(Topic ID: 194575)

NVRAM adaptor boards for System 11A (open source)


By lyonsden

1 year ago



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  • 16 posts
  • 7 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 1 year ago by lyonsden
  • Topic is favorited by 6 Pinsiders

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Fusion PCB Manufacturing   Prototype PCB Assembly   Seeed Studio (1) (resized).png
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#1 1 year ago

I designed a FM1608-120-PG to 6116 adaptor board. This board rewires the FM1608-120-PG NVRAM chip to the pinout of the 6116 (24-pins) and is needed for System 11A boards which do not have the extra pins slots for the 28-pins of a FM1608-120-PG NVRAM chip. I'm happy to report that the board worked perfectly (sample size is 1 of 1; currently in a Pinbot).

I've made the boards open source: https://github.com/elyons/professor_pinball_boards/tree/master/NVRAM

If you want to order them, you can just submit the .zip file in the "Gerber" directory of the GitHub repo to Seeed Studio and get 10 made for $5-10 (plus shipping). The board files are for Eagle, which you can use to generate gerber files for other manufactures.

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#2 1 year ago

Very cool! And bravo for making this open source

#3 1 year ago

Someone asked how to place a seeed order for these boards. To do this, go to: https://www.seeedstudio.com/fusion_pcb.html

Drop in the zip file (in the gerber directory) and you can keep all the default options (though I selected red PCB boards).

Fusion PCB Manufacturing Prototype PCB Assembly Seeed Studio (1) (resized).png

#4 1 year ago

Awesome, thanks. They tag you a bit on shipping, but the cost is still under $2.50 a board.

#5 1 year ago

Applauding you for doing this and keeping it open source!

#6 1 year ago

That's a nice free gesture. I thought of creating some DIP adapter nvram boards and putting them out for free a few years back, but I'm pretty unclear of how support and liability would work on open sourced designs in general. I figured regardless if you offer something for FREE or $100.. if it can be tied back to you, it increases your exposure since you were the person that put it out there. Not really a settling thought to me, so I never went down that free path heavily. There's simple diagnostic tools I'd have put out for free otherwise. It's all exposure though if people misuse the stuff, at least that's how I see it.

Maybe open source hardware doesn't work that way. But take a more extreme example of a design that works with mains voltage & makes it easier for someone to injure themselves or their property -- and it can be tied back to the designer. I'd think there'd be some liability concern there.

Just some thoughts I've had a long the way. Kudos for offering something up for free like this, hopefully you don't find the support or liability aspect to be an issue. As I said, I really don't have a clear idea of either -- just assumptions. Uncharted territory for me and I'll probably keep it that way.

#7 1 year ago
Quoted from acebathound:

That's a nice free gesture. I thought of creating some DIP adapter nvram boards and putting them out for free a few years back, but I'm pretty unclear of how support and liability would work on open sourced designs in general. I figured regardless if you offer something for FREE or $100.. if it can be tied back to you, it increases your exposure since you were the person that put it out there. Not really a settling thought to me, so I never went down that free path heavily. There's simple diagnostic tools I'd have put out for free otherwise. It's all exposure though if people misuse the stuff, at least that's how I see it.
Maybe open source hardware doesn't work that way. But take a more extreme example of a design that works with mains voltage & makes it easier for someone to injure themselves or their property -- and it can be tied back to the designer. I'd think there'd be some liability concern there.
Just some thoughts I've had a long the way. Kudos for offering something up for free like this, hopefully you don't find the support or liability aspect to be an issue. As I said, I really don't have a clear idea of either -- just assumptions. Uncharted territory for me and I'll probably keep it that way.

Simply put, pick a license that states your liability. I modified the MIT open source license used in open source software:

------

Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy of this design and associated documentation files (the "Design"), to deal in the Board Design without restriction, including without limitation the rights to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies of the Design, and to permit persons to whom the Design is furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:

The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in all copies or substantial portions of the Board Design.

THE BOARD DESIGN IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM, OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE DESIGN OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN THE DESIGN.

------
Of course, my favorite license is: http://www.wtfpl.net/txt/copying/ , but it doesn't have a warranty or liability claim.

#8 1 year ago
Quoted from johninc:

Awesome, thanks. They tag you a bit on shipping, but the cost is still under $2.50 a board.

Yeah -- I usually wait till I have two or three designs I need made, then do an order. Another option is to get a couple of friends together and get several sets of 10 (cheaper that way than ordering more than 10, IIRC).

#9 1 year ago

Well good luck It's nice to have other DIY options out there for sure.

For people building these boards, better to get the "2.54 round machine pin male headers" than use 2.54 square pin headers. The square pins will be harder to insert into the socket & stretch the IC socket contacts out to the point a normal DIP chip would then just fall out. The round pin headers are much thinner in diameter.

#10 1 year ago
Quoted from acebathound:

For people building these boards, better to get the "2.54 round machine pin male headers" than use 2.54 square pin headers. The square pins will be harder to insert into the socket & stretch the IC socket contacts out to the point a normal DIP chip would then just fall out. The round pin headers are much thinner in diameter.

Agreed -- I just was using what I had on hand.

#11 1 year ago

Just a suggestion, I'd keep the copper fills away from the through-hole pads a bit more.. or not have them running between pads at all. They look very close to pads, even at pin #28 for the +5V to the RAMTRON. A small scrape on the filled zone could easily then cause a short to GND (top-side). Assuming there's a fill on the bottom side, same issue.

IMHO copper fills seem like a great idea, but I've seen them cause problems. One case was a small regulator that had a fill near the mounting screw-hole.. and star washer bit into the filled area, along with a nearby trace & created a short.

#12 1 year ago

I use copper planes ("fills" or "pours" depending on specific software being used) for all boards. They greatly improve connectivity to signals connected to the planes (usually ground) and can work great as a 'built in heatsink' for certain parts. However, their spacing does look pretty small on this board. Appears to be in <10mil and maybe about 6mil spacing for that one. For the issue with the star washer hitting into the plane - that was somebody's design or implementation flaw. The pad should have been larger or the star washer should have been smaller or an insulator (e.g. mica insulating washer) should have been added.

The only thing I would recommend on this one --> square 0.025" posts are not great for mounting this sort of thing. If you don't think so - ask ANYBODY that has worked on a Gottlieb System 80B CPU board. Use round 0.019 pin strips and plug these into standard DIP sockets. Costs a bit more but very well worth it.

1 month later
#13 1 year ago

Finally put one of these together and put it in my Fire!, works great. Thanks lyonsden!

#14 1 year ago
Quoted from johninc:

Finally put one of these together and put it in my Fire!, works great. Thanks lyonsden!

Nice. Glad this helped someone out.

2 weeks later
#15 1 year ago

All of my parts finally arrived. I assembled and installed in my #F-14 Tomcat. Everything works perfectly. Thanks Professor!

#16 1 year ago
Quoted from cletus:

All of my parts finally arrived. I assembled and installed in my #F-14 Tomcat. Everything works perfectly. Thanks Professor!

Happy to help and glad to hear that it worked without any problems.

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