(Topic ID: 307664)

NVRAM Weebly sell assembled rectifier board?

By pindude80

2 years ago


Topic Heartbeat

Topic Stats

You

Linked Games

Topic Gallery

View topic image gallery

image_67191553 (resized).JPG
image_67212801 (resized).JPG
#1 2 years ago

I need a new rectifier board for my Harlem Globetrotters. I was planning on getting an assembed board from NVRAM Weebly. I just looked on his site and didn't see one; I only saw the bare board and DIY kit. Does anyone know if he still sells the assembled board?

#2 2 years ago

NVRAM and assembled rectifier boards have been a Covid casualty over at B&I for a while now. I will say this, if you have good soldering skills building the rectifier kit is not difficult.

#3 2 years ago

I have built at least 6...they are SUPER easy!

go for it!

#4 2 years ago

I have pretty much canceled the assembled rectifier board. Too much labor that can't be automated, too much competition driving assembled price down. I made the DIY kit have an attractive price. You still have to solder on the transformer wires to the assembled board anyways.

NVRAM is a victim of the chip shortage. It is pretty much the only part number having massive problems with. Close to ten years ago I could get as many reels of FM16W08 core chip I wanted for $1.85 per chip. Price kept creeping up with cypress. Infineon bought Cypress and the pandemic happened. FM16W08 is extremely hard to find and when you do, the vendors can want up to 10x what the cost used to be. I am seeing estimated arrival dates getting pushed back into 2023. =(. The few I am able to scrounge up must be used on MPU boards. I would rather sell a $150 mpu and be out of stock of a $15 module vs the opposite.

Parallel RAM is just not that popular and there is only one manufacturer. Maybe everspin will release a MRAM or a Chinese company will compete with FM16W08 and drive the price down and availability up. As far as I know there is only one factory in the world setup to make FM16W08.

#5 2 years ago

I'm getting ready to solder your kit this week, needed to learn how to solder first.
Quick question in regards to that: are there any recommended components so I can instead of soldering the wires directly to a through hole pad to something like a screw terminal or something? Soldering wires to pads is arguably still my weakest skill.
Thank you.

#6 2 years ago
Quoted from T3quila:

I'm getting ready to solder your kit this week, needed to learn how to solder first.
Quick question in regards to that: are there any recommended components so I can instead of soldering the wires directly to a through hole pad to something like a screw terminal or something? Soldering wires to pads is arguably still my weakest skill.
Thank you.

I suppose you could put a screw terminal at every single transformer wire connection. I wouldn't recommend it, but you can do whatever you like. Another brand does this. I would be worried the corroded wires going high resistance burning up. A few connections are going to be high current, but you can find appropriately rated terminals.

The issue with the transformer wires is they are often corroded. You strip back the wire many inches and it is still all corroded and will not want to accept solder. You can fray out the wires and try and to abrasively knock off some of the corrosion. Re tin the wire. Then solder it to the board. Make sure to heat the circuit board hole and wire at the same time. Once hot enough the solder should just flow nicely. If you can't get the solder to flow, try a bigger iron tip and increase the temperature. This circuit board is made with double thick copper and the traces are all very wide which act as a heat sink sucking the heat off your iron tip.

Someone makes a new transformer to rect wiring harness, sorry I forget who. If the transformer tap wires are really nasty, consider getting new ones. Should make it easier to solder.

#7 2 years ago
Quoted from barakandl:

I have pretty much canceled the assembled rectifier board. Too much labor that can't be automated, too much competition driving assembled price down. I made the DIY kit have an attractive price. You still have to solder on the transformer wires to the assembled board anyways.
NVRAM is a victim of the chip shortage. It is pretty much the only part number having massive problems with. Close to ten years ago I could get as many reels of FM16W08 core chip I wanted for $1.85 per chip. Price kept creeping up with cypress. Infineon bought Cypress and the pandemic happened. FM16W08 is extremely hard to find and when you do, the vendors can want up to 10x what the cost used to be. I am seeing estimated arrival dates getting pushed back into 2023. =(. The few I am able to scrounge up must be used on MPU boards. I would rather sell a $150 mpu and be out of stock of a $15 module vs the opposite.
Parallel RAM is just not that popular and there is only one manufacturer. Maybe everspin will release a MRAM or a Chinese company will compete with FM16W08 and drive the price down and availability up. As far as I know there is only one factory in the world setup to make FM16W08.

