(Topic ID: 291076)

Older pinball players -- pinball in retirement community?

By Carmoney

6 months ago


Topic Heartbeat

Topic Stats

  • 26 posts
  • 24 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 6 months ago by pinnyheadhead
  • Topic is favorited by 2 Pinsiders

You

Linked Games

No games have been linked to this topic.

    Topic Gallery

    View topic image gallery

    24EA56D5-2AC1-4FCD-99E4-ED0AB084D9FD (resized).jpeg

    #1 6 months ago

    I was on the phone this evening with my dad (who is in his 70s and lives in a modest retirement community in Florida), and three separate times he mentioned that I should send one of my pinball machines down there to him. He also reminded me that he was a pretty good pinball player back in the day! He was kidding around, of course, but since that conversation I have begun to think seriously about buying him a machine.

    The first problem is that he has no extra room at his place--but I was thinking maybe it could be placed at the community center, where all the members could enjoy playing it. (It's a co-op arrangement where the community property, building, pool, etc. are jointly owned by the members.)

    Be honest with me--is this a good idea? Do most folks in their later years have the ability to still enjoy pinball? Or would eyesight issues and slowing reflexes just make it frustrating? I'm imagining all the old-timers having fun playing the machine, competing, and interacting with each other. But I'm afraid I might be projecting my own personal passion for pinball a little too far. Y'know, like a little kid who buys his parents a toy for Christmas that he really wants for himself!

    Boredom is a huge problem for my dad. His physical capacities are somewhat limited, and it's not real easy for him to travel. I would really like to help him find some stuff to do that doesn't involve the TV and sitting around in his chair all the time.

    I would like to hear what you Pinside guys think of this idea--and I would particularly like to hear from any older players who happen to notice this topic and have first-hand experience that is relevant.

    Thanks!
    Mike

    #2 6 months ago

    Be fun if you can make it happen. I'm sure some there might enjoy it.

    The games might have to be on free play, and maintained.

    LTG : )

    #3 6 months ago

    Now that he has asked..hard to turn him down.
    But LTG is right, maintenance could become an issue unless there was a local Operator that a deal could be made with.

    #4 6 months ago

    Pool table, shuffle alley or ping pong table is better. More socializing, better pacing for older people and no worries about a ball getting stuck thus ending the fun.

    #5 6 months ago
    Quoted from Carmoney:

    I was on the phone this evening with my dad (who is in his 70s and lives in a modest retirement community in Florida), and three separate times he mentioned that I should send one of my pinball machines down there to him. He also reminded me that he was a pretty good pinball player back in the day! He was kidding around, of course, but since that conversation I have begun to think seriously about buying him a machine.
    The first problem is that he has no extra room at his place--but I was thinking maybe it could be placed at the community center, where all the members could enjoy playing it. (It's a co-op arrangement where the community property, building, pool, etc. are jointly owned by the members.)
    Be honest with me--is this a good idea? Do most folks in their later years have the ability to still enjoy pinball? Or would eyesight issues and slowing reflexes just make it frustrating? I'm imagining all the old-timers having fun playing the machine, competing, and interacting with each other. But I'm afraid I might be projecting my own personal passion for pinball a little too far. Y'know, like a little kid who buys his parents a toy for Christmas that he really wants for himself!
    Boredom is a huge problem for my dad. His physical capacities are somewhat limited, and it's not real easy for him to travel. I would really like to help him find some stuff to do that doesn't involve the TV and sitting around in his chair all the time.
    I would like to hear what you Pinside guys think of this idea--and I would particularly like to hear from any older players who happen to notice this topic and have first-hand experience that is relevant.
    Thanks!
    Mike

    We have a few oldies (over 75) that love coming to our place to play our Pinball machines. I think it is a fantastic idea if you can make it happen. If you love pinball, you love pinball no matter what your age. My mother and father in law (outlaws!) are constantly trying to invite themselves over to play the games. One of the other oldies is quite capable and has regularly put up some GC scores that are hard to beat. If my Dad wanted a game at his place I would put any game he wanted in there and he is 92. The last year has not been very nice for him so if I can do anything to put a smile on his face , I would do it.

    #6 6 months ago

    Maybe consider a good working EM? Maybe others can speak to this, but I think it might be more reliable/less maintenance than a SS or DMD pin. The folks there might identify with it better than a newer machine.

    #7 6 months ago

    Back in my day we didn't have flippers!

    #8 6 months ago
    Quoted from Carmoney:

    I was on the phone this evening with my dad (who is in his 70s and lives in a modest retirement community in Florida), and three separate times he mentioned that I should send one of my pinball machines down there to him. He also reminded me that he was a pretty good pinball player back in the day! He was kidding around, of course, but since that conversation I have begun to think seriously about buying him a machine.
    The first problem is that he has no extra room at his place--but I was thinking maybe it could be placed at the community center, where all the members could enjoy playing it. (It's a co-op arrangement where the community property, building, pool, etc. are jointly owned by the members.)
    Be honest with me--is this a good idea? Do most folks in their later years have the ability to still enjoy pinball? Or would eyesight issues and slowing reflexes just make it frustrating? I'm imagining all the old-timers having fun playing the machine, competing, and interacting with each other. But I'm afraid I might be projecting my own personal passion for pinball a little too far. Y'know, like a little kid who buys his parents a toy for Christmas that he really wants for himself!
    Boredom is a huge problem for my dad. His physical capacities are somewhat limited, and it's not real easy for him to travel. I would really like to help him find some stuff to do that doesn't involve the TV and sitting around in his chair all the time.
    I would like to hear what you Pinside guys think of this idea--and I would particularly like to hear from any older players who happen to notice this topic and have first-hand experience that is relevant.
    Thanks!
    Mike

    Old people love pinball. You act like they’re walking skeletons. My grandmother enjoys pinball and she’s 80. She constantly talks about how they played them on the boardwalk for a nickel. Shuffle alley would definitely be more popular because it’s a great game to talk and play at the same time causally.

