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Here's another Marche-Girl I like very much - from Bally's 1972 LITTLE JOE.

#156 46 days ago

Mardi-Gras-Man Let me leave for another time to debate whether the majority of cubist modern art work was produced by the time Expressway came out, because

Instead, I want to embrace and support your appreciation of the artwork of Dave Christensen. My sole pinball owned during most of my adult life is Bobby Orr's Power Play.20220706_163934 (resized).jpg20220706_163934 (resized).jpg

Christensen's lifelike image showing great detail of Orr's equipment and action leaps out from the backglass onto the playing field. Christensen uses vivid reds, blues, whites and metallic borders to make the game seem larger than life. Other Christensen games which appeal to me include: Captain Fantastic and the Brown Dirt Cowboy , Old Chicago , Fireball and The Six Million Dollar Man

Christensen was also fond of the beauty of slot machines. He published his own book, with a forward by noted historian Richard M. Bueschel. 20240602_143529 (resized).jpg20240602_143529 (resized).jpg Bueschel wrote in the forward that Christensen was more artist than historian, but he clearly appreciated the array of significant slot machines drawn in black-and-white line drawings in the book.

Unfortunately, although Christensen included a drawing of the frontier-setting 1964 Bally "Money Honey" game, his description of the game did not include that the iconic design for the game was created by Jerry K. Kelley. Bueschel credits Kelley, including pictures, with the design of Money Honey in both his own book and article on the Bally roll-out of the slot. Bally company histories also conveniently omit giving Kelley credit for the slot design which transformed the industry and, without the hand pull lever, is basically the design still used today in casinos.

Christensen has a book on his artwork titled "Mad Dog and His Art- Illustrated Book about Dave Christensen." It is now out-of-print and hard to find, but it goes through all of the games for which he did artwork and also referenced his slot and other arcade game work. I'd like to see what was written on the non-pinball games and machines.

Christensen made fine contributions to what I call "Bawdy Pinball." Others have written on that, so I won't include that here.

Finally, Past Times Arcade in Girard, Ohio has banners for many of the pioneers of pinball, and Dave Christensen is honored by this one:20240308_175802 (resized).jpg20240308_175802 (resized).jpg

#157 46 days ago

There is an alleged dark side to Dave Christensen having to do with his political views, but I'm not getting into that. He did good pinball artwork. This is Pinside. Others can explore those areas.

#158 42 days ago

In this Post I want to write down everything JKK told about his thoughts on Pinball-Cabinets and Pinball-Artwork in general...

As noticed above, my main Interest during the Conversations via Telephone in late 1999 and early 2000 was about his own-designed Machines for Williams and Bally.
So surely I forgot or missed a lot of interesting Questions and the only Excuse therefore is that he wanted to publish a Book which already was in Progress regarding all of his Work for the Amusement-Industry, where every Detail would be described exactly.

I avoided, especially during that Telephone-Call, to interrupt him just because I conidered this "unfriendly" or "disregardful". Especially during that Conversation the "Telephone-Quality" wasn't that good too.

Fact is he already was involved in the Industry and had several Contacts way before he had his first sensational Success with the new Slot-Machine-Design which made Bally the #1 in the Slot-Business- a Design which still is up-to-Date right now.

It' s very complicated and maybe it's far too late to find out precisely which Designs were from him in Person, for which other Designs he made some sort of Blueprint or Template or whatever. Sometime he mentioned "I" and sometimes "We" but again, because he talked about his Book several Times, I avoided interrupting him from talking. Eveything he designed should have been described there in that Book.

He loved Pinball already in the early 50ies and liked talking to Pinball-People and Players and, from ca 1956 onwards, when the so-called Space Age began, decided that it's Time for a new Pinball-Cabinet and another Style of Artwork.

In the 2nd Half of the 50ies the Pinball-Industry didn't do that well. Gottlieb and Williams were the only 2 remaining Companies producing Machines on a regular Basis since Bally stopped developing Flipper-Games in 1957. The other Competitors stopped already earlier.

The Problem was that there just wasn't enough Money for developing an all-new contemporary Cabinet, because the Machines had low Production-Numbers and did not make lots of Money. This was for example a Reason to use Metal-Legs from late 1956 on because Metal was cheaper than Wood. JKK already had Contact with the Industry back then.

Another Problem was that there was no significant Difference between a Machine from 1948 to one from 1958 ... only real Fans could tell when a Machine was new, but the average Player couldn't and didn't notice. The Cabinet-Artwork on any Machine looked still like it was done in the 30ies, the Backglasses and Playboards seemed to use always the same Colors, and after all everything got boring and nothing was new. If you stood several Feet beyond the Machines they just looked the same over and over.

He said there was a Point in Time, around 1956-57, when People just got tired of all that Pre-War-Design. There just came a Time when People were sick of that roundly Cars with those 100s of different Lines and Ornaments - it was Time for a completely new Car-Design where the Eye could rest and take a Breath ... the People started to love clear and few, sharp-edged Designs. Same goes for Furniture and Houses. Most People couldn't stand the old Designs any longer and loved simple, clear Designs.

In 1959 the Space-Age seemed to be everywhere, but not in Pinball. So he was the One talking the Pinball-Industry into the Space-Age. It was the only way that all People, and not just the Fans, could see that there was a new Machine. So he defintely was involved in the Development of the new "Metal-Rail"-Aera for Pinball, which, like his Slot-Machine-Design for Bally, is still right on Top even today with just a few Differences.

I got no Idea, see above, if he just gave some Hints or Templates to Others or whatever, but there is no Question that JKK was a driving Force behind the new Pinball-Cabinets from 1960.
Regarding the Williams 1960-Cabinet he told that it wasn't a Success because it was too much over the Top. It may have looked well but just was not practical, which became clear after some Months. First, the Players couldn't nudge the Machine as they were used to because of the tubular Legs and the Fins too, but also because some hurted their Legs and it also was reported that small Children tried to play standing on the lower Cabinet-Front and fell down. After all was said and done it looked nice in a Art-Exhibtion but not useful in Practice. So this Cabinet-Design was very short-lived and no Success, was re-designed, all the Fins were taken off, standard Legs were fitted but the Cabinet itself remained the same. The very "basic" or "simple" Cabinet-Artwork on those Machines was of course done by Purpose and it stayed so - this way People could immediately recognize that there was something real new and not something overloaded out of the 30ies or 40ies.

