(Topic ID: 206523)

Pecos' Gottlieb 1952 Queen of Hearts Restoration


By Pecos

2 years ago



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  • 23 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 1 year ago by PinballFever
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14
#1 2 years ago

It's the beginning of a new year, the perfect time to start a new project! Never mind the fact that I have three other Project Pins in various stages of restoration and dissasembly.

First things first. How did I find a Gottlieb 1952 Queen of Hearts?

I was given the name and number of an older couple wanting to sell an old woodrail machine here in Tucson. Mrs. Seller told me about the pin. It is called Queen of Hearts. I told her that woodrails typically go from $200 to $400.

I would like to own a woodrail but I wasn't sure if this was the one. I asked RyanClaytor and he said, in no uncertain terms, YES, buy it. Queen of Hearts is highly collectible.

Mrs. Seller and I arranged to see it. I told her that it is a desirable game for collectors. Later in the day I went over there to see it. Mr. and Mrs. Seller met me in the stall of their garage. The backglass was toast. The playfield glass had been broken by his neighbor earlier in the day. But the rest of the machine was in great shape. The playfield, pop bumper and passive bumpers are in exceptional condition for a pinball machine 65 years old.

I told Mr. Seller that he could probably sell it for more to a collector in Phoenix. He told me that "We want to sell it to you." I had sent a link of my Pecos Pinball Website to Mrs. Seller. She must have read some of it and seen my restoration work because that is why they wanted me to have the Queen of Hearts.

Not only did I get it for a very reasonable price, but Mr. Seller wanted me to take it home that day even though I didn't have the cash in hand.

This is how it looked on Day One:

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And then, one of the Pinsiders offered to sell me his nice looking backglass for a very reasonable price. This was a no brainer. I could wait years and never find another backglass that looked this nice for such a reasonable price. I told him I would take him up on the offer. It seemed to be a fairy tale how this is all came together over one weekend. I am truly blessed!

I am beginning to think that I may now be a 'collector.' Such a nice game to be adding to Pecos' Palatial Pinball Parlour! But I prefer to think of myself as a restorer rather than a collector!

And then something really extraordinary happened. RyanClaytor and ZNET colluded to purchase the backglass for me. They collected money from some of the Project Pin regulars to pay for the backglass!

I want to include your names here:

AlexF
Ballypin
BingoPodcast
Captive_Ball
Cheddar
Colsond3
Crispin
cyroute
fingersport
ForceFlow
Gdonovan
Matesamo
NicoVolta
@Rkhar
too-many-pins
SergioJ
SkyKing2301
Songofsixpence
ZNET
nascarrey

Thank you! This thread is for you!

This backglass is incredibly nice for an original backglass that is 65 years old!

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The first job was to get the ole Queen up on her feet. I had to move two other pins to make room for her.

I began by cleaning the leg bolts. They were neatly wrapped in tape but there were only six of them! And these are no ordinary leg bolts. They are extra long to allow for the width of the wooden legs. The bolts cleaned up nicely, but those washers are a complete loss - really hacked up.

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The sides of the bolts will get the wire brush treatment, but not now. I am too anxious to get this game up and on its feet.

Next I worked on the bottom of the legs. This is my first time ever working with wood legs and I was curious how the 'feet' were attached to the legs. I was surprised to see regular 2" leg levelers used as the feet. I don't know if this is standard fare, but it sure makes my job getting the Queen of Hearts up on her feet again. I used a wire brush to clean the leg leveler receivers. Four legs and each one was different!

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One leg had a tee nut. Another had a rectangular nut. The other two had round nuts - one screwed on with screws and the other attached with nails! This was sort of freaking me out. I haven't even gotten to the mechs yet and I'm finding all sorts of hacks! I didn't have a tee nut, so the old one would have to do, for now, but it was a foreboding start.

The legs went on pretty easily. One of the bolt plates had to be hammered back into place, but up on her legs she was!

