(Topic ID: 185638)

Nudging. How do I do it right?


By Damien

2 years ago



Topic Stats

  • 19 posts
  • 14 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 1 year ago by Charger500
  • Topic is favorited by 7 Pinsiders

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#1 2 years ago

I am fairly new to the hobby, but a long time gamer. As a kid, I would play pinball, but never got into the technical stuff.

Now that I have a couple of machines at home, and I would love to be able to improve my skills. I've started trying to nudge the machine, and it seems I'm gaining a bit more control.

I was reading some posts, and saw countless comments about using sliders and other things to make it easy for the machines to move around the floor. I have my pins on very smooth laminate flooring, so if I do not use rubber feet, they slide around if you nudge.

I have a MMR, and before putting rubber feet on, it seems like a nudge from the side would move the machine more than the ball. Once I put the rubber feet on, I got more control in redirecting the ball.

So my question is... Do you not want resistance to be able to nudge more effectively? Does it make more sense to have a machine that stays in place or moves around when you nudge?

Thank you all

#2 2 years ago

The feet should not move when nudging. Also on some machines I have I can tighten the leg bolts too tight and there is no give in the machine. Loosening a quarter turn after tightening can help a bunch but don't loosen too much.

I don't make big moves when nudging but instead give little hits with my hand to the front and sides. It helps a bunch with saving the ball from the outlanes. Upper playfield nudging is important as well but something not a lot of guys focus on. Bumping the ball to complete the upper inlanes or keep the ball in the pops to complete an objective is an important skill. Also controlling feeds from the upper playfield like in TWD is important to avoid SDTM drains.

Keep the tilt tight to keep your nudging under control. What games do have? Maybe some of us can give you places to focus your nudging.

#3 2 years ago

#4 2 years ago

If you're always playing at home, set up your games how you like them. I wouldn't recommend loosening the leg bolts at all as someone suggested, it will damage the cabinet. If anything just raise the leg levelers a bit all around and you should find it's a bit easier to nudge.

My biggest advice for getting better is to nudge *all the time*, and focus on nudging upwards and cabinet slaps instead of just nudging left/right. Many people start learning by trying to nudge in the outlanes to save a ball, but the more you do before you're in trouble, the better. Nudge in the slings, in the pops, whenever a ball hits a control surface, when the ball comes off a rail, and even when passing or doing a dead bounce.

#5 2 years ago
Quoted from Law:

wouldn't recommend loosening the leg bolts at all as someone suggested, it will damage the cabinet.

Well I did say not too much and to be careful.

Maybe I tighten my leg bolts to tight to begin with. I don't know.

#6 2 years ago

I tend to nudge "up", as I feel like this gives you some extra bounce off of rubbers as the ball is hitting it. This is especially effective on a game like STTNG that's notorious for its right outlane. Normally the ball gets sucked right down, but with a nudge up as it is about to hit the right along, it'll go high enough to ricochet off of the yellow stand up targets and back into play almost every time.

#7 2 years ago
Quoted from Law:

My biggest advice for getting better is to nudge *all the time*, and focus on nudging upwards and cabinet slaps instead of just nudging left/right.

This is what I did to help my game. I went from crappy to longer lasting crappy. Still have a ways to go to exit the crap phase.

#8 2 years ago

I'll train you, we can start with you painting my fence

#9 2 years ago
Quoted from timtim:

I'll train you, we can start with you painting my fence

meee (resized).jpeg

#10 2 years ago
Quoted from dmbjunky:

What games do have? Maybe some of us can give you places to focus your nudging.

MMR and TZ.

With rubber feet on my MMR, I can actually nudge it hard on the sides and save SDTM balls sometimes. Not sure if I should be putting that much into the nudge though

With TZ, it's tough to save those SDTM because of the sheer weight and size of the machine. But I do find the bumps up do save some of the side drains, and help me get out of danger on the slingshots.

I was at a local meet the other day, and I saw a lot of people sort of slapping the flipper button, rather than just pushing them as I do. Not sure how they were doing it, but they were kicking my ass in head-to-head matches hahaha!

#11 2 years ago


#12 2 years ago
Quoted from jorro:

» YouTube video
» YouTube video

Thanks! I had watched those before, and they were definitely helpful!

#13 2 years ago

Forward nudge all the time to get it out of the inlane/ outlane area. And if it does get in that area, you want vertical motion to get a vertical bounce down into the inlane vs horizontal motion where the ball travels laterally into the outlane.

#14 2 years ago
Quoted from Snailman:

Forward nudge all the time to get it out of the inlane/ outlane area

Yes! Not sure which way to go? Just always go upwards. When it hits the top of the slingshot or inlane/outlane divider, don't let it decide which way to fall...shove into the ball to bounce it back up towards the top of the playfield.

Quoted from Damien:

I have a MMR, and before putting rubber feet on, it seems like a nudge from the side would move the machine more than the ball. Once I put the rubber feet on, I got more control in redirecting the ball.

I think a lot of people incorrectly think that the goal with nudging is to move the ball. It isn't. (There isn't enough friction between the playfield and the ball to make much of a difference.) The goal is to move something into the existing path of the ball to redirect it.

Example: you can tell the ball is heading directly into the outlane. Usually, the best thing to attempt is to move the inlane/outlane divider (which on many modern games has a small round rubber at the top) up and out...into the direct path of the ball. Now, instead of going straight into the outlane, it will hit hopefully the post and head in a different direction.

Quoted from Damien:

So my question is... Do you not want resistance to be able to nudge more effectively? Does it make more sense to have a machine that stays in place or moves around when you nudge?

If the ball is coming STDM, you can attempt a slide save. (I wouldn't necessarily call this nudging, but it does involve moving the machine). The ball is going to continue on the same trajectory regardless of what you do, so your goal is to slide the machine to the side enough that the tip of a flipper has now moved into the path of the ball. (You probably want to flip as you are doing this, so that the flipper is horizontal at the moment that it intersects with the ball...which gives you the furthest "reach").

3 weeks later
#15 1 year ago

Great help. Thanks. Need more practice.

#16 1 year ago

personaly i think nudge is ok , even dough i think it looks realy cool if done proparly but sliding nachine for half meter is kinda cheating, but thats just me

#17 1 year ago
Quoted from jorro:

but sliding nachine for half meter is kinda cheating, but thats just me

You.... Think!
I would hope so.

#18 1 year ago
Quoted from jorro:

but sliding nachine for half meter is kinda cheating

Imo. The tilt decides what's too much and what isn't.

#19 1 year ago

Correct. The owner or operator decides how much nudging is allowed by setting the tilt, the slam tilt, and the tilt warnings. A guy my league will slide it 6" to 8" on some machines. Most ones I've played the tilt is set overly tight, as they don't want someone abusing the machine. My Getaway is set loose but if someone were to really slam it the tilt would get them.

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