(Topic ID: 300148)

One weak flipper

By wesley

47 days ago


Topic Heartbeat

Topic Stats

  • 11 posts
  • 8 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 45 days ago by jrpinball
  • No one calls this topic a favorite

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#1 47 days ago

Just replaced 2 flippers on my Bowling Queen. Now, somehow one got weak. Anyone help, please.

#2 47 days ago

End of stroke switches have good clean contacts. Make sure they are until flipper up. Also cabinet switches, pit free clean.

#3 47 days ago

Funny though. It worked perfectly until I put the new flipper shaft in. Now, somehow it went weak.

#4 47 days ago

Also check for binding. Does the plunger slide in and retract easily?

#5 47 days ago

Yes it does. No binding or resistance. Just weak power to the flipper. I push down on the sleeve on the left one,and it pops back sharply. The other one, when I do the same action, it retracts slowly. Even when I play a game, the flipper stays upright, but after about 5 secs it will come back to the idle position.

#6 47 days ago

Check your flipper lever. Is it set too tight against the flipper bushing?

#7 47 days ago

I just can’t keep silent… going to blow!

So another question related to a mechanical issue... Did you leave some lash or “space” so the flipper bat can “float” in the playfield hole?

“Flippers” don’t only actuate because of “power” flowing to them, the strength at which they actuate is actually caused by a “grounding of that power”. That power is flowing through them (active) at all times.

The grounding only happens if the EOS is functioning properly. With the game idle and off, testing for zero resistance at the solder TABS of the EOS is critical. None of this “it looks good” stuff. Get a meter, test it.

Likewise, at the flipper buttons on the cabinet, with the game off, closing the switch should show zero resistance when tested with a meter.

Those two points are your connections for the flippers to have nice solid “grounds”.

Once these two items are tested with a meter, we can move on to much less likely causes (coil bad, etc.)

Your symptom of “flipper retracts slowly” in your last post screams of a loose/faulty connection as explained here. I would test the flipper coils resistance with a meter too and compare it to your other flipper coil too. That would help rule out a bad coil.

My guess is you will (for a temp fix) need an Emory board to clean the tits of the switches or, better yet to order some new EOS/cab switches or a wire is loose where the coil’s magnet core winding hits its solder pad or, at the cabinet’s flipper switches/buttons.

#8 46 days ago

Hate to be pedantic but power doesn’t ‘flow’ through the flippers all the time. It only ‘flows’ when there is a complete circuit and in doing so creates the magnetic field which actuates the flipper.

I’m not sure I’m reading this right when the op says the flipper takes around 5 seconds to fall back. Is this after the flipper button is released or when it’s still held down? If it takes 5s to return to rest after release then it’s a mechanical issue with binding or spring, not an electrical prob. It can of course have both going on too!

#9 46 days ago

Not sure what you are referring to here. The coils are always live when in game play mode. Meaning power is connected to both lugs at all times.

You can lick them with your hand on the side rail to see! (Do not actually do this!)

The power touches all the lugs. If not flowing from one lug to the next, call it whatever you want, connecting, linked. Sure, it doesn’t “flow” until it’s grounded, that’s understood here. This is pinball tech help here, we’re not making revolutionary technical progress toward a better humanity.

The momentary grounding of a coil is what makes the action in pinball. No need to stumble over my poor word choices.

#10 45 days ago

I had a similar issue with one weak flipper. What I found was that the return spring tension was too tight. I removed and anchored the return spring to the next screw (120 degrees) but it was then too loose so the flipper would not return to it's normal position. My fix was to drill a new hole 60 degrees from the original mount. Problem solved.

#11 45 days ago
Quoted from scasten:

I had a similar issue with one weak flipper. What I found was that the return spring tension was too tight. I removed and anchored the return spring to the next screw (120 degrees) but it was then too loose so the flipper would not return to it's normal position. My fix was to drill a new hole 60 degrees from the original mount. Problem solved.

I've done that.

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