(Topic ID: 346064)

PIN2K Ducksan to Wells gardner Conversion, Help needed

By Rene368

6 months ago


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  • Latest reply 5 months ago by Rene368
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#1 6 months ago

I'm in need of help. This is going to be a long read.
My Ducksan chassis has killed itself by wear on one of the high voltage wires (Focus Wire).
This wire has shorted to the grounded chassis. It killed two resistors (R333 and R334) and probably the flyback, not sure on the last one.
When it happened the whole machine turned off (so it looked). No image, now lights just darkness. And a pleasant smell of burned electronics hit your nose.
No fuse was broken, this is probably as this short was happening after the flyback and the fuse is before the flyback.
Now I tried to fix this wire twice, but this would not help as the high voltage would make it's way to the chassis. You could hear and see the purple corona discharge. I turned it off quickly (within 1 sec of turning the machine on and hearing the discharge sound).

Now I replaced the the Ducksan with a Wells Gardner i've got my hands on. It was working when it came from the machine and had been laying on the shelf for ~8years. I placed this on the Ducksan chassis for mounting and connected everything.
Hooked the machine to power and turned it on. Now I got the normal crackling sounds for degaussing and the high voltage high pitched noise (I can hear this, yes). The screen also turned a little greyish, so I call this good as the high voltage is present on the screen. I think the Ducksan did the same.
But after about 30 seconds when the computer was booted and all the lights started flashing on the playfield, but I still did not have an image. Sad!
Not even one pixel lid up.

Now I'm not that deep into the inner working of CRT, but I do like the CRT much more over LCD and would like to get it back working.
I could imagine this could be easy like the neg-pos switch on the Wells gardner, but if this is the case I wouldn't get even a distorted image when testing?

Is there someone that can help me diagnose if this is fixable? Would like to get my CRT back working and my RFM back playing, as it is out of the running for over a year now. Thanks!

Datasheet Ducksan:
http://www.pinball2000.de/scans/ducksan02.pdf
Datasheet Wells Gardner:
http://www.pinball2000.de/scans/wellsg02.pdf

Flyback RFM (resized).jpgFlyback RFM (resized).jpg
#2 6 months ago

Bump.

I tried the sync button. It was on positive and switched it to negative.
No different. Still no picture.
One thing I noticed was some white line on the upper and lower edge of the screen 2 times.

Could someone take a picture how their button is switched?
Also a picture of the signal input connector? Thanks.

I get the feeling I wired something wrong

#3 6 months ago

Way over my head here but hoping to help however I can. I did a chassis swap on my RFM monitor as I had some strange Italian chassis (not WG or Ducksan) but an original (I believe) Samsung tube. The key to finding another chassis that would work was confirming the neck pin arrangement/size and measuring the ohm values of the yoke/confirming they work with your tube. I had someone who was MUCH more experienced with CRTs walk me through it. Good luck!

#4 6 months ago

Most standard arcade monitors are 15khz.

I suspect that the Wells you found is something other than the 19K7302 that was used in these games, and might be an arcade monitor that you are trying to drive with the wrong resolution.

Unlike LCD's video monitors don't 'adapt' to other resolutions (tri-mode monitors allow three different resolutions, and do switch between them, but they aren't something you could use here...).

So, first is that you need a wells monitor made for this resolution. Is your monitor a 19K7302?

If not, you need to get a monitor capable of displaying the video output of the game.

I'm not familiar with the sync wiring here, but normally Wells monitors will either have a vga plug, or they will have a 6-pin a space and a three pin. The wiring of this .156 connector is usually Red-Green-Blue, Next pin is either ground, or left not connected, then it's POSITIVE Vertical Sync, POSITIVE Horitzontal Sync. This concludes the six pin side. Now there is an open pin (key pin), then it's Ground (this is frequently the ground connection, but you can use this ground pin or the one next to the blue, they are electrically the same). Then it's NEGATIVE Vertical Sync, then the pin furthest from the red is NEGATIVE Horitzontal Sync.

