(Topic ID: 352046)

Please check out these pics and tell me what you would do next

By Sjudkins

5 months ago


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  • 20 posts
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  • Latest reply 5 months ago by Pablito350
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#1 5 months ago

I'm using createx opaque colors and a cheap airbrush I just bought. Trying to touch up an area that I screwed up when I was removing the flipper assembly from the bottom of the play field and wasn't paying attention.... This is my first time so live and learn i guess.

So yeah I mixed up the colors and got them pretty close to what I thought was the right color. You can even see in the pictures, the one I took from the right side I sprayed a little bit of the paint on a piece of frisket and put it over there and (in real life at least) It appears to be a very close match. But as you can see from my touch up pictures It appears way too green. (In case it isn't clear I'm using painter's tape to mask with.). The paint on the frisket looks entirely different than all the paint i sprayed on the playfield, but its 100% the same! From the same airbrush... I sprayed the frisket at about the midway point of spraying the playfield..

My question is what should I do next?

1 - Wipe it all off and start over. (Although I don't really know what I would do other than just randomly add some more blue. Because as I mentioned, it appears to be a match! Unless something with the airbrush is making it more green the more layers I paint. This is probably five layers. But I don't remember it being any less green the first layer.)

2 - Sand it down to see how it looks and then put clear over it. (When should i remove the masking tape?)

3 - Go ahead and put clear over it and see if that brings it closer to the correct color. (Im kind of hoping/leaning this way..)

As far aa sanding/polishing. When would you? Now, with the tape on? Or now with the tape off? (I really dont want to put that tape back on. It took a few hours. Lol)

As far as the clear is concerned. I got the semi-gloss and satin createx clear. Thought I would start with the least shiny first, the satin. If that isn't shiny enough go with the semi-gloss on top of that. I also have some Varathane, which I originally planned to use. But because the area is so small, I'm considering just using the createx clear. Thinking it may just "work better"... So Im looking for opinions on that too.

As I mentioned, I'm masking with painter's tape. I would like to leave that on there until I won't be spraying anymore paint. Would you remove it before spraying the clear? Or would you maybe spray a couple of coats of the clear with the tape on then a couple with the tape off? I'm just thinking about the transition from the old to the new. With the tape on it's going to be a little more obvious (harder lines) I think than with the tape off and just masked with some cloths...

I'm a little worried I'm in over my head, but it still seems doable and Im just trying not to panic. Lol The first time I tried it with a paintbrush, I didn't like the look of it and wiped it all off...

Not that it matters that much but this machine is going to be routed, I've got it sold to an arcade. Unless they decide to back out because it's taking me so long!! Lol

Ive done a lot of work on this machine and it's my first EM. Rebuilt the flippers, replaced a couple light/lamp sockets, fixed several switches, cleaned a lot of contacts, fixed a scoring reel, replaced the power cable, fixed a couple of the flip flags, cleaned the crap out of the whole thing including all the relays, scoring reels, and chimes. All that's really left is this cosmetic touchup, which I caused while rebuilding the flippers! I traded for this machine (along with another EM and a Harlem Globetrotters), it was supposed to have been "shopped". Certainly not my definition of a "shop job".

Anyway..any advice is greatly appreciated! I really need to get this wrapped up and to the buyer before they back out!

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#2 5 months ago

After posting this, i was reading about "color shifting"... Is that what i have going on here? If youre wondering what I painted over... most of it was just the old color. Some was wood where i sanded the scratches down to wood. But for the deep scratches i used bondo and sanded it. We are talkng about a minute amount though.

Maybe i need to start over and lay down a solid white as a "primer"? I cringe at the idea of pulling up all that painters tape and then putting it back down! But... I need it to look decent.

#3 5 months ago

Any thoughts/advice?

#4 5 months ago
Quoted from Sjudkins:

Any thoughts/advice?

Hold your horses--you presented a fairly long, dense post, and it hasn't even been 24 hours yet. I saw your post last night, but I didn't really have time to dive into it.

#5 5 months ago

You might be in a bit over your head. Clear coating a localized area is extremely difficult to blend in with the surrounding area. If I am repainting anything I am also clearing the whole thing.

