(Topic ID: 142211)

No soldering iron required


By KingPinGames

3 years ago



Topic Stats

  • 20 posts
  • 12 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 3 years ago by KingPinGames
  • Topic is favorited by 5 Pinsiders

You

Linked Games

No games have been linked to this topic.

    Topic Gallery

    One image has been uploaded to this topic. (View topic image gallery).

    Soldersleeve1.gif

    #1 3 years ago

    So yeah (a little jab at Nate from Coast 2 Coast Pinball)

    I picked up a cnc machine from this company (www.inventables.com) and some of the customers do not like to solder so they came up with this solution

    http://blog.inventables.com/2015/05/new-product-solder-sleeves.html

    this really would only work for two wires that you wanted to solder together, not a wire to a switch or coil.

    It’s called a solder sleeve, and it joins wires together electrically and mechanically at the same time using these three common items cleverly combined:

    Heat shrink tubing
    Solder
    Hot melt glue

    It’s crazy easy and fast, and requires no soldering iron- just a source of heat such as one of our new heat guns- any heat gun should work, but a hair dryer may not get hot enough.

    The heat melts the solder to form an electrical connection, melts the glue to hold the wires in place, and tightens the heat shrink to form a strain-relief and insulate the exposed wires. All at once. Boom.

    Bonus: The resulting joint is waterproof!

    Solder sleeves solve another related problem- splitting one wire into many, or vice-versa. It’s just as easy (and just as quick) to join a number of wires using the same technique. This is useful in situations like slaving two stepper motors to a single driver, or running multiple connections to the GND of an Arduino:

    looks like a great thing to try out. my only work is that the coating that is on our pinball wires might be too thin and the heat gun would melt them.

    here is a question from the comments on the blog

    Sima said...

    How do you avoid a cold solder joint? Won't the insulation start burning before the solder and wires are at the right temp?

    5/08/2015 10:29 AM

    Jon Baker said...

    These use hi-temp shrink and low-temp solder. Scorching the insulation shouldn't be a problem unless you leave the heat gun on the wire with no shrink over it too long.

    5/08/2015 10:52 AM

    looks great to me. i have no problem soldering, but i can see where this could be useful.

    Soldersleeve1.gif

    #2 3 years ago

    Looks more convenient than soldering wires together and shrink tubing them even, especially for connecting many-to-1. Cool product.

    #3 3 years ago

    I'm looking at picking up their X-Carve, is that what you got?

    #4 3 years ago
    Quoted from Wolfmarsh:

    I'm looking at picking up their X-Carve, is that what you got?

    yeah. i picked up the 1000mm version. i will be putting it together in the next week or so. i have a couple of projects in mind (some pinball related, but most not). for the price i thought it was a good deal. I was also in chicago for expo and just picked it up instead of paying $245 to have it shipped to Wisconsin. You might want to check in to the shipping before ordering. i think the most expensive part to ship is the waste board, which you could make for less than it cost to ship.

    #5 3 years ago
    Quoted from KingPinGames:

    yeah. i picked up the 1000mm version. i will be putting it together in the next week or so. i have a couple of projects in mind (some pinball related, but most not). for the price i thought it was a good deal. I was also in chicago for expo and just picked it up instead of paying $245 to have it shipped to Wisconsin. You might want to check in to the shipping before ordering. i think the most expensive part to ship is the waste board, which you could make for less than it cost to ship.

    Cool, do you mind if I ping you in a couple of weeks to see how you are getting along with it?

    I was going to upgrade one of the axis to 1800mm so I could cut a playfield and a cab. That means I don't need the wasteboard from them anyway.

    What kind of table are you setting yours up on? I was thinking I need to build one so I can level it, etc..

    #6 3 years ago

    I saw these on an EEVblog episode. Looks like Dave had some problems with them. Check around 4min.

    #7 3 years ago
    Quoted from barakandl:

    I saw these on an EEVblog episode. Looks like Dave had some problems with them. Check around 4min.
    » YouTube video

    Yeah that doesn't look good there

    #8 3 years ago

    Tag to check that video in a bit...if these don't suck this would be a huge boon to modders to save some time...but if there's issues...I'm not going to risk other people's games and my credibility to save a minute..

    #9 3 years ago

    I just ordered some and will report back once I try them out.

    Here's a video from one of the manufacturers. If you look at 1:45 I would not call that an acceptable joint (you can skip the rest of the video). Seems like a lot of margin for error.

    #10 3 years ago

    I used those while in the Navy during the late seventies. When you had the right equipment, they worked great. The heat gun we used had a piece that would cradle the connector and circulate the hot air around the entire connector. Three to five seconds, and you had a good, waterproof splice.
    They also make them to terminate coax cable into two 18 gauge wires.

    #11 3 years ago
    Quoted from Billc479:

    The heat gun we used had a piece that would cradle the connector and circulate the hot air around the entire connector.

    I presume like the one in the YouTube video.

    #12 3 years ago

    What if you fluxed the wires before sticking them in the sleeve?

    #13 3 years ago
    Quoted from Wolfmarsh:

    Cool, do you mind if I ping you in a couple of weeks to see how you are getting along with it?
    I was going to upgrade one of the axis to 1800mm so I could cut a playfield and a cab. That means I don't need the wasteboard from them anyway.
    What kind of table are you setting yours up on? I was thinking I need to build one so I can level it, etc..