He also told that especially european Distributors weren't happy with the extremely huge Back-Boxes which did not fit into european Station-Wagons which were a lot smaller than american ones. So this had to be changed too and the Williams-Back-Boxes got a new and even nicer Design with that cool "Frame within the Frame".
Sadly I also forgot asking him about the 1960-Gottlieb-Cabinet-Design. It was presented at the same Time as the 1st new Williams-Cabinet so it's hard to tell who was first. But since he talked about "the Industry" in general and not especially of Williams it rather seems that he was involved in every Pinball-Cabinet-Design from those years.
He also was at least involved in any Bally-Cabinet of the 60ies and especially the new 1967-Cabinet with the Lift-Up-Frame, black Legs, black Front-Doors and even black Back-Box-Doors ... all of this was his very own Idea and Design.

When Gottlieb enhanced the Heighth of the Backboxes in late 1966, making them ca. that huge like the Williams-Boxes from 1960, there were no more Complaints from the german Distributors ... the german Station-Wagons from the mid-Sixties were much larger than those of the late 50ies.
Sadly I also forgot to ask if it was him who designed the new Frame around the Backglass for Williams in late 1968 (first used on Cabaret) - this may have been Williams' Answer to Gottlieb's new huge Backbox with its larger Backglass. This Frame allowed a much larger Backglass (in Width and Height) without a complete new Back-Box-Design because the Box itself stayed the same - it was just the new Frame which allowed a larger Backglass. Bally followed this 5 years later when they presented their all-new Cabinet, replacing JKK's own Lift-Up-Frame Cabinet.

Indeed the 1960 Gottlieb-Top looks quite similar to Williams' with the only major Difference that the Williams-Top was a few Inches higher. The Front of the new 1960 Gottlieb-Multi-Player-Cabinet also shows a V-Shape, pointing quite in the other Direction than the Williams-Design, with that awesome big Lockbar including the Plunger.
The Front of these Gottlieb's always reminded me of a raging Bull or better a Dogie ready to attack. I guess it's possible that this was a JKK-Design too because he liked Dogies and it was his Idea to create a Dogies-themed Machine together with Ted Zale in 1967, as written some Posts earlier. But that's of course just my personal Opinion and doesn't really belong here.

It's still unclear therefore if he was in Charge for the 1963-1964 Gottlieb Low-Charger-Cabinet (exclusively for Multi-Players) which looked even more powerful and stunning as the 1960-Models, keeping that cool Lockbar. But he surely designed the 1965-1966 Williams Low-Charger-Cabinet including the "Cyclope-Front-Door". Sadly this Cabinet was in Production just less than 2 years. Not because Players did not like it, in contrary, but Distributors moaned that the Cabinets, when in Storage and standing up, could easlily tilt and fall down. They were also unhappy with the Single-Chute for 3 different sorts of Coins because it could happen that, if 1 Coin got stuck, the whole mechanism went off and the Machine couldn't take Money and was inactive. So Williams was forced to change that immediately and offered 3 different Chutes as the Germans were used to in a new Coin-Door, which was in Production until 1984.
So from 1966 on Bally, Willams and CDI offered Triple-Chutes, Gottlieb followed in late 1966. This Subject may have been less interesting in the States where Single-Chutes were common, but it was a big Issue for the important german Market.

Being a Pinball-Player himself it was also his Idea to use Nylon-Buttons on Williams-Cabinets and his 1967-Bally-Cabinet-Frame was specially designed for that new-style Flipper-Buttons that still are used today. No Idea if those new-style Buttons were his own Design or not but it was definitely him who brought them to Pinball. That alone should be a Reason why any Pinhead of today should be grateful to JKK.

Sadly there ain't much to say about CDI, except for the Fact that I asked him if he designed the Aprons with the new pointy CDI-Logos (for example on Festival and even a more contemporary one for Hi-Score-Pool) and this was the Case. It's possible that he also designed the Cabinets for CDI, at least he designed the Cabinet for a Driving-Game, see below.
He stated that he also designed several Lockbars for his Cabinet-Designs and if you keep in Mind that Chicago Coin became Stern in 1976 and, as far as I can see, the Lockbars on today's Stern-Machines seem to be the same as the one introduced with PLAY TIME in late 1968, it's quite possible that there still is a JKK-Part on today's Machines to find.

One of the last Designs for the Industry he did or at least was involved in was the Cabinet for a Driving-Game for Chicago Coin in ca 1970 - I guess this was Speedway along with some Rifle-Game-Cabinets for Williams.
In General one clearly can see that the "V-Shape" was his Trademark - you can see it on his Pinball-Cabinet-Designs, his Slot-Machines, his Pinball-Artwork, the still famous Williams "W", just everywhere.
Maybe he even designed the Metal-Legs, who knows - at least they have a "V-Shape" too ... another Designer maybe would just have designed a "square Top" of the Leg.

Going back to 1959 - as mentioned above he himself was a Pinball-Player and liked talking with other Players and finding out their Opinions. Almost everyone shared his Point of View that the Machines looked far too old-fashioned, especially when they stood next to a modern Juke-Box. He started designing Cabinet-Artwork in late 1959 for the new Pinball- and Bowling-Alley-Cabinets (that he designed or at least co-designed). The simple and basic Lines for the Artwork for "Styling of the 60ies"-Machines were meant to be, because everyone could/should see even from a Distance that this was something new and nothing from the 40ies.

