(Topic ID: 2851)

Please don't do this...


By glilly-BOA

8 years ago



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  • Latest reply 2 years ago by bronco-jon
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    There are 89 posts in this topic. You are on page 1 of 2.
    #1 8 years ago

    I know most of you are probably already aware of this, but incase you're not or maybe you have a differing opinion on this...

    I just rebuilt a set of flippers on a pinball and had to remove a bunch of guncked up dirty oil from inside the flipper coil sleeves and around the coil and the linkage and the flipper shaft, etc...

    DO NOT PUT OIL ON YOUR PINBALL COIL ASSEMBLIES!!

    They are designed to operate dry. If there is a problem with a coil sticking or being weak, then there is something mechanically wrong. If you add oil, it may help for a short time, but in the long run, it will cause many more problems than it fixes.

    If anyone would like to add to this, please feel free. Or, if you have a differing opinion, please offer it.

    I'd like to hear all of your experiences with this and / or opinions.

    G

    #2 8 years ago

    I helped out an old guy once told him not to do it but he did it anyway - used WD40.

    years latter the only image comes to mind whenever his game comes up in conversation or sale is that of an old Rail Road Eng. with one of those big oiling cans hitting the bearings of a 4-8-2 steam loco. 'the oiler'

    #3 8 years ago

    What do you use on the link? White lithium???

    #4 8 years ago

    I think 99% of us use nothing. I have used 3in 1 oil on slingshots......not really even sold on that though.

    #5 8 years ago

    I see oil sold on E-Bay saying it's a must. Is there anything on the machine that should be oiled?

    (Good old Laser War!!!)

    Laser_War.jpg

    Verteran at playing pinball, rookie at maintaining them!

    #6 8 years ago

    I just went to service a friend of a friends Abra ca Dabra awhile back, and he had sprayed the coilsleeves down with WD40 when he got it. He wanted me to check why the flippers were sticking, Problem solved! Carbon/dirt + WD40=TAR.

    #7 8 years ago

    thanks for the info!

    #8 8 years ago

    There are very few places which use a lubricant. Drop targets and sliding target mechanisms are the only ones I can think of and they use a grease, not oil. Not sure what kind of grease it is. The manuals state not to use oils.

    BTW, WD-40 is not a lubricant.

    #9 8 years ago

    I think the guys who put together the pinrepair manual said it best: "You can't fix a mechanical problem with a chemical solution."

    #10 8 years ago

    Here is a good way to think of it.

    If it's plastic on plastic, Absolutely no oil.
    If it's metal on plastic, Absolutely no oil.
    If it's metal on metal, oil (grease) lightly only where the metal pieces touch and only per the specifications in the manual. If your machine requires any lubrication, the manual will mention it.

    You should never put lubrication in a coil sleeve. If it is sticky, fix the actual problem or replace it. I knew a guy who swore by using graphite. He said it didn't have the same gumming effect that lubricants did. Yeah, well, try working on one with a bunch of black dusty graphite all over it. What a mess!!

    G

    #11 8 years ago

    I won't claim to have seen everything, but all the drop targets I've seen that were greased were a mess and didn't work properly. I clean off the grease and leave them dry and they work fine. As gilly-BOA stated, they are plastic on metal and don't need lubrication.

    gilly-BOA's guide is spot on. In summary, you are better off not lubricating anything on a solid state pinball machine. You'll do less damage in 95+ percent of the cases if you leave everything dry.

    #12 8 years ago

    I know I am going to get S*@#$# for this, but I have used WD-40 as a de-greaser and a cleaner. If some dumb operator has dumped a bunch of graphite all over everything, a quick squirt of the handyman's friend cleans it all out in an instant. Two of my machines had graphite in the coils when I got them.

    I think the key here is that using it as a cleaner is very different than trying to get something moving again because it is sticking. On the rare occasion that I use WD-40, I always wipe all the grease off, allow the part to dry and wipe it again. WD-40 is an excellent cleaner.

    #13 8 years ago

    "What do you use on the link? White lithium???"