That said, the only way you can guarantee a color match is by having a consistent coating over the existing paint and your work in progress mixed paint. If you're looking at existing paint with one level of gloss and a paint sample with another gloss there is no way you'll nail the color. My approach goes like this: Get the paint color reasonably close. Put a flat dab of paint directly on the playfield overlapping your existing paint. Hit it with a heat gun. Wipe naptha over the entire area. If your paint sample doesn't completely disappear you can not move forward. From there you push and pull your saturation, tone, and lightness using a drop at a time until you get it perfect. Mix, heat, wipe, repeat. Sometimes you get it in 10 minutes. Sometimes an hour. But you will get it. Make sure you're mixing up a large enough amount to cover everything plus have some saved for emergency touch-ups. From there do what you're already doing. Airbrush the entire area - although if your match is really excellent you can just paint the damage itself.

In the end you will get the color part right, but I still worry about how you're going to handle the clear. You're going to have a pretty hefty ridge at the tape line either way.

Keep us posted. Will be interesting to hear how this gets solved.

#6 5 months ago
Quoted from A_Bord:

You might be in a bit over your head. Clear coating a localized area is extremely difficult to blend in with the surrounding area. If I am repainting anything I am also clearing the whole thing.
That said, the only way you can guarantee a color match is by having a consistent coating over the existing paint and your work in progress mixed paint. If you're looking at existing paint with one level of gloss and a paint sample with another gloss there is no way you'll nail the color. My approach goes like this: Get the paint color reasonably close. Put a flat dab of paint directly on the playfield overlapping your existing paint. Hit it with a heat gun. Wipe naptha over the entire area. If your paint sample doesn't completely disappear you can not move forward. From there you push and pull your saturation, tone, and lightness using a drop at a time until you get it perfect. Mix, heat, wipe, repeat. Sometimes you get it in 10 minutes. Sometimes an hour. But you will get it. Make sure you're mixing up a large enough amount to cover everything plus have some saved for emergency touch-ups. From there do what you're already doing. Airbrush the entire area - although if your match is really excellent you can just paint the damage itself.
In the end you will get the color part right, but I still worry about how you're going to handle the clear. You're going to have a pretty hefty ridge at the tape line either way.
Keep us posted. Will be interesting to hear how this gets solved.

Yeah.... I already decided the first thing i need to do is wipe clean and start completely over. (And hope i can!)

So yeah .. im going to try to reset and take the painting and clear down to a minimum. Much of the area is actually under the flipper.

Thank you!

#7 5 months ago
Quoted from Sjudkins:

Yeah.... I already decided the first thing i need to do is wipe clean and start completely over. (And hope i can!)
So yeah .. im going to try to reset and take the painting and clear down to a minimum. Much of the area is actually under the flipper.
Thank you!

Sounds like a good plan. You can do it.

#8 5 months ago

Its coming off. Im just going to get it all off, including the painters tape. And take advice from there.

This is after it's been sitting a couple of days and (just now) scrubbing like crazy with naphta and a white rag for 30 minutes...

These two pictures weree taken seconds apart. Fyi .. just different lighting...

After I first rubbed the naphta on there and it was wet/glossy. It actually looked closer to the right color. I don't think my mix... which I still have some of is that far off. I also bought the 40-30 balancing clear createx "color". I thought I might mix some of that in and see if that gets it closer.... I've decided I'm going to try to limit my painting and clear to just these areas that absolutely need it. As I mentioned they want this machine to play. And it plays well. I think I tried to do too much the first time...

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#9 5 months ago

Pretty close to where i started!

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#10 5 months ago

I got the color right. Got rid of the airbrush and used a paintbrush. I have another coat or two. Then im not exacty sure what i will do after that.. eventually i need to apply a touch of orange but that area is so small i dont see any issues there..

What would you do next? Considering where this is and the intent of the machine. I want to keep it simple.. i think....

I believe the last thing i want to do is use the Createx 4050 clear gloss (polyurethane) and polish it. I did a sample and it blends pretty well with the existing clear.

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#11 5 months ago

Opinion of one who’s not very good at touch ups; I’d do one more layer and then your clear on the spots.

It’s the outlane. Most people aren’t going to look that closely.

Hopefully you disclosed the condition to the arcade before you sold it.