This glass had to come off and, as I mentioned, it was broken. I have the pieces, I may try to put the puzzle pieces back together again and apply a piece of Mylar on each side of the glass.

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The lockdown bar was somewhat of a mystery. No lever to push to unlock it! It is attached with two long bolts. There were no nuts on these bolts, so I just carefully pulled the lockdown bar up and off.

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Well, here she is, part of her at least, in all her regal glory!

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A place of honor!!

#2 2 years ago

Lookin' forward to the ride!

Real excited,
Ryan

#3 2 years ago
Quoted from Pecos:

This glass had to come off and, as I mentioned, it was broken. I have the pieces, I may try to put the puzzle pieces back together again and apply a piece of Mylar on each side of the glass.

Since the glass is broken. Just spend your money for a proper tempered glass replacement, 'think safety first'.

#4 2 years ago

Most examples exhibit considerable wear at the pop bumpers, poker grid inserts and gobble holes. Your playfield looks exceptionally well preserved. Also, your game has a nice original coin door. It's going to be a gem when you're done.

#5 2 years ago
Quoted from Pecos:

The lockdown bar was somewhat of a mystery. No lever to push to unlock it! It is attached with two long bolts. There were no nuts on these bolts, so I just carefully pulled the lockdown bar up and off.

Ha-ha! That arrangement really tripped me out the first time I experienced it, too! Typically just a couple of wingnuts go on the other side, though. I'm sure you could tote that wooden lockdown bar with you to a big box hardware store and find what you need.

Quoted from Pecos:

This glass had to come off and, as I mentioned, it was broken. I have the pieces, I may try to put the puzzle pieces back together again and apply a piece of Mylar on each side of the glass.

Quoted from Darcy:

Since the glass is broken. Just spend your money for a proper tempered glass replacement, 'think safety first'.

Amen. I couldn't tell if Pecos was joking about this or not, but just in case he WASN'T...I'd wholeheartedly agree with Darcy.

New tempered glass:
- inexpensive
- safe
- PRETTY!!!

...because as ZNET mentioned...

Quoted from ZNET:

Most examples exhibit considerable wear at the pop bumpers, poker grid inserts and gobble holes. Your playfield looks exceptionally well preserved. Also, your game has a nice original coin door. It's going to be a gem when you're done.

...and you're gonna want to showcase your gem (not hide it behind broken shards and mylar).

Still excited,
Ryan

#6 2 years ago
Quoted from Pecos:

It's the beginning of a new year, the perfect time to start a new project! Never mind the fact that I have three other Project Pins in various stages of restoration and dissasembly.

Haha. This is TOTALLY normal and sounds like you are talking about me. Great thread. Following along !

#7 2 years ago

That is going to be a showpiece! Beautiful playfield and amazing backglass, you have what looks like a true family heirloom.

#8 2 years ago

Congrats Pecos, along for the ride! This reminds me that I still need to order a schematic for this game.

#9 2 years ago

Oh yea! Really looking forward to watching progress!!

#10 2 years ago
Quoted from Pecos:

The playfield glass had been broken by his neighbor earlier in the day.

What's the story there? I'm guessing his neighbor helped him move it to the garage and accidentally kicked it or something? This thread already has epic written all over it.

#11 2 years ago

Very nice QoH! And I like that bright, unfaded Airborne Avenger backglass

Jody

#12 2 years ago

Nice pick up pecos! I look forward to following this thread.

#13 2 years ago

Agree - not worth keeping 50's glass even if it is original as it is lethal.

PBR has wingnuts for lockdown bar.

Nice game

#14 2 years ago
Quoted from RyanClaytor:

Typically just a couple of wingnuts go on the other side, though. I'm sure you could tote that wooden lockdown bar with you to a big box hardware store and find what you need.

I have my own personal hardware guy, Kris, at Ace Hardware who goes above and beyond the call of duty to provide the parts I need. We always talk pinball. I got the wingnuts today, plus a restock of my hardware stash.