    If you're talking about the flipper link (used to be called fiber link in old games) they shouldn't need lubing either. There should be a nylon bushing in the eye of the link that does two things. 1 - keeps it from wearing out as quick, 2 - helps it move smoothly. Nylon plastic has a built in lubricating affect.

    G

    #14 8 years ago

    I won't claim to have seen everything, but all the drop targets I've seen that were greased were a mess and didn't work properly. I clean off the grease and leave them dry and they work fine.

    When my tech was out at my house recently, I watched while he cleaned the drop target assembly on my SoF. What did he use? Novus 2.

    #15 8 years ago

    I have used electro-contact cleaner a few times on certain things. It evaporates completely. Do not use WD-40, oil, or a tuner renew type spray as it has a lubricant.

    #16 8 years ago

    Brokedad, that looks like it is a better choice for a cleaner. No-Lube and Non-Flamable.

    Besides, who needs lube when I'm around?

    #17 8 years ago

    The manuals state not to use oils.

    The manuals actually always state that there should be a medium viscosity oil on some parts of the games.... at least on the games I own... I don´t follow these lubrication suggestions though...But the manual tells you to use oil....

    #18 8 years ago

    I will have to go thru my manuals again. I've never seen that so I must have missed it.

    #19 8 years ago

    I bought that little bottle of oil on eBay, as someone mentioned on here. I have ONLY used it on one thing: my shooter rod. It makes a world of difference! Just the tiniest couple of drops will make a rough shooter rod 'oh so smooth'. I've even had some that would make a very slight gritty sounding noise, and after putting a drop or two on it, it stopped making the noise and shot a ball like a new assembly would.

    As far as I can tell, I can't see any problem with this. The oil can't go anywere else that I see, and it stays on the metal.

    #20 8 years ago

    The one thing that I saw several times in the previous post...."the manual says". Sounds like the best option is to spend the $15-$20 for the full manual for your machines and follow the maintenance instructions in the manual. As an airplane mechanic, we always use the book step by step, no deviations. Cannot go wrong if you listen to your MOM (Machine Owner’s Manual).

    #21 8 years ago

    @absocountry.... That only works if you have a perfectly good AMM.... Sometimes you just have to make deviations, nothing that will affect saftey though.... I.A.W

    #22 8 years ago

    "The manuals actually always state that there should be a medium viscosity oil on some parts of the games...."

    Thanks for the additional information WET.
    Can you cite an example as a refernece? I've gone through all of mine, and the only one I can find is one (Williams Millionaire) that states to lightly oil two points on the ball through feeder where there are two metal points that come in contact.

    G

    #23 8 years ago

    The DE manual I looked at states to oil the rails that the playfield slides on. I didn't see anything else mentioned. However I didn't do an exhaustive search.

    1 year later
    #24 7 years ago

    I picked up a Rollergames this weekend and noticed this when I looked over the manual.

    I use the Teflon Super lube grease on EM's and I think I'll use the Super Lube oil where they call it out here. I'm guessing one drop will last as long as I own the machine.

    I think it's the William's Expo manual that warns you that many more problems are caused by over lubricating than under lubricating. To me that means, "When in doubt, go without."

    For coils/sleeves if I can't or don't want to dismantle them I will rinse them with 99% drug store alcohol using a squeeze bottle or oral syringe. With game power off, rinse, actuate, wipe, repeat until your rag stops getting dirty. Give it some time to dry when you're done.

    I have used a dry wax teflon spray lube on my shooter rods with good success. I don't have enough experience to recommend it to others though.

    Rollergames.jpg

    #25 7 years ago

    On my EMs ill lubricate Metal on Metal.
    Super Thin layer of Teflon grease for wiper boards,

    Sometimes a drop of Remoil on metal shafts through metal berrings on the Units also.

    Never on plastic on metal or plastic on plastic

    #26 7 years ago

    I see the Nightcrawler mechs in X-Men LE look to use the same lube that they use on the playfield glides....but I don't know what that is.

    #27 7 years ago
    Quoted from glilly-BOA:

    If it's metal on metal, oil (grease) lightly only where the metal pieces touch and only per the specifications in the manual. If your machine requires any lubrication, the manual will mention it.