    There are tons of Pinballers in Florida. Try and find a local guy and see if you can strike a deal for them to be maintained. Go for a pinball person, operators don’t care if it’s not making them money.

    A solid EM will make their year. It brings back great memories and they’re fun to play over and over.

    #9 6 months ago

    I've often thought about opening a pinball players/owners retirement community. Bring your collection with you and get a discount on your condo.

    #10 6 months ago

    Buy him a real nice ss game that's not too deep, 8 ball, sinbad etc. A newer pin is confusing to new into hobby people. I think they would love it , and if not, sell .

    #11 6 months ago

    Get him a game! What a fantastic idea. I think putting it in a community center is also a great idea. Everyone can enjoy it. I think WNBJM would be a hit with the older guys!

    #12 6 months ago

    Your dad has indicated he would play the game. Don't worry if others at his community would not be interested. Let them sort themselves as to who steps up to play and who doesn't. He's asking you for this! My dad has passed and I would have loved to have done that for him!

    #13 6 months ago

    I took my 80 year old father-in-law to a pinball show a few years ago and he had an absolute blast playing a Gottlieb 300.

    24EA56D5-2AC1-4FCD-99E4-ED0AB084D9FD (resized).jpeg
    #14 6 months ago

    Thanks for the comments. I agree that ongoing maintenance could be an issue. I could give him one of my machines that has been proven reliable, and I could train him on the basics of cleaning and maintenance. As a backup, I suspect that I could locate a pinball enthusiast in the area who might be willing to help take care of the machine.

    So here's another idea I had.....what about a virtual pinball machine? It's not quite the real thing, but it would offer a variety of games in a smaller space, and would presumably avoid the physical maintenance issues that would accompany a real pin.

    #15 6 months ago
    Quoted from Hayfarmer:

    Buy him a real nice ss game that's not too deep, 8 ball, sinbad etc. A newer pin is confusing to new into hobby people. I think they would love it , and if not, sell .

    Yeah, a simple 70s or 80s SS or EM, but which has been totally gone thru. Not one that was simply fixed enough that it works. You go thru an EM right and they are very solid for a long long time, my experience anyway, even the multiplayers.

    #16 6 months ago

    I would definitely get him a pinball machine. My father in 74 and I let him borrow my joker poker about 6 years ago and he's obsessed with it. They go down south for the winter so I actually ended up buying him a second machine and shipped it to him down south so he can play it where ever he is. Maintenance hasn't been a huge issue because his neighbor is a handy guy or if he's not available I'll facetime with him to walk thru the issue. He even calls PB resource and talks to Steve to gets his parts and seems to enjoy that process.

    #17 6 months ago

    My Dad loved to play my Aztec. Dad was always in the gameroom with the Kids at family get togethers. After Dad`s stroke the Doctors said playing pinball would help regain Dad's eye-hand coordination.

    #18 6 months ago

    I'm 66 and play every day. I think you'd find older folks that probably played a lot
    back in the day would really enjoy having some machines to play.

    #19 6 months ago

    This sounds like an absolutely wonderful idea. Placing pinball machines in community centers and retirement homes sounds like a fun idea to keep busy once I retire. I'll have to learn more about EM machines and continue to learn more about the early solid state machines.

    #20 6 months ago

    I'm now 70,and my take on this is; if at some point I haft go to a "retirement center",at least 2 of my favorite pins WILL go with me! However,if I've lost my mind and can't wipe my own ass,I won't care anyway!!

    #21 6 months ago

    I repaired one at a upscale senior living place few years ago, it was a em. Belonged to one of the residents was in room with pool table and slot machine. I service vending machines at few senior living places. Every time I go to these places I think they should have pinball and megatouch there. Something more stimulating than bingo.

    #22 6 months ago

    Do it.
    Anything that will bring joy and bring them together.
    It will keep them sharp.
    Make it something easy to play. SS like 6 million dollar man.

    #23 6 months ago
    Quoted from PinballAir:

    Do it.
    Anything that will bring joy and bring them together.
    It will keep them sharp.
    Make it something easy to play. SS like 6 million dollar man.

    I would think an EM would hit the sweet spot for the over 70 crowd. Simple and nostalgic.

    #24 6 months ago
    Quoted from CrazyLevi:

    Back in my day we didn't have flippers!

    Dang!

    #25 6 months ago

    He's quoting a callout from TSPP

    #26 6 months ago

    I will do the other side. I think it’s not a good idea. You don’t live in the area. No one will be there to take care of it. Are you insuring it in case someones Grandkids shock themselves? Those communities can be pretty empty off season. How often will your Dad or anyone really play it? Did I mention no one is there to take care of a game you are putting on location in another state?

    Hey there! Got a moment?

    Great to see you're enjoying Pinside! Did you know Pinside is able to run thanks to donations from our visitors? Please donate to Pinside, support the site and get anext to your username to show for it! Donate to Pinside