The usual video game connection for a Wells Gardner goes like this:
Red
Green
Blue
(Not Connected)
(Not Connected)
(Not Connected)
KEY (Not connected of course...)
GROUND
(Not Connected) If two sync wires are available, this could be connected, but the bulk of arcade games don't use the Negative Vertical Sync.
NEGATIVE Horitzontal sync (the pin furthest from Red)

Finally, if your wells monitor is the correct sync rate for your Pinball 2000, the capacitors are thirty years old unless they've been changed, and you might have to install a cap kit to get it working.

Good luck!

#5 6 months ago
Quoted from PinRetail:

So, first is that you need a wells monitor made for this resolution. Is your monitor a 19K7302?

Yes, It is. It came from an RFM and the Williams serial number sticker is still on it.
I attached the pinout from the manual as a picture. It has a 10p connector.

Quoted from PinRetail:

The usual video game connection for a Wells Gardner goes like this:

I added a picture of how I connected everything, hope this helps. Left was the Ducksan pinout and right is the Wells Gardner pinout. The chassis ground is on the board also connected to the ground of the whole board.
So these are electrically the same.

Quoted from PinRetail:

If two sync wires are available, this could be connected, but the bulk of arcade games don't use the Negative Vertical Sync.
NEGATIVE Horitzontal sync (the pin furthest from Red)

So I have a H-sync and V-sync wire in the cable, and connected them to the WG chassis to respectfully H/S and V/S.
So it is interesting you say I do not need a V-sync wire. This would be the reason I would like to get a picture of a fellow PIN2K owner how their WG chassis is connected.

Quoted from PinRetail:

Finally, if your wells monitor is the correct sync rate for your Pinball 2000, the capacitors are thirty years old unless they've been changed, and you might have to install a cap kit to get it working.

So it should be the correct sync rate, as it's from a PIN2K machine. The capacitors have been replaced. I'm not sure if all of them have been replaced, but at least the bigger ones are new.

DS on WG (resized).jpgDS on WG (resized).jpgWG pinout (resized).jpgWG pinout (resized).jpg
#6 6 months ago

Nice work here!

You definitely know your stuff.

As for why you might not need a negative Vsync wire, most video games actually send 'composite' sync on the HSync wire, thus it's common on Wells Gardner monitor to be connected to a single sync wire, on the opposite end of the plug from the red color wire. If you've got two sync wires, just use both Hsync and Vsync, as you have done. And you are correct, positive or negative sync should still display a picture of some kind, it might be rolling, it might be just horizontal bars, but if you've got ground and color signals, the 'freewheeling' frequency of the monitor should display something.

Odds are overwhelmingly good that if you can tell some of your capacitors aren't 'factory', someone has done a complete recap on this monitor, and it should be displaying a picture just fine.

Yup, you might have to push the button for positive or negative sync to 'lock' the picture in, but everything here should be working.

So we are back where we started... could be monitor, could be game not sending a signal to the monitor.

Because we have done as much as you can with the monitor until you have some other video signal to display, my next step would be to look into the various posts about LCD replacements, not as a replacement necessarily, but as a test. If you can get an image on an LCD you know the problem is the monitor.

Let us know what you find!

#7 6 months ago
Quoted from PinRetail:

Nice work here!
You definitely know your stuff.

We'll I do know a bit about electronics, just not the complete picture (haha, fun) of a CRT.

Quoted from PinRetail:

Nice work here!
Odds are overwhelmingly good that if you can tell some of your capacitors aren't 'factory', someone has done a complete recap on this monitor, and it should be displaying a picture just fine.

So almost all capacitors have had their solder retouched. So I figured they have been changed in the past. But might be wrong.
Could a bad capacitor cause the image to not display anything?

Quoted from PinRetail:

Nice work here!
Yup, you might have to push the button for positive or negative sync to 'lock' the picture in, but everything here should be working.
So we are back where we started... could be monitor, could be game not sending a signal to the monitor.