    Not always. Stern doesn't recommend any lubrication of their spinners, but a small drop of light oil (3 in 1 works) on each side improves them tremendously. They really should do it at the factory. If anyone reading this hasn't done this to their Stern(s) with spinners, they should do it right now. You'll thank me. Besides the extra spins and points you'll get, it also make the spinner sound effect much more noticeable. Spidey and AC/DC are two that really benefit in this area. Dirt cheap, but very noticeable 'mod'.

    I use white lithium grease on older drop target assemblies, but always a very light coat. All too often I've seen too much grease on games. If you're going to use grease, go light. Your game is home use only, not being beat to death in an arcade at Disneyland. I also use a dry spray lube occasionally. The one I'm currently using is simply called Liquid Wrench Dry Lubricant. It leaves a dry residue and over spray can easily be wiped up with a rag and alcohol. Sticky newer Stern drop target banks can sometimes be 'fixed' with dry lube.

    4 years later
    #28 2 years ago

    Hey - There are so many lubricants out there - and greases, pastes, cleaning solvents, etc. Soliciting thoughts from the peanut gallery (so to speak) - to see what crosses over from servicing other electronics. Curious to their effects on pinball machine parts and what is good / bad for parts. This might be a helpful refresh on the topic as new products have been created.

    1.) VCR lubricant designed for motors - comes with a needle tip and you only need a small drop. (Moving parts like spinners)
    2.) White Lithium Grease - (Spinning parts)
    3.) Spray on Silicon - (Coating moving parts)
    4.) Fader Lubricant and cleaner (Guitar Center, for mixing boards) more like a cleaner, less like a lube..
    5.) Tuner Cleaner and Lubricant
    6.) PB Blaster Cleaner
    7.) Flux Cleaner (For PCB's and solder, removing Chipquick Flux, etc)
    8.) Electronic Parts Cleaner and Lubricant
    9.) FerroFluid lubricant (used in speaker coils)
    10.) 20W40 (Topic Above, answered)
    11.) 3 in 1 Oil
    12.) Thermal Grease / Paste - (White paste used as Lubricant - designed for FET's with heatsinks)
    13.) 99.9 % Rubbing Alcohol
    14.) Canned Air (good for most things - any ill effects?).
    15.) Guitar String Cleaner (made to make metal glide, not really a lubricant more like a metal coating)
    16.) Carb / Injector Cleaner.
    17.) WD-40 (Topic above, answered).
    18.) Liquid Wrench.
    19.) Lucas Oil.
    20.) Window Cleaners(Windex, Winshield washer, bug free).
    21.) Headlamp restoration kits (For renewing old yellowed plastics).
    22.) Chipquick Flux for soldering (Makes Hi Temp lead-free - ROHS soldering a breeze with a modern good iron - 900F -Flows Like Honey)

    #29 2 years ago

    The only lubricant you'll ever need for pinball parts( https://www.mscdirect.com/browse/tnpla/00257188?cid=ppc-google-New+-+Lubricants%2C+Coolants+%26+Fluids+-+PLA_sE8893r6O___164110813911_c_S&mkwid=sE8893r6O|dc&pcrid=164110813911&rd=k&product_id=257188&gclid=CKGMju6Ok9MCFYSLswodOaIM6A ). Do not use white lithium. It eventually breaks down and creates a white, messy powder. Also, can we agree as a community to stop using WD-40 as a lubricant?

    #30 2 years ago

    It is called "sewing machine oil" and it has been used since the 1930s on pinball machines, metal on metal contact parts.

    #31 2 years ago

    I have used this on shooter rods and some sliding mechanisms. Wipe/clean whatever you are doing and a little shot of this super fine teflon powder. Slippery as hell and no build up or bad after effects.

    IMG_2751 (resized).JPG

    #32 2 years ago
    Quoted from xTheBlackKnightx:

    It is called "sewing machine oil" and it has been used since the 1930s on pinball machines, metal on metal contact parts.

    FYI this is also sold as "gun oil"

    #33 2 years ago

    WD-40. Water Displacement formula #40. Great for cleaning, and unsticking rusty things. not a lubricant.

