(Topic ID: 91598)

p-roc advice?


By swf127

5 years ago



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  • 18 posts
  • 8 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 5 years ago by Snux
  • Topic is favorited by 2 Pinsiders

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#1 5 years ago

Hi,

So I've been looking for a side project and ended up picking up a South Park. It strikes me as an ok playfield design with kind of boring rules/modes. I'm debating re-writing it using a p-roc and the python pyprocgame library. The idea of adding several modes and associated call outs by harvesting clips of the show sounds amusing. I'm just wondering what I should use to drive it, be it a Raspberry PI, BeagleBone, or whatever. I've no plans on selling this, so the hardware cost itself isn't really that much of a driver. I just don't want to be limited in terms of the amount of media I can serve up. An RJ45 port so I can ssh into it is a plus, but not required. Any recommendations?

Thanks,
S.

#2 5 years ago

Can the PROC be driven by a RazPi? Thought it was PC only...
I'd personally want to drive it from a ATOM x86 board at a minimum; just so I could has the PROC community for help when I got into sticky situations.

I assume you mean a Data East SP... not a Stern SP.

#3 5 years ago
Quoted from Zitt:

Can the PROC be driven by a RazPi? Thought it was PC only...

Anything with a USB port, and enough speed to run whatever code you feed it.

#4 5 years ago
Quoted from Zitt:

Can the PROC be driven by a RazPi? Thought it was PC only...

I saw some info out there with people driving it with razPi, but it was comments in source code so mileage may vary.

Quoted from Zitt:

I'd personally want to drive it from a ATOM x86 board at a minimum; just so I could has the PROC community for help when I got into sticky situations.

That's what I'm trying to get a handle on. My use case isn't typical because I don't really care what it costs within reason. If you're making a few thousand of them, saving fifty bucks matters but I'm only making one. I don't think I need a ton of resources although the prospect of having all media pre-cached in memory sounds attractive.

Quoted from Zitt:

I assume you mean a Data East SP... not a Stern SP.

What I bought was a Sega/Stern SP. I wasn't aware DE even had a South Park.

#5 5 years ago

I haven't done Proc dev yet... so I'm not educated exactly in what's done.
TBH; your question might be better served on the PROC forums:
http://www.pinballcontrollers.com/forum/index.php?PHPSESSID=rt3ve01udqkik06rcd6clohbp7&board=8.0

I know many of the devs hang out here... but unsure how many make the time to post in both places.

My "gut" tells me you need speeds for any calculations... and graphics you might display via vga/hdmi.

#6 5 years ago
Quoted from Zitt:

TBH; your question might be better served on the PROC forums:

Thanks for the pointer to their forums. I take a shot and see what they say.

Quoted from Zitt:

My "gut" tells me you need speeds for any calculations... and graphics you might display via vga/hdmi.

I'm not that ambitious, honestly. I know people love the flash factor on the WOZ but I hardly ever look at the display when I'm playing it. Displaying images like the humancentipad scene while playing sound is as far as I'd bother going. I think that's doable.. maybe with a cheapie display.

Cuttlefish!? OK!

cuttlefish.jpg

Post edited by swf127: I mis-read the post I was responding to so had to adjust my reply.

#7 5 years ago

A Raspberry Pi will be fine for your custom game, but probably not fast enough to run the PinMAME emulation if you care about having the original rules available.

#8 5 years ago

A Pi won't work if you want to go with the full color LCD DMD, and given how much cheaper an option that is if your Plasma DMD ever fails, you should step up to a "real" PC. You'd do very well with a Shuttle DS61 book PC and a G540 celeron cpu. You're in Boston so I don't need to tell you how cheap those CPUs are at microcenter.

South Park is a fun layout. I used to play one in an arcade a ton back in "the day" rotating between that, TZ, and TAF (and SSF2T, if I'm being totally honest).

And, yes, join us at the pinballcontrollers.com forums. We have cake..?

#9 5 years ago

Last time I checked, the P-Roc only works on WPC, WPC-95, Stern Whitestar, Stern SAM and System 11 (if you build the custom daughterboard). I don't think it will interface with the DataEast/Sega driver board. Gerry can confirm if you PM him.

As far as what you should drive it with, I think a cheap PC is ideal. It doesn't have to be very fast. I just setup a dropbox account on mine so I can automatically sync data between the computer I am developing on and the computer in the machine.

Yes there are ways of making a Raspberry Pi work, but I think the quick iteration on a PC would be ideal.

#10 5 years ago
Quoted from swedishc:

Last time I checked, the P-Roc only works on WPC, WPC-95, Stern Whitestar, Stern SAM and System 11 (if you build the custom daughterboard). I don't think it will interface with the DataEast/Sega driver board. Gerry can confirm if you PM him.

Southpark is a stern whitestar; all the Sega pins of the mid-late 90s were I believe.

Also, if you want to drive DE/System 11, MarkS has a board that he sells as a kit or pre-built, based on Stephen's design. We've come a long way

#11 5 years ago
Quoted from Mocean:

Southpark is a stern whitestar

Ahh, good to know! Also, MarkS is a wealth of knowledge.