It was when he designed those Cabinet-Artwork in the early 60ies when some Trouble with the Managements started. Most of them demanded the Colors Red and Blue on a white Cabinet.
He did not like that at all - of course not because he did not like the American Colors like some Dumbnuts once wrote, but just because it was too much of a Clichee. He designed for example a Design for an early Bally-Machine in 1963 with blue and purple Colors. At least some Sample-Machines got that Artwork but the Serial-Run got another Design in White-Red-Blue. Some years later some Details of this Artwork appeared on a Gottlieb-Machine.

This Machine was 3-In-Line and the Gottlieb-Machine was Dodge City. Years later there appeared a 3-In-Line in Germany with a different Cabinet-Artwork which indeed reminded of Dodge City. I knew the Owner of this 3-In-Line and looked very carefully at the Artwork. It was original, no doubt about it. This surely was the Case he mentioned. Nobody seemed to know anything about 2 different Cabinet-Artworks for 3-In-Line at that Point in Time.
During the Conversation I avoided to interrupt him and later I forgot asking more about this. He must have done a lot of Cabinet-Artwork during that Time for lots of different Types of Machines.
Maybe he sold them to other Companies, maybe he did them in their Demand, no Idea. This all should have been written down in his Book. I asked him just about a few Machines and he confirmed Williams' Jumping Jack's, Mardi Gras, "Whoopee" , 8 Ball and Shangri-La (This being the last Cabinet-Design for Williams). Merry Widow and Big Chief were not designed by him.

Since lots of People liked his contemporary Cabinet-Art Williams finally decided to give him free Hand for a complete Artwork-Package. This was the Time when his Slot-Machine-Design hit the Market and he became famous within the whole Industry. Williams first suggested some Casino-Theme but he got along well with them so his Idea was accepted immediately.
This was Pot'o'Gold of course and the Reason to choose an Underwater-Theme was that this allowed to depict Figures in pointy Poses without "confusing" the Player toomuch, for a Start. Same goes for Dancing and Space-Themes - good Possibillities to depict Figures with "strange" Movements.

He told this several Times to lots of People and maybe this was the Reason why so many People still were sure in 1999 that he designed Bally's Mariner from 1971 which was not true.
At least the upcoming Generation loved Pot'o'Gold. It wasn't yet a Super-Seller like A-Go-Go and Capersville should become but it convinced Williams
that it was the right Move.

So after the new Cabinet-Style was common in the early 60ies the next Point was the Artwork. JKK often went to Bars and Clubs, talking to "the Man from the Street" as well as to other Artists and Designers. An interesting Point was that several young Folks stated that especially the Bally-Machines from 1963 to 1966 all looked like from a Doris Day - Rock Hudson-Movie, which was a funny Statement.
After the so-called "British Invasion" changed Music and Outfit of the Pre-Teens and early Teenagers that upgrowing Generation considered Pinball a Greaser's Game.
He heard that several Times so he tried to convince the Industry that now, after the new Cabinet-Design was a huge Step forward and helped Pinball a lot to become more popular and up-to-Date, now it was Time for some new and fresh Artwork-Style.
When he looked for Example at a Row of Bally-Machines in Mid-1966 from a Distance of 15 or 20 Feet all he saw were white Cabinets with no Artwork at the Front and the same red Artwork on the Backbox-Fronts combined with a Mishmash of lots of Yellow, Blue and Red on the Backglasses. It wasn't that easy to recognize, from a Distance, which of those Games were new and which were 2 years old.
He was convinced that each Machine should have its very own Color-Combination so everyone should notice, already from a 30 or 40- Foot Distance, that there was something new and different. So from early on he decided that each of his own Pinball-Designs had to have its own distinctive Color-Speech ... and so it came, but he had to fight very hard for it - see the Story of Capersville above for Example.

Step for Step the Managements agreed that he was right, and in 1968 he wanted to realize his Dream of an All-Black Machine, COSMOS. But though the Test-Samples did well, the Bally-Executives in general and "Mister Mouth" especially stopped it and wanted Cosmos to have a white Cabinet. That was very disappointig for him and the Start of the Point when he lost the Interest working for the Industry because he could not stand those greedy Managers without any Feeling for Art any longer.
The Artwork for COSMOS was less spectacular, and this was done on Purpose too. He wanted a quiet, peaceful Theme, because the black Cabinet combined with some Space-War-Theme or a Space-Ship with thousands of Buttons and different Lamps would have been some sort of Overkill. People should have been attracted by the Cabinet first and then realize the (for its Time) fast Play-Appeal, and that was that.

Almost exactly 10 years later Williams celebrated a sensational Triumph with FLASH, the first black Machine since the 50ies, and he could tell everyone "I told you so" - but after some Time each and every Machine was All-Black and the same thing happened again - when you stood 40 Feet away from a Row of late-80ies-Machines they all looked the same too, like 25 years before. All of them had a black Cabinet and "damped" or "soft" Colors on the Glass and all you saw from some Distance was a Mishmash of lots of Black with some blurred Red, Brown and Yellow in it.
That wasn't the "golden Fleece" for him too so he liked BAD CATS for Example, because it was one of just a few refreshing Exceptions from that "new Color-Dogma".
But with the Introduction of the WPC-Generation it got better again and he liked fresh-looking Machines like FISH-TALES for Example
I asked him also about his Thoughts on the contemporary Machines from the late 90's, and he liked them way better than those from 10 years before. He was very well informed and visited the EXPO's - so he knew BIG BANG BAR and other Designs by Stan Fukuoka and liked them very much. He also liked the Game Plan-Machines, especially the 2nd Generation from 1985.
This goes also for Stern's Games from ca 1979 to 1981 ... some of them were "flirting with Disaster" - you don't know what happens to the poor Guy from Wild Fyre, falling down to Earth or the Guy from Trident struggled by the Octopus - do they get killed or will they survive?
That's the Point on Gator / Alligator or Dogies - is the Cowboy falling down and gets killed by the rampaging Dogies, will the Alligator eat the Couple or can they escape him?
That's OK and Pinball isn't made for small Kids - it's a Toy for Grown-Ups for him and I absolutely agree and love that. Right now in the Discussion again, see the John Wick-Toppics regarding the Guns.