    #34 2 years ago

    I use oil...rarely.

    Metal on metal. I've used it on the ball trough ejects (the ones under the apron on a hinge) on gottlieb system 80's that can screw up and williams ss games. I also use it on spinners, just a tiny dab and your spinner will spin longer.

    #35 2 years ago
    Quoted from Rdoyle1978:

    FYI this is also sold as "gun oil"

    Unfortunately, when sewing machine oil is marketed as "gun oil", it is being used improperly based on temperature operational effectiveness of the oil.

    "Gun oils" are in the same category as sewing machine oils as very thin, most synthetic (non-organic, today) based oils, but proper "gun oils" have the ability to NOT break down at higher operating temperatures. Pinball parts do not reciprocate at anywhere near the speeds of modern semi- and fully automatic rifles and machine guns anyway.
    Sewing machine oils are far from optimal for gun use.
    How do I know this?
    I spent a full career in the military and was responsible for large armouries during periods, including replacement, repair, and management of parts for weapons both small arms, and crew served weapons.

    "Gun Oils" are generally being marketed today for preventative protection (ie rust) not lubrication, which there are many better options.

    Basically when it comes to oils for pinball machines you can go forwards and "hi tech" but not backwards.
    Some people use super end bicycle oils that are used for the chains in racing bikes, which work wonderfully.

    Anything else behind "3-in-1" oil should not be used for pinball metal to metal contact such as slingshot kickers, kick outs, and other complicated assemblies, due to the fact, just like firearms, carbon buildup will cause the oil to promote "caking" of the carbon into a gummy, nasty tar.

    Solvents of any kind are not lubricants designed for metal parts.
    This is not a car, folks.
    This methods are used as temporary fixes, not permanent solutions.

    If you want to see what happens when a person uses WD-40 (or equivalent solvents and contact cleaners) inside pinball machines FOR ANY REASON (cleaning included), be prepared to call the fire department and know that your pinball machine will be destroyed. It makes no difference if it is turned on or not. Residues remain.
    I have already seen this mistake by others at least a dozen times, and the statement is always, "I did not know".

    Don't join the pintard ranks of the past, present, or future.
    But, I am sure, someone will make this mistake again soon, and read this specific post later, saying, "I wish I had known."

    ccfire2.jpg

    #36 2 years ago

    Not to sidetrack the discussion, but since contact cleaner has been brought up...

    While very dramatic, all that photo proves is the propellant, which quickly evaporates, is flammable. I could do the same thing with hairspray. This is not proof that the applied product is flammable (although it could be in the case of some cheap contact cleaners).

    DeoxIT contact cleaner, the brand I recommend, is specified by the manufacturer as non-flammable once dry (less than a few seconds after spraying). This was a requirement for the medical products we used it on. I'm not sure about that specific CRC product since it looks to be older, but the current contact cleaners from CRC are non-flammable when dry.

    https://www.conncoll.edu/media/website-media/offices/ehs/envhealthdocs/Contact_Cleaner.pdf.

    Personally I use modern lubricants like Super Lube oil or grease with PTFE.

    #37 2 years ago

    Since there is misunderstanding regarding the components of contact cleaners and solvents based in pressurized or non-pressurized cans, I will go into a bit more technical explanation.

    First, we need to show an example of application:

    WD-40 in action, direct surface sprayed first (with remaining residue not propellent), and then open torched, by "experts".

    Next, we need to explain what contact cleaners are:

    WD-40 (and other contact cleaners) specifically are hygroscopic (not "hydroscopic") compound meaning "water displacing" solvent, that actually ATTRACTS water to the compound and promotes rust, if not removed, which is common to ALL contact cleaners used with metal surfaces, unless mixed with other chemicals for other use to make the long term effect inert. They "stick" to metal for a reason. This is not a good thing for metal on metal contact parts, whether guns, or pinball assemblies, beyond flammable characteristics.

    Next, what compounds make these cleaners:

    If people want to read what makes these components dangerous for use in pinball machines:

    Read MSDS documents and learn the components of products of use in chemical components, or disagree.
    I would look at the other aspects beyond aliphatic hydrocarbons.