I think negative sync should be it. As I believe the pc will output a negative sync. Now I have measured the outputs of the PC with an oscilloscope and have found that there is a Red, Green and Blue signal. The same is true for the sync signals. I will go back to the machine tomorrow and grab an image of the signals, maybe someone can tell me if this is right.
I also will have a look if the heater is working (orange glow) as per the wells gardner service manual. I did measure the heater pins on the CRT, this was 2,7ohm. This sounds good to me, it's at least not O.L. on the meter.

Quoted from PinRetail:

Nice work here!
Because we have done as much as you can with the monitor until you have some other video signal to display, my next step would be to look into the various posts about LCD replacements, not as a replacement necessarily, but as a test. If you can get an image on an LCD you know the problem is the monitor.
Let us know what you find!

I have ordered a CGA to VGA converter so I can rule out some things and test if there is an image from the PC.
This swap should not be this hard I believe. Hope to get it back working.

#8 6 months ago
Quoted from Rene368:

So almost all capacitors have had their solder retouched.

If anyone of those caps have a code or other identifyables on them you can sometimes give yourself a date on when they were replaced, to help with troubleshooting before potential replacement.

#9 6 months ago

I measured the H-sync and V-sync from the PC. They look good to me (15.7kHz and 60Hz).
Also I could measure a signal for Red, Green and Blue, so this is also good.
I also took a look at the neck to see if the heater is working, surprise it was....
What coud I check next?

Eerste sync H-sync (resized).pngEerste sync H-sync (resized).pngTweede sync V-sync (resized).pngTweede sync V-sync (resized).png20231106_190152 (resized).jpg20231106_190152 (resized).jpg
#10 6 months ago

If it's a 15Khz sync signal, you should be able to plug that monitor into a different video source (almost all arcade games use 15Khz) and test it.

But, honestly, it appears that you are going to need monitor repair.

The pinball forums are not likely going to be the best place to get attention from people who regularly repair arcade monitors, maybe on various other forums you can get better help.

I personally can put a cap kit in a monitor, but when it appears to be a problem with the color chip that drives the Red, Green and Blue signals, I send the chassis (not the picture tube) to:

PnL Inc.
1572 W. San Bernardino Rd
Covina CA 91722
800-992-6588

A couple of things. Of course you have heater voltage with a nice glow. You said you saw glimmers of white lines on the monitor, so you have high voltage, and heater voltage. You wouldn't get any glimmer of light if you didn't have high voltage and neckboard glow.

This is WAY basic for you, I'm sure... but the flyback has two adjustment knobs. You can turn the bottom knob and you should get a grey screen that you can increase the brightness until it turns white (grey is enough for a check). The bottom knob is frequently hot glued so that it doesn't turn easily. A very little goes a long way with this 'screen voltage' adjustment. Turn this up, maybe you can get a picture. (This is very basic stuff here, and I'm sure you have done this...). I said the flyback has two knobs, the top one is focus. No need to adjust that until you have a picture.

Turning the screen voltage up this way shows that the monitor is capable of displaying a 'raster' and is a good start.

Not for you, but for anybody in the future looking at this thread, I'll list how I approach a monitor that doesn't have a picture:

Am I getting voltage to the plug of the monitor? 115V?
Do I have the video signal plugged in? Is the game providing a video signal?
Do I have static crackle when I turn the monitor on? Heat sink glow?
I take the adjustment board, turn the brightness to 75%, contrast to 75%.
I turn the 'screen pot' (lower pot on the flyback) up a little until I get either a picture or a raster with small grey horitzontal lines.
I back the 'screen pot' off until the black areas of the screen are just barely fully black (not pale grey) and the horitzontal lines have disappeared.
Then, presuming I've got a picture from the game I proceed to adjust the focus and the Red, Green, and Blue pots on the neckboard until I like the color with small tweaks to contrast and brightness as needed.

You are likely at the 'I get a raster with a greyish screen and small horitzontal 'retrace' lines, but aren't getting the game video signal to show up'.