I also noticed my common suppliers selling the smallest quantity of resistors as 100. Sure, I'll take 100 in common values and be set. I don't need 100 of some off the wall value I need once. Frustrating. I like to use the same brand of resistors throughout my projects if possible [type-A personality problem], so I hate mixing and matching vendors. I am also waiting on a chip from Analog Devices. Over 6 months and maybe more.

#8 2 years ago

You can buy packs of 1000pcs 1/4w resistor for $3 in a common value and about $4 less common value stripped off the tape neatly put in bags right from china. Every time you need a value, get a bag for $4. Or buy one of those China kits with 100pcs of every common value in a neat little carrying case. Simple passives are pretty much all made in China anyways. When you buy them from domestic sellers you are paying for the labor of handling them, often to the tune of 10x-15x over wholesale value.

I kind of don't blame people not wanting to sell small amounts of resistors. Think about counting them piddly things out when they have a wholesale value of $0.004. Even with a device to count off a taped reel, its still a lot of work for small amounts $.

I mostly use "jelly bean" parts with a bunch of different manufacturers so I have not had too much trouble, but did use some HGSemi, HLF, and etc active parts when TI and Nexperia or whatever western brand chip was OOS.

#9 2 years ago
Quoted from barakandl:

I suppose you could put a screw terminal at every single transformer wire connection. I wouldn't recommend it, but you can do whatever you like. Another brand does this. I would be worried the corroded wires going high resistance burning up. A few connections are going to be high current, but you can find appropriately rated terminals.
The issue with the transformer wires is they are often corroded. You strip back the wire many inches and it is still all corroded and will not want to accept solder. You can fray out the wires and try and to abrasively knock off some of the corrosion. Re tin the wire. Then solder it to the board. Make sure to heat the circuit board hole and wire at the same time. Once hot enough the solder should just flow nicely. If you can't get the solder to flow, try a bigger iron tip and increase the temperature. This circuit board is made with double thick copper and the traces are all very wide which act as a heat sink sucking the heat off your iron tip.
Someone makes a new transformer to rect wiring harness, sorry I forget who. If the transformer tap wires are really nasty, consider getting new ones. Should make it easier to solder.

I did get a new wiring harness. IIRC it was from Third Coast Pinball. Thanks for the advise, I'll just practice some more. I bought some blank PCBs to practice on that - should come soon.

#10 2 years ago
Quoted from barakandl:

You can buy packs of 1000pcs 1/4w resistor for $3 in a common value and about $4 less common value stripped off the tape neatly put in bags right from china. Every time you need a value, get a bag for $4. Or buy one of those China kits with 100pcs of every common value in a neat little carrying case. Simple passives are pretty much all made in China anyways. When you buy them from domestic sellers you are paying for the labor of handling them, often to the tune of 10x-15x over wholesale value.
I kind of don't blame people not wanting to sell small amounts of resistors. Think about counting them piddly things out when they have a wholesale value of $0.004. Even with a device to count off a taped reel, its still a lot of work for small amounts $.
I mostly use "jelly bean" parts with a bunch of different manufacturers so I have not had too much trouble, but did use some HGSemi, HLF, and etc active parts when TI and Nexperia or whatever western brand chip was OOS.

It's dealing with the quantities in my component bins. We are all hoarders of sorts already. Last thing I need is another box of stuff around because it was overflow from my parts bins.

Counting individual components kills me every time I order one of something. The big vendors pay someone to count and stuff it in a bag. People need jobs and local suppliers are non-existent. The way of the world?!?!?!?