    In this case, WD-40.
    https://wd40.com/files/pdf/msds-wd482671453.pdf

    And the final notes:

    Many of these same chemicals are found in similar products, or additional chemical chemicals added that are even more combustible.

    It is not exclusively the aerosols that make products flammable.
    Not all contact cleaners are CRC certified as non-flammable when dry, even today.
    Most will not fully evaporate when applied.

    My secondary background is chemistry, beyond engineering, in manufacturing.
    This is about as simple as I can make it.
    If you want to use any type of contact cleaners on pinball machine parts for any reason, the part must be removed from the machine.
    After it is cleaned, all residue must be removed by detergent, or a good scrubbing with soap and water.
    The parts must be fully dry, before reinstallation.
    Lubrication is performed during reassembly with a non-reactive compound oil, non-organic, readily available today.
    Preferably, one or two single drops one the end of a pointed solder hand tool before the assembly is placed inside the game.

    #38 2 years ago

    Well..I'm fine with the no oil stance.

    But a couple comments:

    1) Hating WD-40 is a national past time of epic proportions. I wish I had a nickel for every chemist/engineer/machinist/genius who can tell you exactly why WD-40 is nothing short of the Devil's own lubricant. It's probably not the best at anything...but it has some good uses.

    2) My Addams Family manual says that oil should be used.

    #39 2 years ago
    Quoted from GregCon:

    Well..I'm fine with the no oil stance.
    But a couple comments:
    Hating WD-40 is a national past time of epic proportions. I wish I had a nickel for every chemist/engineer/machinist/genius who can tell you exactly why WD-40 is nothing short of the Devil's own lubricant. It's probably not the best at anything...but it has some good uses.

    There is absolutely nothing wrong with WD-40, as long as it used as it was designed.

    The problem is simply don't know what it supposed to do.
    Break down rust, or corrosion, then you have to remove it from the surface it was applied, or you basically undo your work long term.
    It dries the metal out.

    It is not a lubricant.

    It has TONS of GREAT secondary uses.
    This short video shows some of the many "survival" options, but some of the options are temporary solutions.
    Meaning "when you don't have any other products available".
    The video narrator clearly states that WD-40 is not optimal for firearms and "working parts".
    Pinball machines are not $2 padlocks.

    Anyone that has worked on pinball machines for more than a decade has seen at least one time somebody has used contact cleaners on the underside of the playfield, or some type of motor grease.

    The burn marks and odor is unmistakable for cleaners, and the gunk that is not natural carbon dust from the grease.

    Sometimes both.

    If a person wants to disagree, no problem.
    It makes no difference if the game is an EM or SS, although EM is generally worse due to the mechanical nature and open frequent sparking due to age and operation.
    Feel free to learn via discovery, most of us "old people" already have seen what happens.
    I am trying to help people protect them games, not argue with people.

    #40 2 years ago
    Quoted from terryb:

    While very dramatic, all that photo proves is the propellant, which quickly evaporates, is flammable. I could do the same thing with hairspray. This is not proof that the applied product is flammable (although it could be in the case of some cheap contact cleaners).

    Here's the next picture in the series:

    The Coin unit on the bottom panel of an EM Gottlieb that was sprayed with
    contact cleaner. The game started a fire, burning all the wiring and the Coin unit
    itself! This is just ONE reason why you don't want to use contact cleaner.
    If this is going to be fixed, ALL the burnt cloth-covered wire in this area will
    need to be replaced. Also the bakelite plates on the Coin unit will also probably
    need to be replaced too, because they will be very brittle.

    ccfire3 (resized).jpg

    Source: http://www.pinrepair.com/em/index1.htm#lube

    #41 2 years ago
    Quoted from ajfclark:

    Here's the next picture in the series:

    Source: http://www.pinrepair.com/em/index1.htm#lube

    Really funny when someone sprays WD-40 on all the score motor switches and when the fire starts with playfield up, you hear the "plinks" of solder flying and wires coming off of the switch blade solder tabs.

    #42 2 years ago

    A tiny shot of 3 in1 oil on spinners is the only time i have ever used any sort of lube on a pin .