Here comes to Mind it's ironic and "funny" that JKK did not accept Bally's Proposal in 1969 to get Senior-Designer. Though they had lots of Differences with him, at least the Top-Management wanted him to stay. Keep in Mind that JKK rocketed Bally to Number-1 in the Slot-Machine-Market. He refused because he knew it could not work out, especially because the new Management under Sam Stern, who became the new Bally-President for just 1 year, was determined to "save" Bally because the Pinball-Machines,
though selling well, did not earn enough Money. So it was clear that the new Bally-Machines for 1969-1970 had to be "cheap" and JKK wouldn't do that.
So he refused the Offering and the next Bally Senior-Designer became "Disney-Dick" who did some of the most childish Artwork-Packages ever. Very odd!
Imagine JKK as Senior-Designer working together with Dave Christensen !!! It's very sad - I guess they would have designed sensational Artwork-Packages, a Dream!

To finish this Post - Imagine the 1969-Chicago Coin-Lockbar was maybe indeed a JKK-Design - it's possible. And keep in Mind that the Flipper-Buttons used today still are the same Type that he introduced in 1967 (just that the Buttons today are a bit "longer" - like Williams used them since late 1978) ... as told above, I have no Idea if JKK designed them himself or if he just brought them to Pinball ... but nevertheless it was his Idea.
If so, it's very interesting that at least 1 out of the 2 "Things" that all Players touch the most on today's Stern-Machines, the Lock-Bar and the Flipper-Buttons, are Kelley-Stuff.
This means he's still present in Pinball, and don't forget the ever popular and cherished Williams "W"you can still spot everywhere.

-----

OldHockeyGuy - You got me wrong, the Question wasn't the Point "when" the Heydey of the contemporary Artwork was but if "Expressway was" one of the last pointy Designs by CM - it wasn't !
it just was one of his last pointy Designs for Bally, only followed-up by LITTLE JOE and BALI-HI which didn't reach Serial-Production. He also did VERY HOT PANTS for Bally but it never was produced, instead WILLIAMS took it over and it became FUN-FEST ... maybe "Disney-Dick" was afraid the Theme could be "too adult", who knows... But there still were a lot of Williams-Machines following Expressway - like Stardust, Winner, Fan-Tas-Tic, Summer/Travel-Time, Fun Fest/Swinger, Tropic Fun/Gulfstream, Jubllee/Darling, then followed by OXO and finally Star Pool.

And please do not forget his Designs for CDI after 1971 - Hee-Haw and Casino - put together, these are more than 10 pointy Designs following Expressway, so this wasn't one of his last pointy Designs for sure.

And don't get me wrong please - this ain't an Offence by no means !!! I appreciate it that there still are some nice Guys fighting for JKK and CM. But since none of us is getting any younger and the holy Millenials, Zoomers or how the F*** they call themselves couldn't care less, it's our Duty to put even the smallest Details right. Maybe and hopefully there will be another Generation of Pinheads in 30 or 50 years that discovers again how wonderful these Machines were and will love them just the way they were meant to be - and not transferring them into Video-Pins and powdercoatered Rainbow-Puke-Zombies.
If we don't take every Detail damned serious and talk about it right now on Pinside, the ultimate Pinball-Source, this knowledge would be lost forever. And that's exactly the reason why I write all this important stuff down here and now. Not to show off, not to say "It takes a smart-ass-German like me to let you know all this" - Bullshit - it's just because I love Pinball ever since, grew-up with it, (see above) and that's it. I give a Shit about being german and even more Shit about Soccer. The archetypical brave German knows all about Soccer but me I'm proud to say that I can tell immediately each and every Pinball-Machine manufactured from 1960 onwards including the Designers (as far as known of course).

This being said I will close this Post with a Sentence from my All-Time-Hero Steve McQueen "The Majority is always wrong" (---> An Enemy of the People)

----

#159 40 days ago

Fantastic, emotive communication. So much to absorb.

#160 35 days ago

Here's the next Conversation which took some Time and even more Money (Phone-Calls to the USA weren't cheap then) but was also very interesting . I asked him if he ever regretted having left Bally and, following that, there came the Point of the Pinball-Crisis which began very slowly already in late 1968 and reached it's Peak (or Low, however you like to name it) in 1970 - both Subjects belong together.

So it's better to start with that Crisis which had its Origins in Germany. Therefore please note---> as stated before I'm no selfish German who thinks "we" are the Best, "we" are the most Important and the Smartest, but - if you like it or not - it's an undeniable Fact that Germany was a very important Market in the 60ies and early 70ies when Pinball was illiegal in many Parts of the USA ... and especially for Bally Germany was even the most important Market.

First you must know that the german Scene back then consisted of ca 4500 Operators, most of them were 1-Man-Companies, a lot of them were disabled War-Veterans who couldn't do a "proper" work anylonger. Most of them had some 20 to 50 Pinball-Machines. Unlike today where, like in any other Business too, some greedy Juggernauts dominate everything.

The "Backbone" of the german Business was the so-called "Geldspielgerät", some sort of very harmless, wall-mounted Slot-Machine where you could win some little Money. These Machines could be found in almost any "Wirtshaus", were 2 of them where allowed, and of course in the Arcades (called "Spiel-Halle") where 3 were allowed. In 1968 the Government decided to allow a new Price of 20 Pfennig (I guess at that point in Time the Relation of Dollar to DeutschMark was 1:3) instead of 10 Pfennig for each Game, which allowed a double Income overnight. (One Game of Pinball at this Time in Germany did cost 20 Pfennig and 3-Balls-per-Game were common since 1966 over here). Those new Machines also offered some new Features which made them more interesting - the Players went crazy and demanded them everywhere.