That's where I pull the chassis, and send it to PnL.

Good luck!

#11 6 months ago
Quoted from PinRetail:

Am I getting voltage to the plug of the monitor? 115V?
Do I have the video signal plugged in? Is the game providing a video signal?
Do I have static crackle when I turn the monitor on? Heat sink glow?
I take the adjustment board, turn the brightness to 75%, contrast to 75%.
I turn the 'screen pot' (lower pot on the flyback) up a little until I get either a picture or a raster with small grey horitzontal lines.
I back the 'screen pot' off until the black areas of the screen are just barely fully black (not pale grey) and the horitzontal lines have disappeared.
Then, presuming I've got a picture from the game I proceed to adjust the focus and the Red, Green, and Blue pots on the neckboard until I like the color with small tweaks to contrast and brightness as needed.
You are likely at the 'I get a raster with a greyish screen and small horitzontal 'retrace' lines, but aren't getting the game video signal to show up'.
That's where I pull the chassis, and send it to PnL.
Good luck!

I first connected a GBS-8220 from the PC to an LCD. I got some sort of shifting and it didn't sync. This could be due to the missing IC (74LS02), but i've read with this version it should just work and sync without IC?
GBS8220

Then I connected the PC to and Eizo monitor from 2004 that can't fully sync to it, but will display the image anyway with an signal error for the horizontal sync. This looked good.
Eizo monitor:

Lastly I connected the Wells Gardner again.
I followed your steps as I didn't try adjusting anything (remember this came from a working set, but is now connected to a Ducksan tube).
I could see an image! The screen is very purple/blue and again it's not syncing. But you can see the RFM text of the attract modein the video, so there is hope. Hopefully we can work from here.
Wells Gardner:

The intersting thing I find is the GBS-8220 image looks the same as the Wells Gardner, a rolling image. I don't know why the Eizo is syncing correctly.

Clicking the button on the chassis for positive or negative sync didn't do anything to the image. Nothing happened. Didn't expected that. Would have tought on positive the image would disappear.

#12 6 months ago
Quoted from Rene368:

Clicking the button on the chassis for positive or negative sync didn't do anything to the image. Nothing happened. Didn't expected that. Would have thought on positive the image would disappear.

A few things, that probably are clear for you, but not for me. I'm pretty sure we are just now hearing that there is a missing chip? A 74LS02? Obviously, if this is the part of the game circuit that sends sync to the monitor... (grins).

LCD monitors vary. Sometimes they will correctly presume that a signal that has a vertical frequency of ... comes in without a Horizontal signal will have to be a 320x200 picture... and they just lock in by presuming that's what you want. Other LCD monitors won't presume the horizontal frequency, they might display nothing, or show a signal without horizontal sync at some random resolution.

CRT monitors 'freewheel'. They are pulsing at approximately the correct frequency. There is a circuit that 'locks in' the sync if present. (While I'm usually the guy who 'knows something about monitors' at most of the shops I've worked at, it's a testament for how little I know that I only vaguely think that this is a Phase-Locked-Loop circuit(?). Honestly, I couldn't tell you. I'm not a monitor guy... I'm just a guy who has gotten a lot of monitors working...)

Because your sync is negative, I would go ahead and move the connection on your video plug off of the positive sync locations. The switch SHOULD reverse it just fine, but it is one less thing to be non-standard in your game in the future. Don't want to confuse future technicians.

Then I'd ONLY connect the sync wire furthest from the red wire (Horz negative). Many video signals are 'composite negative' and actually distort the sync signal if you attach both. They shouldn't, but it's a quick thing to try when you are moving the wires. You probably will want both wires, but try connecting the negative Horizontal sync first, test it, and then attach the Vertical sync wire right next to it and see which gives you better results.

Dial in the freewheeling frequency as close as you can while the screen is rolling/tearing, using your Hsync and Vsync controls on the monitor. The control board has the Vertical marked 'V-Hold'. The Horizontal is on the main chassis board, and might be marked 'Horz OSC VR301'.