    #43 2 years ago

    What about dry graphite spray lubricant on slingshot plungers and flipper plungers? It stays where you spray it. It is not powdery like dry graphite. Is this stuff something to be avoided?

    blaster_graphite_dry (resized).png

    #44 2 years ago

    Given that graphite is a conductor, I wouldn't put it in a pinball table.

    #45 2 years ago

    WD-40, my sister hates it. I should state "really hates it". In her laundry/utility room she had a can of the stuff, on a high shelf. She had bumped the shelf, the can fell. Landing upside down, behind the water heater, the can starting spraying its contents toward the pilot light under the water heater. Poof! Large flames started shooting up behind the water heater. She runs to the phone, calls the fire department then grabs her fire extinguisher, as she goes back into the utility room. There was a large splash of water and plenty of black smoke, but no more flames. Seems the flames from the can was directly aimed at a copper pipe joint, the heat melted part of the solder. The water and the pressure of the water smothered out the fire.
    When the firemen arrived the smoke was still drifting out of the open door, she was outside crying, she said, 'It is out, its out!' The Firemen went inside, looked around, turned off the water, then the Captain told her that if he didn't see this he would have not believed it, and that she was quite lucky, well sort of. There was smoke damage in a few rooms, and water damage in the utility room. Took a couple of days to clean up. No more WD-40 is allowed in her house.

    At work, in the 1980's we would use for displacing water in vehicle distributor caps, worked like a charm. The other great use of WD-40 is for removing bubble gum from carpet. Spray it on the stuck gum, let it sit a bit, then carefully scrape the gum with a standard screw driver, the gum will come right out. Let it dry, and then vacuum, if flames start to shoot out the vacuum you are using way to much WD-40.

    #46 2 years ago
    Quoted from cottonm4:

    What about dry graphite spray lubricant on slingshot plungers and flipper plungers? Is this stuff something to be avoided?

    YES, avoid it!
    EXTREMELY FLAMMABLE!!!

    As I stated earlier, pinball owners please read the MSDS first.
    Look them up, they are available.

    http://blastercorp.com/images/sds/GS-Graphite-Dry-Lube-OSHA-GHS-SDS-2015-06-11.pdf

    Do not be creative and try new products on your pinball machines!

    Other reasons not to use it, this also promotes more gunk and electrical connectivity in the wrong places.
    That is if it never sets on fire due to sparking.
    General graphite spray is used for non-electrical purposes, not pinball machines.
    For the love of pinball, do not spray this stuff in EM score reels, motor assemblies, or stepper units, unless you want a crispy game.

    NOTE:
    Pinball game plungers of ANY TYPE require NO lubrication, these are NOT metal on metal pivot points.
    Replace the coil sleeves and clean the assemblies, please.

    #47 2 years ago

    WD-40 is good for freeing up crusty and rusty leg levelers and stubborn locks, but that's about it.

    Super Lube is a nice substitute for the original grease used on steppers, gears, and metal to metal pivot points on pinball machines.

    #48 2 years ago

    I have come across two Williams games from the late 50s from two different places that had the same grey black grease in every solenoid coil sleeve. The sleeves were all metal. Once I got that gunk out of there, the parts looked like brand new. And the games play liked greased lightning.

    #49 2 years ago
    Quoted from xTheBlackKnightx:

    YES, avoid it!
    EXTREMELY FLAMMABLE!!!
    As I stated earlier, pinball owners please read the MSDS first.
    Look them up, they are available.
    http://blastercorp.com/images/sds/GS-Graphite-Dry-Lube-OSHA-GHS-SDS-2015-06-11.pdf
    Do not be creative and try new products on your pinball machines!
    Other reasons not to use it, this also promotes more gunk and electrical connectivity in the wrong places.
    That is if it never sets on fire due to sparking.
    General graphite spray is used for non-electrical purposes, not pinball machines.
    For the love of pinball, do not spray this stuff in EM score reels, motor assemblies, or stepper units, unless you want a crispy game.
    NOTE:
    Pinball game plungers of ANY TYPE require NO lubrication, these are NOT metal on metal pivot points.
    Replace the coil sleeves and clean the assemblies, please.