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I may do the Mylar trick for a temporary solution - as long as the game remains here at Pecos' Palatial Pinball Parlour. Mylar on both sides of the glass should be safe enough in my gameroom and the Mylar will not hide the playfield. The glass on this game is thicker and is going to cost quite a bit to replace.

Quoted from Darcy:

Since the glass is broken. Just spend your money for a proper tempered glass replacement, 'think safety first'.

Quoted from RyanClaytor:

Amen. I couldn't tell if Pecos was joking about this or not, but just in case he WASN'T...I'd wholeheartedly agree with Darcy.

New tempered glass:
- inexpensive
- safe
- PRETTY!!!

Quoted from Shapeshifter:

Agree - not worth keeping 50's glass even if it is original as it is lethal.

Okay guys! I know when it's time to shake my head and agree with you.

Quoted from ZNET:

Any standard sized top glass will work on a Gottlieb woodrail, including Queen of Hearts.

I have a spare playfield glass that I got from TimeTraveler so that will be the best solution, for now.

Quoted from bkbirge:

What's the story there? I'm guessing his neighbor helped him move it to the garage and accidentally kicked it or something?

The backbox frame was halfway off and the backglass had fallen down onto the playfield glass, breaking it. That is WHAT happened, WHY it happened is still a mystery.

Quoted from bkbirge:

This thread already has epic written all over it.

That's a high bar to achieve. I hope this thread will exceed your expectations!

Quoted from tandem2:

I like that bright, unfaded Airborne Avenger backglass

Jody

Hi Jody. Unfortunately, the camera shows the colors much brighter than they are in reality. It does have significant fading.

Quoted from ZNET:

Most examples exhibit considerable wear at the pop bumpers, poker grid inserts and gobble holes. Your playfield looks exceptionally well preserved.

There are some loose and curled up pieces of something, Mylar?, around the pop bumpers. The caps look great! All pics are before playfield cleaning.

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Some more close-ups.

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Quoted from Matesamo:

That is going to be a showpiece! Beautiful playfield and amazing backglass, you have what looks like a true family heirloom.

Quoted from ZNET:

It's going to be a gem when you're done.

Thanks guys. It's a keeper and I do appreciate how nice it looks now, even before any cleaning. I will be using the safest of safe chemicals to clean the playfield, Naphtha.

Thank you all for the kind words and well-wishes!

#15 2 years ago

Wow, you didn't waste time to start jumping on that one!! Playfield does look nice. Some Magic Eraser and Novus 1 used lightly should take care of those swirls. Looking forward to following.

#16 2 years ago

Your game has vinyl aftermarket protectors around the pop bumpers. It was common for operators to add them to games on location. If you're lucky, they were installed before much wear occurred. Typically, they were a hideous faux woodgrain in design which were applied with self-stick adhesive.

I have had success removing them with 3M adhesive remover spray and blow-dryer heat. Your game appears to have loose protectors, which should separate easily from the playfield. Hopefully, the paint beneath them will have been well preserved.

#17 2 years ago
Quoted from Pecos:

I have my own personal hardware guy, Kris, at Ace Hardware

Is that your dude? I thought that was an actual Ace ad. That guy looks like he knows what he's talking about.

Quoted from Pecos:

Okay guys! I know when it's time to shake my head and agree with you.

*Phew!* Thank goodness.

Quoted from Pecos:

All pics are before playfield cleaning.

Jeez...even before cleaning it is astonishing how good it looks.

Can't wait to see it after...

Quoted from Pecos:

...using the safest of safe chemicals to clean the playfield

I've seen your restorations in the past and I know you're gonna treat this with reverence and respect. Already looking forward to the final product but excited for the journey.

Go Pecos!

#18 2 years ago

Agree - slowly take off the pop bumper mylar - they always look horrible.

Personally I wouldn't use magic eraser on a 50's p/f as the paint will come off as well.