*****

Americans of course must know a little about pricing over here ... Pinball-Machines were very expensive in the 60ies in Germany. As mentioned above, the Relation Dollar to Deutschmark was ca 1 to 3 in the late 60ies ... a new Pinball-Machine in the 2nd half of the 60ies did cost around 5000 Deutschmark includig Taxes, a lot of Money. For Comparison - an Opel Kadett-B, the typical Car for the german "Man from the Street" alongside with the Beetle (which slowly declined in Popularity) did cost 6000,- to 7000,- (a Beetle ca 5000,- to 5500,- Deutschmark) ... Stationwagons prefered by german Pinball-Operators like Opel Rekord CarAVan and Ford 17M Turnier did cost about 8000,-. You see, a new Pinball-Machine surely was some sort of Investment for a German.
(Only 10 years later Things were completely different - the Relation Dollar to Deutschmark was reduced to 1:2 ... a new Pinball-Machine in 1978 was even slightly cheaper than 10 years before and the average price Germans did spend for a new Car arose to 16.000 Deutschmark. Plus one 3-Ball-Game in 1978 did cost 50 Pfennig ... in 1968 you got 3 Games for 50 Pfennig and 1 for 20 Pfennig... in early 1980 when Gorgar hit the Market, the price went even higher to one 3-Ball-Game for 1 Deutschmark, 3 Games for 2 Deutschmark and then again 10 Games for 5 Deutschmark ).
It's also worth to know that 60ies-Machines were in Use 8 years or even longer ... whereas for example an early electronic Bally with Chimes was absolutely obsolete already in 1981. It's very strange that those "real" early Electronics like Night Rider are "thrown into the same Pot" as for Example a Flash Gordon by today's Collectors, all called "Early Electronics" which is Bullshit. Germans in that time categorized speaking Machines like Gorgar already even as "the 3rd electronic Generation" and Double-Level-Machines like Black Knight as the 4th .... In 1981 these were 2 different Worlds. It's ridiculous and laughable reading Stuff describing a Black Knight an "early Electronic".
In the mid-80ies the Dollar went extremely high and the Machines became very expensive. Then in the 90ies Prices became very moderate again ...
the WPC-Machines were relatively cheap for ca 5000,- to 6000,- Deutschmark including Taxes. A highly-frequented Terminator 2 for example could pay his Rent in a few Weeks. I guess they really were much too cheap in the 90ies ... late Models like wonderful Champoin Pub with sadly low Production-Runs were far too cheap and did not even pay back their Production-Costs and we all know what happened then. Very very sad indeed.

*****

Now Back -
And because most of the german Operators were rather small Companies without that much Money or Fortune in the Background all of them focused in buying new "Geldspielgeräte" instead of Pinball-Machines. This did not mean, never of course, that Pinball declined in Popularity, it's just that they used their Pinball-Machines longer and had to rotate them more often. Several 100.000's of "Geldspiel-Geräten" were operated then, and the majority of the "old" 10-Pfennig-Machines were replaced in just 1 year, as fast as they could, with the new 20-Pfennig-Machines.

This explains why the german Pinball-Market sacked down dramatically from late 1968 on. And it should stay that Way until 1971 because...
In 1969 there came another Problem for Pinball in Germany, because the Pool-Billard-Boom started. Don't ask me why, I have absolutely no Idea why it took until 1969 to make the Germans Pool-crazy but that's the way it was. Those Tables were very expensive and more and more Customers demanded a Pool-Table in their "german Wirtshaus" - and again the Pinball-Sales dropped just because the Money was spent on Pool-Tables.

I was eight years old in 1970 and we had a 1966 Williams 8 Ball in 1968-69. It was very popular, made Money like Hell and was played to Death in 1 year. Being just a dumb Kid by then I was sure that it was Williams' 8 Ball who made Pool-Tables so popular. My Family even considered a Pool-Table for our Game-Room but luckily enough the Room was too small therefore ... but there was a great Danger to lose the Pinball-Machines - absolutely terrible.

Gottlieb and Bally sold far less Machines in Germany in 1969 and even more less in 1970 when the Pool-Craze reached its Heighth. Williams did not suffer that much because Hans Rosenzweig, the very clever Boss of "Seevend" (which imported Williams and Chicago Coin) offered special Packages including Pool-Tables, "Geldspielgeräte" and of course Pinball-Machines for relative low Package-Prices. That's why 1969 to 1971 were the so-called "Williams-Years" in Germany - they returned in 1979 with Flash and Gorgar.
And except for the Period from mid-1981 until mid-1985 when Bally dominated once more, Williams took over again when Comet was released and of course stayed there until 1999... That's the german Part of this Story.
Gottlieb did not suffer that much because they absolutely dominated France with their own french Company "Mondial" but they were outsold by Williams in these years for the first Time.

Bally had another Problem anyway, because their Machines were too expensive to produce. They sold well but did not make much Money. Sam Stern was asked to be the Savior and took over the Bally-Management for ca 1 year. This also was the Point when Bally was transferred from a Company to a Corporation, when JKK's Designs Joker, Cosmos and Alligator/Gator were produced or designed. Costs had to be saved, and Features like the popular "Extra-Bonus"-Score-Reels disappeared.

JKK told this regarding these Issues ... Bally offered him the Job as Senior-Designer but he refused. Not only he was sure that he still would he hassled and criticised by certain People who had no Interest in Art and Design but only in Money but also because of the urgent need to save money too.
It became evident that Bally tried to save Costs whereever they just could.
They began to use cheap Flippers without Letters for example. The Vaults were searched through over and over to use "NOS"-Parts and they found these old letterless Flippers and put them on Joker and Alligator/Gator ... originally he wanted to use green Flippers on these, but the orange, letterless ones were not all that bad because that color matched at least with the Mouths of the Gators.
The very solid Cabinets from then on were manufactured out of cheaper sorts of Wood and lost Weight, the Metal-Frame used cheaper Materials and so on.