    Whoa. Hold on here. I read the MSDS. I will agree that the propellent/liquid/vapor is flammable. However, once dry, the graphite that is left behind is not flammable. That was my take-away from reading the MSDS. Combustible? Yes. But not flammable. Not anywhere that I can in online research that I can find, anyway.

    ***********************
    https://cameochemicals.noaa.gov/chemical/25027

    " GRAPHITE is non-flammable in bulk form, but combustible. A reducing agent. Mixtures of graphite dust and air are explosive when ignited. Reacts violently with very strong oxidizing agents such as fluorine, chlorine dioxide, and potassium peroxide. Almost inert chemically when in bulk form. Keep away from ignition sources and oxidizing agents."

    *********************

    However, since I am not able to find consistently reliable information as to graphite being/or not being flammable, I liberally sprayed some of the Blaster brand on to a twisted wire brush handle and let it dry. And then I hit it with a torch type charcoal grill lighter to see what would happen. Nothing happened. It did not catch fire. After repeated attempts it did not catch fire; I seriously doubt that a pinball machine would catch fire with graphite being sprayed onto a slingshot plunger---which could be considered a non-electrical use of spray graphite.

    As another poster offered, graphite is conductive. I can't argue that, but with such a small amount of graphite being sprayed on plunger is that enough to cause shorting out problem with a flipper EOS switch? What about using spray graphite on the pivot for the slingshot kicker arm? The sling pivot is a high wear-point area and all metal-to-metal contact. I have had to replace three slingshot pivots due to them being completely worn out of tolerance. I think is pivot point would be a good candidate for some spray graphite to reduce wear on this pivot. It is not like a drop of liquid oil that will absorb dirt, or any other trash a pin might produce on the under side of a play field.

    Other than flammability, which I don't agree with, and conductivity that I am not sure about, what other reasons would there be to not use spray graphite at wear points inside a pinball machine?

    #50 2 years ago
    Quoted from cottonm4:

    Whoa. Hold on here. I read the MSDS. I will agree that the propellent/liquid/vapor is flammable. However, once dry, the graphite that is left behind is not flammable. That was my take-away from reading the MSDS. Combustible? Yes. But not flammable. Not anywhere that I can in online research that I can find, anyway.
    ***********************
    https://cameochemicals.noaa.gov/chemical/25027
    " GRAPHITE is non-flammable in bulk form, but combustible. A reducing agent. Mixtures of graphite dust and air are explosive when ignited. Reacts violently with very strong oxidizing agents such as fluorine, chlorine dioxide, and potassium peroxide. Almost inert chemically when in bulk form. Keep away from ignition sources and oxidizing agents."
    *********************
    However, since I am not able to find consistently reliable information as to graphite being/or not being flammable, I liberally sprayed some of the Blaster brand on to a twisted wire brush handle and let it dry. And then I hit it with a torch type charcoal grill lighter to see what would happen. Nothing happened. It did not catch fire. After repeated attempts it did not catch fire; I seriously doubt that a pinball machine would catch fire with graphite being sprayed onto a slingshot plunger---which could be considered a non-electrical use of spray graphite.
    As another poster offered, graphite is conductive. I can't argue that, but with such a small amount of graphite being sprayed on plunger is that enough to cause shorting out problem with a flipper EOS switch? What about using spray graphite on the pivot for the slingshot kicker arm? The sling pivot is a high wear-point area and all metal-to-metal contact. I have had to replace three slingshot pivots due to them being completely worn out of tolerance. I think is pivot point would be a good candidate for some spray graphite to reduce wear on this pivot. It is not like a drop of liquid oil that will absorb dirt, or any other trash a pin might produce on the under side of a play field.
    Other than flammability, which I don't agree with, and conductivity that I am not sure about, what other reasons would there be to not use spray graphite at wear points inside a pinball machine?

    SERIOUSLY? There is actually an arguement about whether a conductive material should be sprayed on ANY pinball parts??

    Go hook your car battery charger to the ends of a regular graphite pencil for a minute, come back on here, tell us why graphite should not be used on an electrical component.

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