Be very very careful cleaning and remember the enemy of good is better!

Going back to glass - normal tempered is totally fine. I had a sheet of original 50's glass in a game and was going to keep it but I realized if one of our cats jumped on the game and it broke, well, you know the rest.

Pop caps are lovely originals so have the marbalized appearance - impossible to replicate.

And most Queen of Hearts don't have the original coin door.

It was one of Wayne Neyens favorite games. It's a classic.

Oh, this is a personal thing but I would advise resisting playfield touch up's - it's only original once and nothing worse than bad touch up's which are anything the eye can notice!

#19 2 years ago

Looking forward to seeing more progress Pecos

#20 2 years ago
Quoted from Shapeshifter:

Agree - slowly take off the pop bumper mylar - they always look horrible.
Personally I wouldn't use magic eraser on a 50's p/f as the paint will come off as well.
Be very very careful cleaning and remember the enemy of good is better!
Going back to glass - normal tempered is totally fine. I had a sheet of original 50's glass in a game and was going to keep it but I realized if one of our cats jumped on the game and it broke, well, you know the rest.
Pop caps are lovely originals so have the marbalized appearance - impossible to replicate.
And most Queen of Hearts don't have the original coin door.
It was one of Wayne Neyens favorite games. It's a classic.
Oh, this is a personal thing but I would advise resisting playfield touch up's - it's only original once and nothing worse than bad touch up's which are anything the eye can notice!

I agree with all of Shapeshifter's advice, including the suggestion to refrain from touching up that playfield.

Also, get a repro tray liner from PBR and I will try to locate an email compatible version of the score card to send to you.

Neyens has noted that of all of his designs, Queen of Hearts is his #1 favorite.

#21 2 years ago
Quoted from ZNET:

Neyens has noted that of all of his designs, Queen of Hearts is his #1 favorite.

He is especially proud of the circuit involved with the ball return from the gobble holes.

#22 2 years ago
Quoted from ZNET:

Your game has vinyl aftermarket protectors around the pop bumpers. It was common for operators to add them to games on location. If you're lucky, they were installed before much wear occurred. Typically, they were a hideous faux woodgrain in design which were applied with self-stick adhesive.

Quoted from Shapeshifter:

Agree - slowly take off the pop bumper mylar - they always look horrible.

Now that you mention it, ZNET, I recognize those Wico vinyl pop bumper playfield protectors. I'm used to seeing the walnut colored ones. My Expo had them.

Quoted from RyanClaytor:

I've seen your restorations in the past and I know you're gonna treat this with reverence and respect. Already looking forward to the final product but excited for the journey.

This isn't my first restoration of a collectible pin. So, yes, I will be giving the Queen special treatment because it is rare and collectible.

https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/bally-1970-double-up-minimalist-restoration

I started on the playfield shop-out today:

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The pop bumper playfield protectors were already off of the playfield except for in a few sections. They came off easily with no further damage to the playfield.

Are these pop bumper skirts original or the correct substitutes? The red skirts don't look right for this old game!

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Got my first look at the guts of this game. Did you know that you have to remove six screws to lift the playfield up? I didn't! Surprise, Surprise! I WAS pleasantly surprised to see no obvious hacks 'under the hood.'

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Under the playfield:

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#23 2 years ago
Quoted from Pecos:

Did you know that you have to remove six screws to lift the playfield up? I didn't!

Haha! You sound exactly like I did last year after nabbing Score-Board. Love it. ...and I love that you're not only diving into this, but documenting it!

#24 2 years ago

Preliminarily, to answer your question, the red passive bumper skirts on your game are correct. Below are photos of my game, for reference.

At one point, I swapped my game's original bumper caps for repro caps to match the new white pop bumper skirts (as depicted in photo #5). Later, I returned the yellowed originals to the game, which I prefer. My plan is to dye the repro white skirts with Rit tan fabric dye (soaking the skirts in the dye) so that they mimic a vintage appearance and match the original caps and the original flippers. (See photos #1 - #4).