    Looking at building a lift table so that it can be lowered when I want to work on pinball stuff and then raised to do carving.

    I have looked into the 1800mm slides and don't know.about the distance. Some of the people on the forum are already stiffening up the 1000mm models.

    Im going to play with the 1000 for a bit until I get used to it before doing any upgrades.

    #14 3 years ago

    I just got the solder sleeves in and gave them a try. I was hopeful, but came away disappointed. I did my tests on the bench, but quickly realized that doing this in a pinball game environment would be a challenge. This is obviously not the product's fault, but doing a connection while working under the playfield would be difficult at best. One other issue I found was the solder takes a while to solidify and the joint has to be held stationary until that happens. Not too hard on the bench, but again more difficult in a pinball game.

    I tried 2 wires at 500 degrees and it worked fairly well, although there was some technique to getting a good joint. I presume this would be much easier if you had the proper heat gun as Billc479 mentioned. Not all of the solder melted, so I then tried another 2 wire connection at 650 degrees and got better results.

    Once I moved on to a three wire splice (I would presume the most common application for pinball mods) things didn't go quite as well. At 650 degrees I did not get good flow and after extensive heating I got a joint that looked OK, but when I cut off the rubber sleeve it in fact was a cold joint. Probably due to the long heating time, I also had a wire punch through the plastic (not a good thing since it could later create a short).

    I tried it again at 750 degrees and did get a decent joint, but still wasn't thrilled with the quality. I then added some flux and while I got much better flow and a better looking joint I would have preferred to add more solder, which obviously I couldn't.

    I invested about 1/2 an hour and would guess I probably could get the technique down for three wires, but I doubt if most people who are using these to avoid soldering are going to spend an hour practicing.

    #15 3 years ago

    I would think it would be hard to get the wires in a location where it would be possible to do a good joint. I am often barely able to get a soldering iron into a space to work without burning up a bunch of other wires, occasionally I still touch and slightly melt the insulation on surrounding wires.

    The only reason most of my wire splices work is that I am able to twist the wires together before I heat the joint so I don't need to support the wires at all during the soldering operation.

    Though, it would be nice to have a splicing operation that would have an insulating sheathing in place at the end of the soldering operation.

    #16 3 years ago

    soldering under a pf is harder than soldering on a PCB. I guess there is more room for error under the PF though.

    #17 3 years ago
    Quoted from barakandl:

    soldering under a pf is harder than soldering on a PCB. I guess there is more room for error under the PF though.

    I respectfully disagree. I find the pcb soldering much harder..and nerve racking.

    #18 3 years ago

    Here's a link to what we used way back when. http://www.te.com/usa-en/product-991965-000.html#pdp-docs-features

    We used the PR-25 adaper. Notice the temperature range of the heat gun is much higher than what has been tried.

    #19 3 years ago

    These are not great. I can't give them away, and I've really tried.

    They will work with perfectly clean, fresh wire if you heat it just right and use a little flux, but...

    I can't recommend them at all. Way too much opportunity for problems.

    #20 3 years ago
    Quoted from PIN_GROOM:

    These are not great. I can't give them away, and I've really tried.
    They will work with perfectly clean, fresh wire if you heat it just right and use a little flux, but...
    I can't recommend them at all. Way too much opportunity for problems.

    yeah, i thought it looked like a nice product, but i never tried it personally as i do not have any issues with soldering myself.

    Promoted items from the Pinside Marketplace
    $ 78.99
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    Lermods
    $ 12.99
    Eproms
    Matt's Basement Arcade
    From: $ 15.00
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    Meph's Mods
    $ 229.99
    $ 7,499.00
    Pinball Machine
    Operation Pinball
    $ 99.99
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    Lighted Pinball Mods
    $ 18.99
    Eproms
    Matt's Basement Arcade
    $ 65.00
    Cabinet - Armor And Blades
    Texas Pinball
    $ 79.95
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    pinballmod
    $ 89.99
    Lighting - Led
    Lighted Pinball Mods
    £ 49.00
    Lighting - Led
    PinballToys
    $ 29.99
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    Full Tilt Pinball LEDs
    $ 239.99
    Lighting - Led
    PinballBulbs
    $ 90.00
    Lighting - Under Cabinet
    Rock Custom Pinball
    $ 22.00
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    ModFather Pinball Mods
    $ 26.95
    $ 65.00
    Cabinet - Armor And Blades
    Texas Pinball
    £ 32.00
    $ 2.00
    Playfield - Decals
    Doc's Pinball Shop
    € 8.40
    $ 22.00
    Cabinet - Sound/Speakers
    ModFather Pinball Mods
    $ 30.00
    Playfield - Other
    Pin Monk
    $ 7,499.00
    Pinball Machine
    Gulf Coast Pinball, LLC
    From: $ 130.00

    Hey there! Got a moment?

    Great to see you're enjoying Pinside! Did you know Pinside is able to run thanks to donations from our visitors? Please donate to Pinside, support the site and get anext to your username to show for it! Donate to Pinside