What he found annoying too was the Fact that those Execs who made a Fuzz out of each and every Penny on one side threw Tons of Money out of the Window on their annual Business-Parties on another side. The Williams and Bally - Business-Parties in Night-Clubs and expensive Hotels were legendary.

I asked him if he had any Idea why Gottlieb used some Trim from Woodrail-Machines on Machines like Four Seasons and College Queens and he told that
at this Point in Time all Manufacturers tried desperately to save Money wherever they could. By sure someone found some Boxes somewhere in some Vault containing these old Woodrail-Parts for the Front of the Top. So this surely was the Case.

After he left Bally for good he still had his Contacts of course and he knew for sure that Bally planned to close down the Pinball-Division in 1971 and this would surely have happened if Four Million B.C. wouldn't have become such a Success. They shut it down in early 1958 and started all over again in early 1963, it would have been no big Deal at all closing it down a 2nd Time in 1971 without a Fuzz.

I also asked him about his thoughts about these "very strange" Colors that were used from late 1969 until early 1972 ... These Colors always reminded, not only me, on Vegetable-Soups or whatever. For example Big Valley, Gay 90's, Dipsy Doodle and Stardust. It's also evident that the "original JKK-Black" on the Bally-Machines became extinct after his last Design, Alligator, and was replaced by these strange gun-powder-colors, somentimes rather Black, sometimes almost grey.

He was sure that the reason therefore just was that someone, maybe even just accidentally, got a hold on some cheap Colors, wherever and for what Reason ever they came from - that did not matter as long as Money could be saved. He did not like these Color-Combinations at all and guessed that this Point alone would have created some very big Issues with the Bally-Management because they would have forced him to use those Colors on his Designs.
They started to use grey Backbox-Doors instead of his black ones already in late 68 too.
I asked him if he noticed that the Bally Hoo-Flyer shows a Machine with Chrome-Legs (the serial-run instead had black Legs) and he laughed, this maybe was an Attempt by "the Mouth" to show that they did not need his black Legs.
But the black Legs stayed until Williams took Bally over and the pointy Figure on the Apron, that he designed in 1968 and that stayed there until early 1980 (the Test-Samples of Nitro Ground Shaker still used it).

I guess now everything from the Conversations from late 1999 and early 2000 is written here now.
Maybe I forgot something else but if so it will be added.

For anyone who's interested - one Story will follow, which I like very much - this was the last and the longest Converstion with him. I asked him what his next Bally-Machine would have been named and looked like if he had stayed in the Industry. This "imaginary" Machine will be described as exactly as possible so an Addict with a Talent to copy the Style of JKK should be able to design it by himself. Maybe in 50 years, who knows...

#161 35 days ago
Quoted from Mardi-Gras-Man:

He was sure that the reason therefore just was that someone, maybe even just accidentally, got a hold on some cheap Colors, wherever and for what Reason ever they came from - that did not matter as long as Money could be saved. He did not like these Color-Combinations at all and guessed that this Point alone would have created some very big Issues with the Bally-Management because they would have forced him to use those Colors on his Designs.

Cost savings may be why some Bally pins of this era seem to have cabinet paint jobs that flake off, if you sneeze at them.

#162 35 days ago
Quoted from pinwiztom:

Cost savings may be why some Bally pins of this era seem to have cabinet paint jobs that flake off, if you sneeze at them.

Good point Tom, but please don't forget that this Problem was solved from early 1969 on. Cosmos and the following Machines did not flake anylonger. JKK told that in the Beginning everything went fine with those new Sort of Cabinet-Colors that Bally used from late 1966 onwards. When the Machines were new they had some nice kind of Glance and it wasn't until 1968 when some chemical process that no one could have foreseen "destroyed" the Colors. When they noticed it they quickly changed it. So particularly that Problem wasn't due to the Bean-Counters.
If you look at surviving Machines from 1969 like Bally Hoo or Camelot today, they still are in good shape, please check it out!
The first Machine suffering from that was BAZAAR from October 1966, followed by CAPERSVILLE. The last one was MINI-ZAG from Autumn 1968. COSMOS was the first Model who didn't flake any longer. If you look at the JOKER-Engineering-Prototype that Jay discovered for the IPDB you will see that it's flaking too, so it must be maufactured before the Winter 68-69 ... The JOKER Test-Samples then must have been manufactured early in Spring 1969 and not a single one out of the 4 I saw personally had a flaking-Problem.

You can compare this with an Issue that Mercedes-Benz had in the mid-90ies with their new Model W210 ... after a couple of years the Painting began to flake. No one could predict that.

And one more thing regarding COSMOS - since his Cabinet-Artwork was re-used for Christian Marche's ON BEAM this Artwork was released in 3 different Color-Combinations.

#163 35 days ago
Quoted from Mardi-Gras-Man:

Here's the next Conversation which took some Time and even more Money (Phone-Calls to the USA weren't cheap then) but was also very interesting . I asked him if he ever regretted having left Bally and, following that, there came the Point of the Pinball-Crisis which began very slowly already in late 1968 and reached it's Peak (or Low, however you like to name it) in 1970 - both Subjects belong together.
So it's better to start with that Crisis which had its Origins in Germany. Therefore please note---> as stated before I'm no selfish German who thinks "we" are the Best, "we" are the most Important and the Smartest, but - if you like it or not - it's an undeniable Fact that Germany was a very important Market in the 60ies and early 70ies when Pinball was illiegal in many Parts of the USA ... and especially for Bally Germany was even the most important Market.
First you must know that the german Scene back then consisted of ca 4500 Operators, most of them were 1-Man-Companies, a lot of them were disabled War-Veterans who couldn't do a "proper" work anylonger. Most of them had some 20 to 50 Pinball-Machines. Unlike today where, like in any other Business too, some greedy Juggernauts dominate everything.
The most important thing for the german Scene was the so-called "Geldspielgerät", some sort of very harmless Slot-Machine where you could win some little Money. These Machines could be found in almost any "Wirtshaus", were 2 of them where allowed, and of course in the Arcades (called "Spiel-Halle") where 3 were allowed. In 1968 the Government decided to allow a new Price of 20 Pfennig (I guess at that point in Time the Relation of Dollar to DeutschMark was 1:3) instead of 10 Pfennig for each Game, which allowed a double Income overnight. (One Game of Pinball at this Time in Germany did cost 20 Pfennig and 3-Balls-per-Game were common since 1966 over here). Those new Machines also offered some new Features which made them more interesting - the Players went crazy and demanded them everywhere.
*****
Americans of course must know a little about pricing over here ... Pinball-Machines were very expensive in the 60ies in Germany. As mentioned above, the Relation Dollar to Deutschmark was ca 1 to 3 in the late 60ies ... a new Pinball-Machine in the 2nd half of the 60ies did cost around 5000 Deutschmark includig Taxes, a lot of Money. For Comparison - an Opel Kadett-B, the typical Car for the german "Man from the Street" alongside with the Beetle (which slowly declined in Popularity) did cost 6000,- to 7000,- (a Beetle ca 5000,- to 5500,- Deutschmark) ... Stationwagons prefered by german Pinball-Operators like Opel Rekord CarAVan and Ford 17M Turnier did cost about 8000,-. You see, a new Pinball-Machine surely was some sort of Investment for a German.
(Only 10 years later Things were completely different - the Relation Dollar to Deutschmark was reduced to 1:2 ... a new Pinball-Machine in 1978 was even slightly cheaper than 10 years before and the average price Germans did spend for a new Car arose to 16.000 Deutschmark. Plus one 3-Ball-Game in 1978 did cost 50 Pfennig ... in 1968 you got 3 Games for 50 Pfennig and 1 for 20 Pfennig... in early 1980 when Gorgar hit the Market, the price went even higher to one 3-Ball-Game for 1 Deutschmark, 3 Games for 2 Deutschmark and then again 10 Games for 5 Deutschmark ).
It's also worth to know that 60ies-Machines were in Use 8 years or even longer ... whereas for example an early electronic Bally with Chimes was absolutely obsolete already in 1981. It's very strange that those "real" early Electronics like Night Rider are "thrown into the same Pot" as for Example a Flash Gordon by today's Collectors, all called "Early Electronics" which is Bullshit. Germans in that time categorized speaking Machines like Gorgar already even as "the 3rd electronic Generation" and Double-Level-Machines like Black Knight as the 4th .... In 1981 these were 2 different Worlds. It's ridiculous and laughable reading Stuff describing a Black Knight an "early Electronic".
In the mid-80ies the Dollar went extremely high and the Machines became very expensive. Then in the 90ies Prices became very moderate again ...
the WPC-Machines were relatively cheap for ca 5000,- to 6000,- Deutschmark including Taxes. A highly-frequented Terminator 2 for example could pay his Rent in a few Weeks. I guess they really were much too cheap in the 90ies ... late Models like wonderful Champoin Pub with sadly low Production-Runs were far too cheap and did not even pay back their Production-Costs and we all know what happened then. Very very sad indeed.
*****
Now Back -
And because most of the german Operators were rather small Companies without that much Money or Fortune in the Background all of them focused in buying new "Geldspielgeräte" instead of Pinball-Machines. This did not mean, never of course, that Pinball declined in Popularity, it's just that they used their Pinball-Machines longer and had to rotate them more often. Several 100.000's of "Geldspiel-Geräten" were operated then, and the majority of the "old" 10-Pfennig-Machines were replaced in just 1 year, as fast as they could, with the new 20-Pfennig-Machines.
This explains why the german Pinball-Market sacked down dramatically from late 1968 on. And it should stay that Way until 1971 because...
In 1969 there came another Problem for Pinball in Germany, because the Pool-Billard-Boom started. Don't ask me why, I have absolutely no Idea why it took until 1969 to make the Germans Pool-crazy but that's the way it was. Those Tables were very expensive and more and more Customers demanded a Pool-Table in their "german Wirtshaus" - and again the Pinball-Sales dropped just because the Money was spent on Pool-Tables.
I was eight years old in 1970 and we had a 1966 Williams 8 Ball in 1968-69. It was very popular, made Money like Hell and was played to Death in 1 year. Being just a dumb Kid by then I was sure that it was Williams' 8 Ball who made Pool-Tables so popular. My Family even considered a Pool-Table for our Game-Room but luckily enough the Room was too small therefore ... but there was a great Danger to lose the Pinball-Machines - absolutely terrible.
Gottlieb and Bally sold far less Machines in Germany in 1969 and even more less in 1970 when the Pool-Craze reached its Heighth. Williams did not suffer that much because Hans Rosenzweig, the very clever Boss of "Seevend" (which imported Williams and Chicago Coin) offered special Packages including Pool-Tables, "Geldspielgeräte" and of course Pinball-Machines for relative low Package-Prices. That's why 1969 to 1971 were the so-called "Williams-Years" in Germany - they returned in 1979 with Flash and Gorgar.
And except for the Period from mid-1981 until mid-1985 when Bally dominated once more, Williams took over again when Comet was released and of course stayed there until 1999... That's the german Part of this Story.
Gottlieb did not suffer that much because they absolutely dominated France with their own french Company "Mondial" but they were outsold by Williams in these years for the first Time.
Bally had another Problem anyway, because their Machines were too expensive to produce. They sold well but did not make much Money. Sam Stern was asked to be the Savior and took over the Bally-Management for ca 1 year. This also was the Point when Bally was transferred from a Company to a Corporation, when JKK's Designs Joker, Cosmos and Alligator/Gator were produced or designed. Costs had to be saved, and Features like the popular "Extra-Bonus"-Score-Reels disappeared.
JKK told this regarding these Issues ... Bally offered him the Job as Senior-Designer but he refused. Not only he was sure that he still would he hassled and criticised by certain People who had no Interest in Art and Design but only in Money but also because of the urgent need to save money too.
It became evident that Bally tried to save Costs whereever they just could.
They began to use cheap Flippers without Letters for example. The Vaults were searched through over and over to use "NOS"-Parts and they found these old letterless Flippers and put them on Joker and Alligator/Gator ... originally he wanted to use green Flippers on these, but the orange, letterless ones were not all that bad because that color matched at least with the Mouths of the Gators.
The very solid Cabinets from then on were manufactured out of cheaper sorts of Wood and lost Weight, the Metal-Frame used cheaper Materials and so on.
I asked him if he had any Idea why Gottlieb used some Trim from Woodrail-Machines on Machines like Four Seasons and College Queens and he told that
at this Point in Time all Manufacturers tried desperately to save Money wherever they could. By sure someone found some Boxes somewhere in some Vault containing these old Woodrail-Parts for the Front of the Top. So this surely was the Case.
After he left Bally for good he still had his Contacts of course and he knew for sure that Bally planned to close down the Pinball-Division in 1971 and this would surely have happened if Four Million B.C. wouldn't have become such a Success. They shut it down in early 1958 and started all over again in early 1963, it would have been no big Deal at all closing it down a 2nd Time in 1971 without a Fuzz.
I also asked him about his thoughts about these "very strange" Colors that were used from late 1969 until early 1972 ... These Colors always reminded, not only me, on Vegetable-Soups or whatever. For example Big Valley, Gay 90's, Dipsy Doodle and Stardust. It's also evident that the "original JKK-Black" on the Bally-Machines became extinct after his last Design, Alligator, and was replaced by these strange gun-powder-colors, somentimes rather Black, sometimes almost grey.
He was sure that the reason therefore just was that someone, maybe even just accidentally, got a hold on some cheap Colors, wherever and for what Reason ever they came from - that did not matter as long as Money could be saved. He did not like these Color-Combinations at all and guessed that this Point alone would have created some very big Issues with the Bally-Management because they would have forced him to use those Colors on his Designs.
They started to use grey Backbox-Doors instead of his black ones already in late 68 too.
I asked him if he noticed that the Bally Hoo-Flyer shows a Machine with Chrome-Legs (the serial-run instead had black Legs) and he laughed, this maybe was an Attempt by "the Mouth" to show that they did not need his black Legs.
But the black Legs stayed until Williams took Bally over and the pointy Figure on the Apron, that he designed in 1968 and that stayed there until early 1980 (the Test-Samples of Nitro Ground Shaker still used it).
I guess now everything from the Conversations from late 1999 and early 2000 is written here now.
Maybe I forgot something else but if so it will be added.
For anyone who's interested - one Story will follow, which I like very much - this was the last and the longest Converstion with him. I asked him what his next Bally-Machine would have been named and looked like if he had stayed in the Industry. This "imaginary" Machine will be described as exactly as possible so an Addict with a Talent to copy the Style of JKK should be able to design it by himself. Maybe in 50 years, who knows...