#12 5 years ago
Quoted from Mocean:

You'd do very well with a Shuttle DS61 book PC and a G540 celeron cpu. You're in Boston so I don't need to tell you how cheap those CPUs are at microcenter.

Yea, I'd considered going that route. I'll check out the box you're recommending. I've been looking at the Beaglebone Black Rev C and that looks promising as well.

Quoted from Mocean:

And, yes, join us at the pinballcontrollers.com forums. We have cake..?

Just signed up a few hours ago. Starting to dig through what's there as I write this. Lots to learn and code to read.

Quoted from Mocean:

Also, if you want to drive DE/System 11, MarkS has a board that he sells as a kit or pre-built, based on Stephen's design. We've come a long way

Really opens up the field and it's cool to know that's available. Thanks!

Quoted from ecurtz:

but probably not fast enough to run the PinMAME emulation if you care about having the original rules available.

I've never dug into PinMAME but having the ability to switch between my version and the real deal would be ideal. I'll have to check it out.. Thanks!

#13 5 years ago
Quoted from Mocean:

A Pi won't work if you want to go with the full color LCD DMD, and given how much cheaper an option that is if your Plasma DMD ever fails, you should step up to a "real" PC. You'd do very well with a Shuttle DS61 book PC and a G540 celeron cpu. You're in Boston so I don't need to tell you how cheap those CPUs are at microcenter.

Just read your post about your Buffy project and saw the output. Those Buffy clips look really excellent. Did you guys end up going with or without dots? I thought it looked really good with myself but really pops either way.. Awesome work guys!

#14 5 years ago

My gut with non-x86 devices is that you run a risk of incompatibility / software stack issues getting set up. With X86; "in theory" you just apt-get or yum or whatever to install the python compiler and what-nots.

IF someone actually IS running RazPi ... with the stack; I'm sure they had some "fun" getting it all right.

#15 5 years ago
Quoted from Zitt:

My gut with non-x86 devices is that you run a risk of incompatibility / software stack issues getting set up. With X86; "in theory" you just apt-get or yum or whatever to install the python compiler and what-nots.
IF someone actually IS running RazPi ... with the stack; I'm sure they had some "fun" getting it all right.

Everybody should ignore Zitt's gut in this case.

Lots of people, including me, are running non-x86 for various P-ROC projects. All of the apt-get library installs work fine on every non-x86 board I've tried: R-Pi, Beaglebone, Beaglebone black, etc. I haven't tried the most recent proc-tools install script for linux on a non-x86, but I bet it works fine too and provides a single command to install the entire toolchain. The folks who did the work creating Ubuntu images for these non-x86 boards are to be thanked. They did the hard work. We reap the benefits. In my experiences, getting P-ROC to work on a non-x86 is exactly the same as on x86.

The only caveat to that is pinMAME. I don't think anybody's running pinMAME on a non-x86 due to the need to address an ASM issue. The non-x86 boards most are using are probably too weak to run pinMAME anyway; so it might be a moot point.

- Gerry
http://www.multimorphic.com
http://www.pinballcontrollers.com

#16 5 years ago
Quoted from Zitt:

My gut with non-x86 devices is that you run a risk of incompatibility / software stack issues getting set up. With X86; "in theory" you just apt-get or yum or whatever to install the python compiler and what-nots.
IF someone actually IS running RazPi ... with the stack; I'm sure they had some "fun" getting it all right.

True that non x86 can't run pinmame so running stock /williams/ roms via emulation is out. Now, since this is a Stern Whitestar, I have no idea what the emulation status of that is. My guess is non existent.

The pinproc/ pyprocgame environment works on the pi and isn't bad to set up at all. It is an option.

The beagle bone black is crazy sold out everywhere, so... That's a factor, too.

Quoted from swf127:

Just read your post about your Buffy project and saw the output. Those Buffy clips look really excellent. Did you guys end up going with or without dots? I thought it looked really good with myself but really pops either way.. Awesome work guys!

Thanks. We opted for no dots. There's a lot of videos but we haven't shared any software videos recently. I miss the
Dots a little...

If you want to see the same color/HD hacked framework, with dots enabled, check out Rosh's the Kugler Family Pin. Rosh is the only other person I know of using the HD/ color hacks and he's contributed a metric ton of code to that effort too. Plus his game looks really sharp.

#17 5 years ago
Quoted from gstellenberg:

Everybody should ignore Zitt's gut in this case.

Fair enough.
I'd rightfully admit; I'm a biased bigoted bastard when it comes to other Architectures.

#18 5 years ago
Quoted from Mocean:

Also, if you want to drive DE/System 11, MarkS has a board that he sells as a kit or pre-built, based on Stephen's design. We've come a long way

MarkS, that's me. Why I have a different name on the pinballcontrollers forum compared to here I'm not sure. Makes life more interesting I suppose. The board we have works well for System 11 in the machines it's been tried in so far. For Data East (and possibly Sega), it *should* work since they stole the Sys11 design but it has only ever been tested in a Star Wars. We found that one connector needed repinning due to an error in the DE manual but apart from that it worked. No other DE or Sega machines have been tried to my knowledge, although I couldn't say for sure as not everyone on the P-ROC bandwagon goes public with whatever they're developing.

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