Sync signals are bog standard logic level pulses. You need a good ground, and then the sync wires are pulled high by pull up resistor, and the pulses from the chip pull the signal low for the duration of the pulse.

Given that you have dim video, and poor sync, maybe your ground connection should be looked at.

There are two color pots each one of the three colors.

To get your monitor to have a less purplish red color, there is a small guide here:

https://www.arcadecollecting.com/info/Adjusting_monitor_color.txt

I set Brightness and Contrast to 80%.

In your case, I'd drop the cut off for blue down, and the cut off for green up.

At this point I set the drive pots for R G B to equal, maybe at 75%, mostly leaving them where they are, but turned to be alike in case someone else was fiddling and has the balance really screwed up.

Once I have the drive colors turned to the same position, I adjust the screen pot on the flyback to just barely showing retrace lines.

I adjust the cut-off R G B until things are properly very light grey in the black sections of the screen. Then, once I have that, I adjust the drive R G B as needed to get the color intensity I want. This will still have a very faint retrace line visible all over the screen and the parts of the picture that should be black are still faintly illuminated.

Finally, I back off the screen control until the retrace lines disappear, making the light grey turn dark black in the picture. Deep blacks are the secret to vivid colors.

This can be done while the screen still isn't synced, and it gives you a pretty picture to look at while you figure out why things aren't syncing.

Note that if you are missing green entirely, it could be a bad green transistor on the neck board, or bad connection, but it's also highly likely that your picture tube just won't display green anymore, or won't display it brightly. You can only push the 'Cut off' and 'Drive' so far.

When the 'guns' for Red, Green, and Blue are failing, in theory you can 'rejuvenate' a CRT... but this usually only gives you a couple more months. The good news about 'rejuvenating' a CRT is that the unit tells you right away if your tube is done. It usually is, and no amount of chassis repair will make a tube with poor color guns display a good picture. In this case, your CRT needs to be thrown away.

This kind of stuff is a bit of a journey. That you have some signal at all is encouraging.

#13 6 months ago
Quoted from PinRetail:

A few things, that probably are clear for you, but not for me. I'm pretty sure we are just now hearing that there is a missing chip? A 74LS02? Obviously, if this is the part of the game circuit that sends sync to the monitor... (grins).

This is only for the GBS-8220 converter I tested to verify if the PC is sending signal. I've read the GBS-8200 needs the chip and the GBS-8220 doesn't, but i'm not sure as it will not sync on this GBS converter board either.

Quoted from PinRetail:

Because your sync is negative, I would go ahead and move the connection on your video plug off of the positive sync locations. The switch SHOULD reverse it just fine, but it is one less thing to be non-standard in your game in the future. Don't want to confuse future technicians.
Then I'd ONLY connect the sync wire furthest from the red wire (Horz negative). Many video signals are 'composite negative' and actually distort the sync signal if you attach both. They shouldn't, but it's a quick thing to try when you are moving the wires. You probably will want both wires, but try connecting the negative Horizontal sync first, test it, and then attach the Vertical sync wire right next to it and see which gives you better results.
Dial in the freewheeling frequency as close as you can while the screen is rolling/tearing, using your Hsync and Vsync controls on the monitor. The control board has the Vertical marked 'V-Hold'. The Horizontal is on the main chassis board, and might be marked 'Horz OSC VR301'.
Sync signals are bog standard logic level pulses. You need a good ground, and then the sync wires are pulled high by pull up resistor, and the pulses from the chip pull the signal low for the duration of the pulse.
Given that you have dim video, and poor sync, maybe your ground connection should be looked at.

So you are saying I need to only connect the H-sync wire and test with this first. Then only the V-sync wire and test again and see which is nicer?
Moving the sync wires to the other terminal does nothing on this particalur chassis, as these are electrically the same. The switch will just make it positive or negative. Also the silkscreen on the board just says two times V/S and H/S. No + or - is in front of this.
Freewheeling frequency is a new word for me. The V-hold I tested and didn't do it in terms of syncing correctly. The H-hold will be on the main board, but this is not reachable in the machine. Which is stupid, as I have not other way of testing this monitor as this is our only machine with a CRT. I don't like the high voltages present on the main board...
The grounds should be solid, but I could check this.