I shall email to you the two score cards below. Check out the promotional ad for the game (below).

Queen of Hearts has one of my favorite features. . .rollunder gates. In my opinion, rollunders are (dare I say) "under" appreciated.

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#25 2 years ago

Your playfield is going to look great - really nice example.

Notice you have the right coin mech - they are fairly easy to get working and it should be nickels.

And you have a play meter. Probably won't be working but I got all mine functioning perfectly by taking them part and cleaning rust off the spindles. Bit tricky to get back together again but I like to have everything working on a game so it is the same as it would have been back in the day.

#26 2 years ago

Coming along great Pecos...that is a nice example now that we're seeing some close ups! Glad that you were able to pop those mylar rings off without incident.

#27 2 years ago

I had to switch from Naphtha to 91% Isopropyl alcohol. There were some white 'somethings' on the playfield and Naphtha just wasn't cutting it.

WARNING! Test 91% Isopropyl alcohol in an inconspicuous spot before ever attempting to use it to clean a playfield. I used 91% Isopropyl alcohol on a Gottlieb King Pin and it turned the clear coat to rubber, which is exactly what I wanted. Be very careful when attempting to use Isopropyl alcohol and always use 91% or better Isopropyl alchohol, if you must.

I am very happy with the results. All of the bad stuff came off and all of the good stuff remains. The playfield is as good as it is going to get. It is as good as it CAN get!

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I noticed after looking at the pictures that znet posted that I was missing the artwork on the lower apron. He told me that is called a tray liner and are available at The Pinball Resource. I will be ordering a green one to bring the apron back to looking like it was and how it should be.

I did notice a problem when trying to replace the brown rebound rubber. Look Ma! No bolt!

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#28 2 years ago
Quoted from Pecos:

I had to switch from Naphtha to 91% Isopropyl alcohol. There were some white 'somethings' on the playfield and Naphtha just wasn't cutting it.
WARNING! Test 91% Isopropyl alcohol in an inconspicuous spot before ever attempting to use it to clean a playfield. I used 91% Isopropyl alcohol on a Gottlieb King Pin and it turned the clear coat to rubber, which is exactly what I wanted. Be very careful when attempting to use Isopropyl alcohol and always use 91% or better Isopropyl alchohol, if you must.
I am very happy with the results. All of the bad stuff came off and all of the good stuff remains. The playfield is as good as it is going to get. It is as good as it CAN get!

I noticed after looking at the pictures that znet posted that I was missing the artwork on the lower apron. He told me that is called a tray liner and are available at The Pinball Resource. I will be ordering a green one to bring the apron back to looking like it was and how it should be.
I did notice a problem when trying to replace the brown rebound rubber. Look Ma! No bolt!

Looking good. Those rebound rubbers are removed by gripping firmly on one end and twisting outward and over the stalk head to release from its center stalk. Gottlieb utilized this boltless style hardware on most of its games.

#29 2 years ago

When you order that tray liner from PBR, don't forget to order the correct flippers (white with raised blue lettering).

Edit: I meant "recessed" but typed "raised." The blue ink can be added to original flippers fairly easily, with a magnifier, if you find unwarped originals in need of a facelift.

#30 2 years ago

Lettering is not raised it is incused on the flippers. Raised was used on mostly Bally flippers.

#31 2 years ago

Excellent work, Pecos!

#32 2 years ago
Quoted from pintoys:

Lettering is not raised it is incused on the flippers. Raised was used on mostly Bally flippers.

The correct flipper style is indeed recessed, as shown on my QoH example depicted. Disregard my erroneous reference to raised lettering.

Steve Young would never permit Pecos to order the wrong style. Always call in your order to PBR.

#33 2 years ago

PBR also has a repro shooter gauge available to reach that cracked one on your pin.
Such a sweet looking game, the artwork is the best!