#11 2 years ago
Quoted from barakandl:

I suppose you could put a screw terminal at every single transformer wire connection. I wouldn't recommend it, but you can do whatever you like. Another brand does this. I would be worried the corroded wires going high resistance burning up. A few connections are going to be high current, but you can find appropriately rated terminals.
The issue with the transformer wires is they are often corroded. You strip back the wire many inches and it is still all corroded and will not want to accept solder. You can fray out the wires and try and to abrasively knock off some of the corrosion. Re tin the wire. Then solder it to the board. Make sure to heat the circuit board hole and wire at the same time. Once hot enough the solder should just flow nicely. If you can't get the solder to flow, try a bigger iron tip and increase the temperature. This circuit board is made with double thick copper and the traces are all very wide which act as a heat sink sucking the heat off your iron tip.
Someone makes a new transformer to rect wiring harness, sorry I forget who. If the transformer tap wires are really nasty, consider getting new ones. Should make it easier to solder.

I always change out the transformer wires at this point. Get the correct color and length from Third coast right here on pinside!

image_67212801 (resized).JPGimage_67212801 (resized).JPG
#12 2 years ago
Quoted from barakandl:

I suppose you could put a screw terminal at every single transformer wire connection. I wouldn't recommend it, but you can do whatever you like. Another brand does this. I would be worried the corroded wires going high resistance burning up. A few connections are going to be high current, but you can find appropriately rated terminals.
The issue with the transformer wires is they are often corroded. You strip back the wire many inches and it is still all corroded and will not want to accept solder. You can fray out the wires and try and to abrasively knock off some of the corrosion. Re tin the wire. Then solder it to the board. Make sure to heat the circuit board hole and wire at the same time. Once hot enough the solder should just flow nicely. If you can't get the solder to flow, try a bigger iron tip and increase the temperature. This circuit board is made with double thick copper and the traces are all very wide which act as a heat sink sucking the heat off your iron tip.
Someone makes a new transformer to rect wiring harness, sorry I forget who. If the transformer tap wires are really nasty, consider getting new ones. Should make it easier to solder.

I put new wires on Transformer with a new power board... I get the correct color and length from 3rd. coast right here on Pinside!
Don't worry about Soldering!
Believe me, if I can do it...anyone can!

P.S. Powered Toast man???

Thanks Barakandl for still selling those( boy, do I miss the LDB kits , but totally understand why they are now sold assembled)
image_67191553 (resized).JPGimage_67191553 (resized).JPG

#13 2 years ago

If you can handle soldering the wires from the transformer to the board, you can handle putting the kit together. It's a great way to get some soldering practice on a forgiving board if you are new to soldering.

It's amazing how many people I've seen solder and they hold the tip in the air, melt solder onto it, and bring it to the joint. One was my boss at the time and he didn't like it too much when I told him he was doing it wrong. He also thought that toggle switch terminals with holes in them didn't make as good a connection as just a solid tab.

#14 2 years ago

Big fan of the DIY rectifier board kit. Built one last year for a Paragon. They are back in stock and just received 2 more. Price is great.

Promoted items from Pinside Marketplace and Pinside Shops!
$ 199.95
$ 10.00
4,000 (OBO)
Machine - For Sale
Lafayette, IN
4,999 (OBO)
Machine - For Sale
Grandview, MO
From: $ 3.50
Playfield - Other
Rocket City Pinball
 
$ 8.00
Electronics
Third Coast Pinball
 
$ 10.95
Eproms
Pinballrom
 
$ 18.95
Eproms
Pinballrom
 

Reply

Wanna join the discussion? Please sign in to reply to this topic.

Hey there! Welcome to Pinside!

Donate to Pinside

Great to see you're enjoying Pinside! Did you know Pinside is able to run without any 3rd-party banners or ads, thanks to the support from our visitors? Please consider a donation to Pinside and get anext to your username to show for it! Or better yet, subscribe to Pinside+!


This page was printed from and we tried optimising it for printing. Some page elements may have been deliberately hidden.

Scan the QR code on the left to jump to the URL this document was printed from.