(Topic ID: 127933)

Pinball Electricity for Dummies


By Star_Gazer

4 years ago



Topic Stats

  • 150 posts
  • 40 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 4 years ago by thedefog
  • Topic is favorited by 52 Pinsiders

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    There are 150 posts in this topic. You are on page 1 of 3.
    36
    #1 4 years ago

    Since i really have trouble understanding most of the electricity stuff, but do have artistic skills. A new thread; Pinball Electricity for Dummies. Gonna create images for understanding pinball electric specific stuff, for myself and maybe for other pinball fans, with your help of course!

    Question nr 1. Light-bulb logic

    Lamps_01.jpg
    #2 4 years ago

    6 volts because there in parallel.

    #3 4 years ago

    More

    #4 4 years ago

    Great idea. How about a real "Pinball Repair For Dummies" book?

    #5 4 years ago
    Quoted from GRUMPY:

    6 volts because there in parallel.

    If i use an 6v adapter for powering the lightbulbs do i need to worry about Amperes? And will the light-bulbs give the same amount of light? So there's parallel and...? (i know, we're talking really NOOB stuff here )
    If is use 100 lights will 6v still be enough? Please explain more, i' will make the images!

    #6 4 years ago

    Question nr 2. It's starting to blur already...

    Lamps_02.jpg
    -2
    #7 4 years ago

    Series 18v

    #8 4 years ago

    That's not series, it's still parallel

    #9 4 years ago

    Your resistor is in backwards.

    #10 4 years ago

    Forgive me as I don't have art skills but the blue line represents series wiring. Also, you spelled parallel wrong

    405579.jpg
    #11 4 years ago

    Edit, you slipped another one in before I could respond to the second one.

    #12 4 years ago

    Your explaining Series and Parallel wiring. But you want to cover other basics. Ohm's law is a good place to start.
    People need to understand voltage vs amperage. And how wiring in series and parallel can impact amps.

    #13 4 years ago

    Can i place a check stamp on this one?...what's up with the " resistor" ?

    Lamps_03.jpg

    #14 4 years ago
    Quoted from BrianZ:

    Ohm's law is a good place to start.

    Can you make a good example based on this pics, since all this stuff is pretty new for me to!

    #15 4 years ago

    this makes no sense?
    the voltage of the battery wont change no matter what way you wire the 3 lamps

    #16 4 years ago
    Quoted from urbanledge:

    the voltage of the battery wont change no matter what way you wire the 3 lamps

    It's more, how much battery power do i need to power the 3 lamps.

    #17 4 years ago

    Wait!? Why isn't the battery leaking all over place with green stuff? That's normally what I see.

    #18 4 years ago

    Lamps = resistors.

    #19 4 years ago

    This is an excellent site that explains basic electricity and related components theory with nice visual examples. It relates to car audio but most of the electrical section is universal.

    http://www.bcae1.com/

    #20 4 years ago

    How do you know the right direction the current flows with these Lamps (resistors) ?

    Lamps_04.jpg
    #21 4 years ago
    Quoted from Star_Gazer:

    A new thread; Pinball Electricity for Dummies.

    Excellent.

    A lot of people don't understand a simple circuit.

    The basics of which can help solve a lot of pinball problems.

    LTG : )™

    #22 4 years ago

    a light bulb is non directional both of those will light

    #23 4 years ago
    Quoted from Star_Gazer:

    How do you know the right direction the current flows with these Lamps (resistors) ?

    Lamps_04.jpg (Click image to enlarge)

    I'm pretty sure resistors/lamps aren't directional. However for LED's polarity does matter because they are diodes.

    #24 4 years ago
    Quoted from pinballlizard:

    a light bulb is non directional both of those will light

    But a resistor works only one way right? Or is a light not really an resistor?

    #25 4 years ago
    Quoted from Star_Gazer:

    But a resistor works only one way right? Or isn't a light not really an resistor?

    An LED is a light emitting DIODE, and polarity matters on diodes because they only allow the flow of current in a single direction.

    Incandescent bulbs are basically resistors, because a filament is just a coil of wire. And resistors are basically just (calculated) coils of wire too.

    #26 4 years ago
    Quoted from urbanledge:

    this makes no sense?
    the voltage of the battery wont change no matter what way you wire the 3 lamps

    Think of Christmas lights. They work on 115VAC yet the bulbs are rated for a much lower voltage. It's because they're wired in series. If you wired them in parallel and plugged it in you would blow every bulb.

    The bulbs are designed to shunt (short) when they fail, to keep the rest of the bulbs lit. If the shunt fails or a bulb is pulled out, the circuit is broken and all lights go out.

    #27 4 years ago
    Quoted from asay:

    I'm pretty sure resistors/lamps aren't directional. However for LED's polarity does matter because they are diodes.

    While this is true pinballs GI is AC.
    The leds have a rectifier in them to convert to DC so polarity doesn't matter.

    #28 4 years ago
    Quoted from dothedoo:

    Think of Christmas lights. They work on 115VAC yet the bulbs are much lower voltage. It's because they're wired in series. If you wired them in parallel and plugged it in you would blow every bulb.
    The bulbs are designed to shunt (short) when they fail to keep the rest of the bulbs lit. If the shunt fails or a bulb is pulled out the circuit is broken and all lights go out.

    Yes. This is correct but either way the voltage doesn't change.

    #29 4 years ago
    Quoted from urbanledge:

    Yes. This is correct but either way the voltage doesn't change.

    I think the graphics were meant to show that if you wired the bulbs in series, you would need an 18v power source for 3 6v bulbs.

