(Topic ID: 289082)

Pencil Airbrush Recommendation for playfield restore

By zermeno68

7 months ago


Topic Heartbeat

Topic Stats

  • 16 posts
  • 10 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 7 months ago by zermeno68
  • Topic is favorited by 6 Pinsiders

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#1 7 months ago

I do not believe I see a thread that specifically talked about type of airbrushes people use restoring playfields.

I have Bronco I want to eventually restore the playfield to "like-new" condition.

NOTE: I've never used an airbrush in my life (software engineer here), but I am willing to practice a lot on "projects" before I attempt to restore the target playfield.

What airbrushes do you use to restore your games? Which pencil airbrush should I buy?

#2 7 months ago

Most of the airbrush work in pinball restoration is dumping paint uniformly (and lightly!) onto a masked area. So I am not sure the quality of the airbrush is that important. I have been using a 0.5mm needle size since I am primarily trying to get even light coverage over a masked area.

I use an Iwata that I bought in a kit: https://www.iwata-airbrush.com/airbrush-sets-kits.html

As for paint, many people swear by Createx paint. I am using Golden High Flow due to the variety of colours and their online Golden Color Mixer.

#3 7 months ago
Quoted from dr_nybble:

Most of the airbrush work in pinball restoration is dumping paint uniformly (and lightly!) onto a masked area. So I am not sure the quality of the airbrush is that important. I have been using a 0.5mm needle size since I am primarily trying to get even light coverage over a masked area.
I use an Iwata that I bought in a kit: https://www.iwata-airbrush.com/airbrush-sets-kits.html
As for paint, many people swear by Createx paint. I am using Golden High Flow due to the variety of colours and their online Golden Color Mixer.

You could get a cheap compressor for like $100 and a Neo for $60. Much cheaper this way and still gets the job done excellently. Just FYI for saving some dough

#4 7 months ago

Thanks for your inputs especially the kits. Gives me an idea what is available in the market.

So, regarding compressors. I have an old standing Craftsman 20 Gallon unit that can go to 175+ PSI which I imagine is overkill for a pencil airbrush, but it has a regulator knob I can dial in.

I can use my compressor in conjunction with an pencil airbrush? That would save me some $$$ that I can apply to the airbrush.

#5 7 months ago
Quoted from zermeno68:

Thanks for your inputs especially the kits. Gives me an idea what is available in the market.
So, regarding compressors. I have an old standing Craftsman 20 Gallon unit that can go to 175+ PSI which I imagine is overkill for a pencil airbrush. The compressor does have a regulator I can turn to control how much pressure is in the compressor.

I can use my compressor in conjunction with an pencil airbrush? That would save me some $$$ that I can apply to the airbrush.

#6 7 months ago

Also, is there a Pro/Con to a gravity fed pencil airbrush vs the airbrush that has the container below the pencil (sorry, cannot figure out the term they use for these types of airbrushes).

Still learning.

#7 7 months ago

Be sure to get a moisture trap for your compressor line. I've had a Paasche double action since the 80s. It's a workhorse. I'm not sure how the current models compare, though.

#8 7 months ago
Quoted from zombywoof:

Be sure to get a moisture trap for your compressor line. I've had a Paasche double action since the 80s. It's a workhorse. I'm not sure how the current models compare, though.

Thanks for the suggestion!!

#9 7 months ago

If you are masking off and looking for an even coat, the cheapy HF kit is priced right:
https://www.harborfreight.com/quick-change-airbrush-kit-93506.html

If you're being more "artistic", it won't work, because it just blasts.

#10 7 months ago

I recommend getting a gravity fed airbrush. They're around $20 on amazon. The syphon feed airbrush is going to give you more problems (viscosity of paint, air pressure settings, pick-up tube, etc). I'm sure others will have varying opinions, but I've used 3 different brand syphon style, and then switched to gravity, and won't be going back.

Your large air compressor will be just fine (although way overkill). You usually only need 20-40 psi for airbrush, and very little volume. As mentioned, get the moisture filter.

#11 7 months ago

Gravity fed all the way

#12 7 months ago

I use a harbor freight air brush compressor because its small, quite and has the water seperator that comes with it. https://www.harborfreight.com/1-5-hp-58-psi-compressor-and-airbrush-kit-95630.html
and a badger 150 air brush syphon type and never had a problem plus its easy to clean and change colors

#13 7 months ago

On a slightly related note, has anyone figured out a way to reproduce the "zip tone" paint style where shading is achieved by using many small dots in varying densities to go darker or lighter?

#14 7 months ago

I am afraid that you will have to resort to screen printing to have any hope of reproducing a decent halftone. Art supply stores used to sell dry transfer halftone sheets in various shades and gradients, but it only came in black (camera ready), and was very fragile.

#15 7 months ago

Look at a Badger Sotar 2020. I use in my modeling and love it... nice adjustment on line width etc

#16 7 months ago

Thanks guys for all the comments and airbrush suggestions. I prefer to start my airbrush research from those in the hobby I am trying to target my usage. I'll take this information and run with it to see where it goes.

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