#34 2 years ago
Quoted from dasvis:

PBR also has a repro shooter gauge available to reach that cracked one on your pin.
Such a sweet looking game, the artwork is the best!

Agreed. Those things are a little pricey, but definitely worth it when you're going this far on a game, and because it's something that you're staring at so often while playing.

#35 2 years ago

This is gonna be an awesome restore!!

#36 2 years ago
Quoted from dasvis:

PBR also has a repro shooter gauge available to reach that cracked one on your pin.
Such a sweet looking game, the artwork is the best!

But the repro's aren't marbled and just don't look as nice.

Cracked, marbled original gets my vote!

#37 2 years ago
Quoted from Shapeshifter:

But the repro's aren't marbled and just don't look as nice.
Cracked, marbled original gets my vote!

That shooter gauge appears to have the common fractures at the screw points. I would glue a piece of plastic to repair the top hole area and place a red bulb sleeve over it to camouflage the repair. This sleeve repair may sound hokey; but, it blends in pretty well. At least, this method has worked for me in the past.

The original marbelized ones do look better and the repros cost about $50.

#38 2 years ago
Quoted from Shapeshifter:

Your playfield is going to look great - really nice example.

Thanks Shapeshifter!

Quoted from Shapeshifter:

Notice you have the right coin mech - they are fairly easy to get working and it should be nickels.

Cool!

Quoted from Shapeshifter:

And you have a play meter. Probably won't be working but I got all mine functioning perfectly by taking them part and cleaning rust off the spindles. Bit tricky to get back together again but I like to have everything working on a game so it is the same as it would have been back in the day.

I like to have my games restored as close to factory as possible, including a working coin mech. When done, I should be able to put them in a working pinball museaum. Hope I don't have to take that play meter apart!

Quoted from ZNET:

Those rebound rubbers are removed by gripping firmly on one end and twisting outward and over the stalk head to release from its center stalk. Gottlieb utilized this boltless style hardware on most of its games.

Thanks ZNET for that! I was considering doing something silly, but you saved me from myself! Almost -->

Quoted from ZNET:

When you order that tray liner from PBR, don't forget to order the correct flippers (white with raised blue lettering).

Edit: I meant "recessed" but typed "raised." The blue ink can be added to original flippers fairly easily, with a magnifier, if you find unwarped originals in need of a facelift.

Quoted from pintoys:

Lettering is not raised it is incused on the flippers. Raised was used on mostly Bally flippers.

Thanks guys. I never would have noticed. I will say it here for the first of probably many times, I am a Williams guy and not a Gottlieb guy so not familiar with the way Gottlieb built their games. But I really am liking how Gottlieb manufactured their games back in the early 50s.

The shoe on the right flipper is bent at the end causing the 'flipper angel.' I can't imagine how it could have gotten bent during normal wear and tear. It had to be put on that way?? I will be touching that area up. I would loathe having to look at it every time I play. However, it will be reversible if someone wants to see ugly! I will be using only acrylic paint and Carnauba wax.

Quoted from lyonsden:

Excellent work, Pecos!

Thanks lyonsden! It's nice to have a fellow Tucsonan on board. You are welcome to come over and have a gander if you so wish.

Quoted from ZNET:

Steve Young would never permit Pecos to order the wrong style.

I email my orders. I picked the wrong post nuts for a Gottlieb/Premier Monte Carlo and Jimmy/Steve caught it. So, yeah, those guys are good at correcting mistakes before shipping.

Quoted from dasvis:

PBR also has a repro shooter gauge available to reach that cracked one on your pin.

Good to know! Thanks dasvis! You get Double Bonus points for spotting that and Triple Bonus points for recommending a replacement!

Quoted from Shapeshifter:

But the repro's aren't marbled and just don't look as nice.

Cracked, marbled original gets my vote!

Decisions, Decisions! When in doubt, go with the original is my motto.