    #30 4 years ago
    Quoted from Star_Gazer:

    But a resistor works only one way right? Or is a light not really an resistor?

    Resistors work with current flowing in any direction.

    #31 4 years ago
    Quoted from asay:

    I think the graphics were meant to show that if you wired the bulbs in series, you would need an 18v power source for 3 6v bulbs.

    True!

    #32 4 years ago

    If you phrase the lamp setup differently it makes sense.

    Each lamp has a 6 volt drop from one terminal to the next. If you connect them in series you have three 6V drops, so you need 18v to drive that circuit.

    #33 4 years ago
    Quoted from Wolfmarsh:

    If you phrase the lamp setup differently it makes sense.
    Each lamp has a 6 volt drop from one terminal to the next. If you connect them in series you have three 6V drops, so you need 18v to drive that circuit.

    A 6v lamp doesn't drop 6v unless it's wired to a 6v source. All 3 lamps in series drop 2 volts apiece and will be very dim. In parallel they will each drop 6v but pull more amps from the battery and drain it quicker

    #34 4 years ago
    Quoted from Mbecker:

    A 6v lamp doesn't drop 6v unless it's wired to a 6v source. All 3 lamps in series drop 2 volts apiece and will be very dim. In parallel they will each drop 6v but pull more amps from the battery and drain it quicker

    Yes, but to properly drive the circuit you need to supply 18V. The bulbs were intended for 6V (well, close to that, but for this teaching purpose lets keep the math simple). That's why I phrased it the way I did.

    To elaborate on what Mbecker is saying, the total voltage drop of one of your battery circuits above will always be equal to the voltage of the battery. The circuit WANTS to be at equilibrium. So if you have two lamps in series on a 9V battery, there will be approximately a 4.5V drop on each bulb.

    #35 4 years ago
    Quoted from Star_Gazer:

    How do you know the right direction the current flows with these Lamps (resistors) ?

    You have #4 backwards positive voltage always goes to the center pin.

    Quoted from Star_Gazer:Can you make a good example based on this pics, since all this stuff is pretty new for me to!

    If you are using a #44 bulb, it would be 6.3volts @ .25 amps.
    Three #44 bulbs in parallel would be 6.3 volts @ .75 amps.
    Three bulbs in series would be 18.9 volts @ .25 amps.

    #36 4 years ago
    Quoted from GRUMPY:

    You have #4 backwards positive voltage always goes to the center pin.

    Like this? since we don't often use batteries for pinball i've changed this into a power supply. (and added your comment to the picture!)

    Lamps_05.jpg

    #37 4 years ago
    Quoted from Star_Gazer:

    Can i place a check stamp on this one?...what's up with the " resistor" ?
    Lamps_03.jpg (Click image to enlarge)

    This image has correct parallel circuit on the left and correct series circuit on the right. I would change the parallel one to be more like the red and green lines in picture 2, its easier to see the parallel nature of the circuit for most people drawn that way.

    As other have said, incandescent lamps are basically resistors. If you have several of the same in parallel, your voltage will be the same to each bulb but the current draw (amps) will go up. For example, in your circuit with 3 bulbs, if each is a standard #44 pinball bulb, each is 6.3V (call it 6v) and draw .25 amps. So your parallel circuit will draw 3 X .25A = .75A at 6V

    The series circuit will need 3 X 6V = 18V but since they are in series, the current is the same as one at .25A

    #38 4 years ago

    And this one should be correct now.

    Lamps_06.jpg
    #39 4 years ago

    Difference between Parallel and Series:

    Lamps_08.jpg
    #40 4 years ago

    Count me a member of the club that needs lessons!

    #41 4 years ago

    It would be prettier if 6.9 V was 6.3 V in the picture (lamps_08.jpg) , but it's close enough.

    #42 4 years ago

    OP I don't want to rain on your parade but you are a person who has "trouble understanding that electricity stuff" yet you want to provide a guide for people who also have trouble understanding that electricity stuff too? And inviting comments/suggestions from other members of the group some of whom clearly have a little trouble understanding that electricity stuff too???

    It's gonna be a long road.....

    Andy

    #43 4 years ago
    Quoted from Andy_B:

    It's gonna be a long road.....

    I know...but I'm sure with help from the Pro's we can do (and understand) it together! Also the comments of some member with lesser knowledge (like me) show clearly the more difficult material...but yeah it's a long road.

    #45 4 years ago

    Better off starting here... and then referring to Clays docs, http://www.pinrepair.com/ and the PinWiki site for pinball specific tutorials. Learn the electronics basics first, then as they apply to pinball.

    9780470147047_l.jpg
    #46 4 years ago
    Quoted from Star_Gazer:

    Difference between Parallel and Series:

    The parallel transformer should read 6.3 volts. Nice drawings by the way.

    #47 4 years ago
    Quoted from GRUMPY:

    The parallel transformer should read 6.3 volts. Nice drawings by the way.

    Maybe he is accounting for losses/voltage drop

    #48 4 years ago
    Quoted from GRUMPY:

    should read 6.3 volts.

    Don't know much of electronics yet but at least I've learned not to upload images with typos...

    Lamps_09.jpg

    #49 4 years ago

    Correct if i say series connection is mainly used for global lighting (plastics etc) and Parallel more for event type of lighting?

    #50 4 years ago

    Series is used for x-mas trees only

    Characteristic of series is that all lamps go out.
    S_G, here is a exercise for you with a series connection and the middle lamp is blown.
    serie -lamp out.jpg

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