The Ducksan tube was a little bad at showing green, so would not be suprised to hear this is failing.
Before turning the color pots. I will get the Wells Gardner tube I got with the wells gardner unit. I got this wells gardner main board including monitor to fix the dim green. So I swapped the tube at the time but kept the Ducksan main board as this was working. When the Ducksan main board failed I put the ducksan tube back in, as I did not know if messing with the flyback could harm the tube and the Ducksan tube was already less good.
When I swap the tubes (so wells gardner tube with wells gardner chassis) I will take a look at how the picture looks then and hopefully your VR301 Horz OSC has done the trick for the sync problem. Will test this and come back to you. Thank you for al your tips!
First Dutch Pinball Open expo this weekend (this is not even on the event list, weird) then I have time to test sync and swap tubes.

#14 6 months ago
Quoted from Rene368:

So you are saying I need to only connect the H-sync wire and test with this first. Then only the V-sync wire and test again and see which is nicer?

Yes. Because of the convention used extensively with video monitors of providing composite negative sync on the Hsync line. I definitely have had video games connected to Wells Gardner CRT monitors where connecting both the Vsync and Hsync lines made the game far harder to get a sync to lock in or didn't allow the sync to lock in. Attaching only the Horz line made the game lock in easily. Either only using the Hsync line will make it easier to completely lock the sync, or you'll need both to get the picture to stop rolling.

Quoted from Rene368:

Moving the sync wires to the other terminal does nothing on this particular chassis, as these are electrically the same. The switch will just make it positive or negative.

Yes. If the sync is coming in as negative, putting it on the negative terminals where a negative sync is expected to be plugged in only has the effect of not confusing the next technician. The switch should have been able to make this work, which is why I didn't think too much about it. As a repair progresses and it becomes more likely that someone will be following up on what I'm seeing, I often do a little housekeeping... making sure that the negative sync is connected to the negative sync pins of the plug is just to keep things tidy.

Quoted from Rene368:

Freewheeling frequency

Yeah. It's the way CRT chassis are made cheaply. There is some design stuff here, but if you completely disconnect the sync signals from a CRT you can still get a recognizable picture through the Horz and Vert controls. It'll roll... slowly. It'll not have clean edges that are straight up and down due to horz tearing, but it'll be recognizable if you get the 'freewheeling' frequency close enough to the frequency the game puts out.

Quoted from Rene368:

The H-hold will be on the main board, but this is not reachable in the machine. Which is stupid, as I have not other way of testing this monitor as this is our only machine with a CRT. I don't like the high voltages present on the main board...

You and all other technicians. Old versions of the Wells 7000 series did have the Horz control on the control board. There probably is a very good reason to not do that, due to signal skew, electrical noise, the countermeasures you might have design into the circuit in case someone disconnects the plug to the external control board... something that engineers and the cost control people decided wasn't worth it.

For the 'unreachable' issue, I have a small flat bladed screwdriver that I put a piece of shrink wrap on, leaving only about 1/16 of an inch of the screwdriver blade exposed. I use an extension mirror and a flashlight to guide my screwdriver. Many technicians have paid for all-plastic adjustment tools. Monitors can be quite a painful thing to have to adjust.

I'd look at extending the power and the connectors to the monitor with long lengths of wire, so that you can set the monitor outside the machine and make the adjustments. I always tell myself that I need to do this... and then I end up just gutting it out, and doing everything with the monitor in game.

Voltages in a monitor can KILL YOU. The big danger is under the suction cup and the fat red wire and the solder terminals right under the flyback. Still, there is a reason why there are very few of us dealing with CRT monitors. It's frequently uncomfortable, dangerous and frustrating.