Quoted from ZNET:

That shooter gauge appears to have the common fractures at the screw points. I would glue a piece of plastic to repair the top hole area and place a red bulb sleeve over it to camouflage the repair. This sleeve repair may sound hokey; but, it blends in pretty well. At least, this method has worked for me in the past.

The original marbelized ones do look better and the repros cost about $50.

Great suggestion ZNET. I will try to save it, but it will have to go at the bottom of a very long queue.

Thanks to all of you offering me your advice for getting me pointed in the right direction. You guys and gals are the best!

#39 2 years ago

In this photo, you can see the repair to the shooter gauge's upper screw area on Grand Slam.

I glued a plastic or metal washer, reshaped to correct size with a dremel, to recreate the missing piece and then covered it with a red bulb sleeve. This original gauge had great marbleizing. It would have been a shame to have discarded it.

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#40 2 years ago

The playfield has been put back together. Each screw head was polished the old fashioned way, by hand. I learned about Mother's Mag and Aluminum Polish here on Pinside. It's great stuff! I bought the round cotton pad Swisspers at Walmart. I like them better than the square pads. They don't fall apart as easily.

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The lamps sit on these nice concave metal pieces - much better than those lousy springs they used in the 70s. They just don't make 'em like they used to!

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The upper plastics were filthy, filthy enough to attempt to clean them. There was some sort of sticky substance on the bottom side. I tried blue glass cleaner and water first, but it wasn't cleaning the gunk off. I tested 91% alcohol in a corner. It worked really well, too well. It removed everything including the ink. I didn't try Naphtha, but after the alcohol test I decided to leave them alone. Dirty is better than destroyed!

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I discovered that those five pinball gobble holes are also black holes for errant parts. Parts check in but they never check out! If you look closely, you will see one missing screw in the pics below.

And now, to show off the clean and shiny playfield:

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#41 2 years ago

<
Those tiny pop cap screws are easy to lose! PBR has a stainless version that looks close to original if you need them.
blockquote cite="#4165417">The playfield has been put back together. Each screw head was polished the old fashioned way, by hand. I learned about Mother's Mag and Aluminum Polish here on Pinside. It's great stuff! I bought the round cotton pad Swisspers at Walmart. I like them better than the square pads. They don't fall apart as easily.

The lamps sit on these nice concave metal pieces - much better than those lousy springs they used in the 70s. They just don't make 'em like they used to!

The upper plastics were filthy, filthy enough to attempt to clean them. There was some sort of sticky substance on the bottom side. I tried blue glass cleaner and water first, but it wasn't cleaning the gunk off. I tested 91% alcohol in a corner. It worked really well, too well. It removed everything including the ink. I didn't try Naphtha, but after the alcohol test I decided to leave them alone. Dirty is better than destroyed!

I discovered that those five pinball gobble holes are also black holes for errant parts. Parts check in but they never check out! If you look closely, you will see one missing screw in the pics below.
And now, to show off the clean and shiny playfield:

#42 2 years ago
Quoted from Pecos:

tried blue glass cleaner and water first, but it wasn't cleaning the gunk off. I tested 91% alcohol in a corner. It worked really well, too well. It removed everything including the ink. I didn't try Naphtha, but after the alcohol test I decided to leave them alone. Dirty is better than destroyed!

Novus 1 or CP-100 should work to at least remove the black caked on dust / dirt.

#43 2 years ago

50's plastics are unlike anything else.

Try and flatten and they will break.

And the stickiness does not come off - some sort of chemical reaction to the plastics being heated over the years.

If lucky enough to have original plastics, I just leave them be and buy a repro set as a back up.

http://shayarcadegroup.com

#44 2 years ago

Now, on to the pops, slings and flippers. All mechs will be taken apart, cleaned, polished and new parts added as needed and then rebuilt. I started with the pop bumpers. Hmm, these looked familiar. The only part missing from these 1952 pop bumpers and the pop bumpers I am used to from the 70s is the fiber yoke is missing in the earlier pop bumpers.

