(Topic ID: 338107)

Overview of high voltage areas

By ravve

1 year ago



Topic Stats

  • 8 posts
  • 6 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 1 year ago by PinRetail
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    #1 1 year ago

    Curious if somebody has an overview of "where not to touch" while game is on, i.e. where are the high voltage areas located on a typicall machine (wpc era)?
    I know it depends on the title, but perhaps someone has pics showing the areas in general?
    Inside backbox, under pf, and inside cabinet...

    Many PCBs have a high voltage part, as well as coils, some connectors and so on. I am looking for a "lazy guide" showing all this, instead of looking at the schematics
    Doesn´t have to be marked exactly, just area-wize would be enough.

    Perhaps a weird question but hey, it´s Friday

    #2 1 year ago

    For all machines, anything around the transformer, on/off switches, and service outlets. For specific machines, you will have to look. For example, on Gottliebs, any big red coil for resetting switch banks is usually line voltage. For early Bally/Stern machines, the display voltage area on the SDB can bite pretty hard (Don't ask how I know!), and the pins on the displays carry high voltage.

    Basically, if you're not sure, look at the schematic, or use your multimeter BEFORE touching, not after.

    #3 1 year ago

    Don't touch any fuses, fuse holders, coils, or the metal tabs on drive transistors.

    #4 1 year ago
    Quoted from Billc479:

    For early Bally/Stern machines, the display voltage area on the SDB can bite pretty hard (Don't ask how I know!)

    Ill bet it does, +62, -113, and -125VDC on those.

    #5 1 year ago

    A couple of things...

    Pinballs have been made various ways, so there isn't a simple answer to the safety question. A model-T ford had a safety problem where you needed to skillfully avoid the crank when you crank started the engine... other, later models didn't have that safety concern.

    Similarly, old Gottliebs connected 120v to the start button, insulated by a strip of paper that could wear through...

    Jersey Jack pinballs have 120V going quite a few more places than a Stern home pin has.

    For modern pinballs I tell people that the 50V coil voltage on the bottom of the playfield will HURT, and then you pull your hand away quickly and cut yourself on something sharp.

    An astonishingly low amount of electrical current will KILL YOU if it catches you at the right cycle of your heart. Safety first.

    The 'Lazy guide' is to remove power from the machine before you kill yourself.

    The practical guide is to know what you are looking at. To know that 120V kills more people than any other voltage. To know what poor insulation looks like and to LOOK FOR poorly insulated 120v wires. To keep one hand in your back pocket so that electricity doesn't travel from your left hand through your heart to your right hand. To understand the risk of +100v and -100 volt wires coming out of the same plug.

    Mostly it's experience, and be afraid.

    'There are old electricians, and bold electricians, but there are no old bold electricians.'

    Safety first, and don't even consider being 'Lazy' about it.

    #6 1 year ago

    HV doesn't seem to bother this guy...

    His last line about fear is priceless.

    #7 1 year ago

    It's interesting most electric chairs are based on the 2300v supply. This is probably more a function of what's available at a prison than what would work best. Of course, too high a voltage would create localized heating problems, for sure, so that needs to be considered. My guess is 4000v with plenty of amps would be ideal.

    #8 1 year ago
    Quoted from GregCon:

    It's interesting most electric chairs are based on the 2300v supply. This is probably more a function of what's available at a prison than what would work best. Of course, too high a voltage would create localized heating problems, for sure, so that needs to be considered. My guess is 4000v with plenty of amps would be ideal.

    Wiki:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrical_injury

    You'd be surprised. This 12v neon transformer sits in your palm, up to 4,500 volts (self adjusting) at 30 milliamp, just exactly the current that the wiki says can kill you if it hits the right cycle of your heart:

    https://www.firehouseneon.com/products/12-volt-neon-transformer-power-supply?srsltid=AR57-fCHd13t-B5iLOY7BM1Egf4SSO2kw2AFA4J3xtIqUfel6uDs3c_JLoQ

    Now think about circus voltaire that actually has a slightly smaller version to run it's neon tube.

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