Wait... you are putting a different manufacturer's monitor chassis on a tube other than the chassis that was made for that tube?

Brave man.

There are variations in the yoke. Frequently this won't work at all. In order to swap a tube, the standard thing is you have to remove the magnetic yoke and keep the yoke with the chassis it is matched to. Each yoke has a different characteristic, and it's rare to find one manufacturer's yoke with exactly the specifications that the other manufacturer's chassis demands. Swapping the tube to a different model chassis in my experience has required the original yoke be pulled, and then attached to the different glass. Then there is an extensive and very difficult convergence procedure that always looks worse than what the factory had. Even then, there are vast charts of CRT characteristics to find out if yokes should be used with various tubes.

This is quite a lucky thing, if you can get the picture to be correct using a different manufacturer's yoke.

The usual difficulty is that you absolutely cannot get the picture to have good geometry, no matter what you do. The picture won't go right far enough, it won't adjust wide enough, it won't adjust without 'pincushion'. The geometry of the screen is tightly determined by the specific magnetic characteristics of the yoke, and the model of the chassis you have has been specifically designed so that it will display a proper picture on the yoke it expects.

Short answer... attaching a different yoke part number to a chassis is bad juju.

But it won't affect the sync, and it appears that you are within the adjustment range to get the picture right.

Sounds like you've got a lucky coincidence... having two different yokes within each chassis' adjustment range.

Quoted from Rene368:

did not know if messing with the flyback could harm the tube

In general, no. You can turn the brightness so far up on the flyback screen control that you wear out the tube quicker, but in general, the flyback adjustment doesn't blow up the tube, though it can trip the overvoltage circuit in the chassis and shut the monitor chassis down.

#15 6 months ago
Quoted from PinRetail:

Short answer... attaching a different yoke part number to a chassis is bad juju.
But it won't affect the sync, and it appears that you are within the adjustment range to get the picture right.
Sounds like you've got a lucky coincidence... having two different yokes within each chassis' adjustment range.

The tubes are of the same brand and the jokes are also the same in value. We measured before we swapped it.
Everything was working fine and you could get the pictures geometry also perfect, till the ducksan decided to kill itself. I get the feeling alot of WG schematics have been copied for the ducksan chassis, as there are some things the same. So even the yoke is interchangeable between the original PIN2K Ducksan and WG K7302.

I will swap the tube back, as I think the Ducksan tube is less good. That's why it's so dark. But will see.
Now if only the H-sync doesn't work and only V-sync doesn't work, how to make C-sync with the V and H-sync wires to test if this works?

2 weeks later
#16 5 months ago

Swapped the tubes. This one may be a hair brighter.
I tried the V-Hold pot (VR723) and the HORZ-OSC pot (VR301) and got the vertical rolling (up to down) to stop eventually.
The horizontal rolling (left to right) would still be present. I could get it to stop almost when pushing on the pot, but when released it would go back rolling again. The same for the vertical rolling. It would just start rolling after about 20 sec.


Could it be an IC that's bad or the pots out of value? Or is there still a possibility that there are bad caps?
At the moment i'm not sure how to test any futher.

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Super Skill Shot Shop
 
$ 11.95
Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
ULEKstore
 
$ 1.00
Pinball Machine
Pinball Alley
 
$ 8.99
Cabinet - Other
Inscribed Solutions
 
$ 234.99
Cabinet - (Alt) Translites
Cento Creations
 
4,100
Machine - For Sale
Bethlehem, PA
$ 135.00
Cabinet - Shooter Rods
Super Skill Shot Shop
 
€ 130.00
Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
Pino Pinball Mods Shop
 
$ 84.99
Playfield - Decals
FlyLand Designs
 
$ 69.50
Boards
Pinball Haus
 
$ 120.00
Cabinet - Shooter Rods
Super Skill Shot Shop
 
$ 46.99
Lighting - Interactive
Lee's Parts
 
4,400
Machine - For Sale
Anderson, SC
Hey modders!
Your shop name here

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