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The skirts on these pop bumpers look like a herd of beavers had chewed the edges. I didn't want to replace these with brand new lily white skirts. Ironically, the Williams Super-Flite I am currently working on had skirts that were in good shape and in a more subdued translucent white. I had already replaced them on Super-Flite with yellow skirts so they just sitting there waiting for more pop pop pop bumper duty. I obliged.

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I am always looking for ways to improve my restoration procedures. I have recently adopted Nic's nicovolta's method of polishing the plungers, and rod and ring assemblies with Mother's Mag and Aluminum Polish. It works really well and will continue to use this method. It was particularly helpful in this case. The pop bumper rings were rough, more like sandpaper that a nice smooth ring. These would have wreaked havoc on new pinballs! I spent 15 minutes on each one to polish it to a nice shine.

I like how these look!

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#45 2 years ago
Quoted from Pecos:

Now, on to the pops, slings and flippers. All mechs will be taken apart, cleaned, polished and new parts added as needed and then rebuilt. I started with the pop bumpers. Hmm, these looked familiar. The only part missing from these 1952 pop bumpers and the pop bumpers I am used to from the 70s is the fiber yoke is missing in the earlier pop bumpers.

The skirts on these pop bumpers look like a herd of beavers had chewed the edges. I didn't want to replace these with brand new lily white skirts. Ironically, the Williams Super-Flite I am currently working on had skirts that were in good shape and in a more subdued translucent white. I had already replaced them on Super-Flite with yellow skirts so they just sitting there waiting for more pop pop pop bumper duty. I obliged.

I am always looking for ways to improve my restoration procedures. I have recently adopted Nic's nicovolta's method of polishing the plungers, and rod and ring assemblies with Mother's Mag and Aluminum Polish. It works really well and will continue to use this method. It was particularly helpful in this case. The pop bumper rings were rough, more like sandpaper that a nice smooth ring. These would have wreaked havoc on new pinballs! I spent 15 minutes on each one to polish it to a nice shine.
I like how these look!

Good job with the pop bumpers skirts. As mentioned earlier, I plan to dye my lily white repro skirts with Rit tan dye to artificially dye them.

#46 2 years ago
Quoted from Colsond3:

Novus 1 or CP-100 should work to at least remove the black caked on dust / dirt.

Isn't Novus 1 abrasive? I don't have any Novus products in the kit, but will consider adding them if the right task comes along.

Quoted from Shapeshifter:

If lucky enough to have original plastics, I just leave them be and buy a repro set as a back up.

Leaving them alone is the best option at this point. It's just too risky to try to clean these fragile plastics. Thanks for the link.

#47 2 years ago
Quoted from Pecos:

Isn't Novus 1 abrasive? I don't have any Novus products in the kit, but will consider adding them if the right task comes along.

Leaving them alone is the best option at this point. It's just too risky to try to clean these fragile plastics. Thanks for the link.

Yeah Novus 1 is pretty abrasive. I would use Novus 2 on plastics, followed by a polish up with Plexus... amazon.com link »

#48 2 years ago
Quoted from dasvis:

Yeah Novus 1 is pretty abrasive. I would use Novus 2 on plastics, followed by a polish up with Plexus... amazon.com link »

I think that the abrasive quotient increases numerically, Novus 1 being nonabrasive and Novus 3 containing the highest grit. Novus 2 is sometimes utilized to remove tough grime/debris on various woodrail components.

#49 2 years ago
Quoted from ZNET:

I think that the abrasive quotient increases numerically, Novus 1 being nonabrasive and Novus 3 containing the highest grit. Novus 2 is sometimes utilized to remove tough grime/debris on various woodrail components.

Oops, yeah, you are correct!

#50 2 years ago
Quoted from ZNET:

Novus 2 is sometimes utilized to remove tough grime/debris on various woodrail components.

I might try that on the woodrails above the flipper buttons and on the legs. I need to buy a Novus 2 bottle for experimentation if nothing else.

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