#12 5 months ago

6

Quoted from steviechs:

Opinion of one who’s not very good at touch ups; I’d do one more layer and then your clear on the spots.
It’s the outlane. Most people aren’t going to look that closely.
Hopefully you disclosed the condition to the arcade before you sold it.

We haven't set the price yet.

Im afraid im still too dark. Should i wipe most if it off and go a little lighter still?

#13 5 months ago

The problem that I’ve had before is that the clear coat will refract the light differently and change the final colour.

Here’s the process that I’ve used before.
Get a clear plastic film, something sturdy like an overhead protector slide (are those even a thing anymore) not something flimsy like cling wrap. Paint a couple test areas on the plastic sheet, let it dry and then clear coat as you would with the final product. Then take your test sheet to the playfield and set it directly in the area that you’re trying to colour match. If nothing matches, mix up a new batch of colours until it’s perfect.

If there are any hard lines that you are trying to follow, first use an exacto-knife with a fresh blade to LIGHTLY score the wood fibers. It will help stop bleed over and the paint will follow the knife line better than a freehand brush by itself.

Lightly sand after you’ve painted to remove any wood fibres that might have raised up.

Getting the clear coat to match smoothly will be tricky but a light sand up to 2000 grit then buffing will help hide the transition

Best of luck

#15 5 months ago
Quoted from Luckydogg420:

The problem that I’ve had before is that the clear coat will refract the light differently and change the final colour.
Here’s the process that I’ve used before.
Get a clear plastic film, something sturdy like an overhead protector slide (are those even a thing anymore) not something flimsy like cling wrap. Paint a couple test areas on the plastic sheet, let it dry and then clear coat as you would with the final product. Then take your test sheet to the playfield and set it directly in the area that you’re trying to colour match. If nothing matches, mix up a new batch of colours until it’s perfect.
If there are any hard lines that you are trying to follow, first use an exacto-knife with a fresh blade to LIGHTLY score the wood fibers. It will help stop bleed over and the paint will follow the knife line better than a freehand brush by itself.
Lightly sand after you’ve painted to remove any wood fibres that might have raised up.
Getting the clear coat to match smoothly will be tricky but a light sand up to 2000 grit then buffing will help hide the transition
Best of luck

Thank you This is kind of what I've been doing if you look at some of the pictures above I've been using frisket as kind of a guide. That's what I need to do here to check and see if it's going to be close enough color match If I just apply the clear otherwise I can wipe most of it off still and go a little lighter It wasn't too hard to go from really green to mostly blue I'm just mixing a few colors here and not a large space to paint (and its the outlane!) Lol

#16 5 months ago

Also what's the best way to polish this area and the area around it I've got all scratched up?

It's pretty noticeable when you get within 12 inches

#17 5 months ago

I worked for Bill davis for many years when clearing playfields was a newer idea. 1st thing we would do is clean a playfield. Get any wax off. Mylar off. And sand the playfield with a very fine grit just to scuff the surface. Then clear it. Any touchups via airbrush would be on top of the 1st layer of clear. Then do your all your touchups then a final batch of clear coats to finish.

If you screw up you can always remove your touchups without making things worse.

I also recommend doing the entire playfield at once. 1 spot at a time is not only more work than its worth. The end result is not typically great.

#18 5 months ago

I’d wipe the new paint off as best as possible, put the game back together, and leave well enough alone. I just don't think this is your strong suit.

If I'm the arcade buyer I'd rather have an original, working game with patina vs. poor color matching locked in by spot clearcoating. Just be honest with them about the cosmetic condition and hope they aren't bothered enough to back out. Maybe offer a $50 goodwill/oops discount.

#19 5 months ago

Ya wipe it off and before u do anything try it on a any other wood with the paint and clear too find out first if it’s the right one or not then keep trying until it’s really close because the clear will change it

#20 5 months ago
Quoted from yancy:

I would wipe the new paint off as best as possible, put the game back together, and leave well enough alone. Just don't think this is your strong suit.
If I'm the arcade buyer I'd rather have an original, working game with patina vs. poor color matching locked in by spot clearcoating. Just be honest with them about the cosmetic condition and hope they aren't bothered enough to back out. Maybe offer a $50 goodwill/oops discount.

I believe this to be your best course of action here.

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