I learned so much in a single post. Thank you.

#164 35 days ago

Mardi-Gras-Man is amazing. What a treasure for him to share these memories from his youth.

#165 33 days ago

A strong theme from Mardi-Gras-Man 's report of his last conversations with Jerry Kelley is the cost-cutting which was taking place during this era.

It may help explain why some of the modern artwork became more prominent from 1965-1975, replacing hardware innovations prevalent in the previous era. Artwork contributed significantly towards the success of games like Capersville and RockMakers. Creative artwork was cheaper.

#166 30 days ago

Thanks a lot to all of you. I can't imagine I would have received nice Comments like yours in Germany. Much appreciated!

Before I write the Story of "the last JKK-Machine" which will be a very long Story too I would like to hear YOUR Thoughts about this ---> Since most Artists liked to hide little Secrets and Jokes and often worked Tongue-in-Cheek I often wondered if the Aborigine and the Name of the Machine itself on Bally's BOOMERANG made Fun about Nixon. Several (german) People I spoke to over the Years remarked the Similarity too.
And if you keep in Mind that some Artwork-Packages were done 1 or 2 years before the Machines got produced, this could mean that the Artwork for BOOMERANG was designed already in 1972. Plus, the Word BOOMERANG alone could symbolize what happened to Nixon --- all the Bullshit he did and his infame Lies he told to your Country fired backwards to him like a Boomerang.
What's your Opinion please?

Boomerang Nixon (resized).jpgBoomerang Nixon (resized).jpg

But anyway, and just because I'm always glad finding a Reason to mention Steve McQueen, anyone who's interested in that Nixon-Stuff, there's a great and relatively new Movie "FINDING STEVE McQUEEN" featuring great Actors delivering a fantastic Job. You have to watch it carefully, it's full of Time-Jumps back-and-forward ... I read that some People find it irritating.
Definitely worth a Look - full of Reminiscences and Phrases from McQueen-Movies, a great Soundtrack (including the embarrassing Propaganda-Song "Nixon Now") and wonderful bright Colors. Nixon gets called a "Bullshit-Artist", "Cruc", a Dog-Ass-Face, "C**ksu**er" and "Motherf***er" .

FINDING STEVE MCQUEEN (resized).jpgFINDING STEVE MCQUEEN (resized).jpg

#167 30 days ago
Quoted from Mardi-Gras-Man:

What's your Opinion please?

I'm not seeing it. Maybe, but most Nixon cartoons are not that style.

nixon (resized).pngnixon (resized).png
#168 30 days ago
Quoted from Mardi-Gras-Man:

I'm always glad finding a Reason to mention Steve McQueen

Back in the 1970's, as recent college graduates, my wife and I did a car tour of the USA. We stopped at Big Sur Lodge where I had saved up and made dinner reservations. At a table near us were Ali McGraw and Steve McQueen. I left them in peace and just smiled at them. I remember their physical figures and how happy they seemed that night.

Not surprised if an artist put a veiled reference to a living person in the backglass. Certainly, Richard Nixon did have a square face. Not sure why he would be referenced as an Aboriginal, but it's a fun idea.

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