(Topic ID: 188265)

NEW Bally / Stern Rectifier Boards and Kits AS-2518-18


By barakandl

2 years ago



Topic Stats

  • 16 posts
  • 12 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 1 year ago by Atari_Daze
  • Topic is favorited by 10 Pinsiders

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    #1 2 years ago

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    Price

    $ 50 (Firm)

    Price is firm


    for sale

    NEW Bally / Stern Rectifier Boards and Kits AS-2518-18

    Added: May 5th, 2017 Re-listed: 2 times Ended: February 11th, 2018
    Condition: New

    Item description

    Hi Pinside,

    I have made new replacement Rectifier Boards. Extra wide and thick traces. All connector pins have a bottom side trace connection. 35A bridge rectifiers. Good quality and properly rated fuse clips (unique clip set for the 20a fuse). Littlefuse or Bussman brand fuses. Molex brand headers. Available in three options. Fully assembled, as a DIY Kit with all the parts needed to assemble, or just the blank circuit board.

    Rectifier board gets hard soldered to the transformer wires, so remember that solder work is required even with the fully assembled option.

    Fully Assembled = $50
    DIY Kit = $30
    Blank PCB = $15

    Shipping $3

    Message me here or check them out on my website.
    http://nvram.weebly.com/new-pcbs.html

    Thanks
    Andrew


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    Columbus, OH, US


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    #2 2 years ago

    Nice to have the options . Great work as always..

    #3 2 years ago

    As many different options I see out there, I'm surprised by one thing.

    Why the hull doesn't anyone put LEDs on them, to show fuse or output power status? One version did, but only on one or two circuits.

    I'm not bashing Andrew or ths at all - I have his newer MPU replacement board (and will be getting a second!).. Just a general 'what the heck' comment.

    However, I'm impressed. Now you just need to get that SB-300 board, and we'll be set!

    #4 2 years ago

    Excellent work, Spit! Might have to have one of these for my S&S. You da man!

    #5 2 years ago
    Quoted from Coyote:

    As many different options I see out there, I'm surprised by one thing.
    Why the hull doesn't anyone put LEDs on them, to show fuse or output power status? One version did, but only on one or two circuits.

    Size and reliabilty.
    E.g. -- for the 230VDC you would need a resistor = (230 - 1.5) / 0.01 = 22K ohms... resistance would be no big deal. But the power dissipation would be (230 - 1.5) x 0.01 = 2.285W. A 5W resistor dissipating 2.285W would run hotter than hell. Then you have to factor in the tolerance on the 230V power to avoid burning the LED.
    The solenoid voltage is bad as well... but not quite as bad. The spikes on that line would probably kill an LED quickly.
    6.3VAC line -- you need to run the voltage through a rectifier and then add current limiting.
    The 6.3VDC line -- again, very noisy line. I wouldn't trust that one either.
    Only line that remains relatively stable and clean is the input to the 5V regulator --> the 12V line. That one is fairly safe for an LED for the long run.
    All these little extras - they don't add much parts cost but they do add assembly time (cost) and take up valuable space on an already tight board.

    #6 2 years ago

    WOW! Your rocking it now. What's next up your sleeves?

    #7 2 years ago

    Nice looking board. I almost want some.

    Quoted from Coyote:

    As many different options I see out there, I'm surprised by one thing.
    Why the hull doesn't anyone put LEDs on them, to show fuse or output power status? One version did, but only on one or two circuits. ...

    Quoted from G-P-E:

    Size and reliability.....

    Someone did, but didn't put a name on it so we have no idea who to blame.

    IMG_0540 (resized).JPG

    Some cryptic little numbers...

    IMG_0541 (resized).JPG

    #8 2 years ago

    Nice!

    Ok, looks like you did away with the test points at the top of the board & now have them on the face in various locations. That's cool, more room for the bridges up there.

    If I had not just rebuilt my Seawitch rectifier board I would have bought this instead.

    #9 2 years ago
    Quoted from balzofsteel:

    Nice looking board. I almost want some.

    Someone did, but didn't put a name on it so we have no idea who to blame.

    Some cryptic little numbers...

    Interesting - that's different from the one with LEDs that I saw. The one I saw (I'll have to see if I can dig up the image once I get home from my road trip..) had SMD LEDs.

    #10 2 years ago

    OMG!

    OK, the maker of that board with the LEDs raised HV resistor to 39K but you can still tell that one gets quite hot by how its mounted. Using a 39K resistor means they're dissipating just over 1W with that 1 or 2W carbon film resistor. Ohhhh, doggy!

    No rectifier on 6.3VAC. LED's typically have a reverse breakdown voltage at 5V. ouch!
    And no regulation on the 43V and switched lamps - two voltages that get lot of variances and spikes.
    And small, under board bridge rectifiers.
    No thanks! Stick to the board at top of post.

    Probably should have qualified my earlier statement: 'When designed PROPERLY', size and reliability become a factor.

    #11 2 years ago

    Instead of adding LEDs. I want to add an extra fuse on the DC side of the 43v for the cabinet / head solenoids.

    The playfield solenoids are all protected by a 1amp slow fuse. Its mounted right on the PF. The knocker and chime box have no extra fuses. When the knocker locks on it will burn up and damage the solenoid coil before a trace vaporizes on the driver board or finally the 5amp fuse blows on the rectifier board. The chime box solenoids suffer a similar fate.

    Ever notice how Q3 (knocker) circuit is roasted on a lot of bally driver boards and the knocker coil is burnt to a crisp in basically every project game?

    Andrew

    #12 2 years ago

    Thanks Andrew - I bought 2 of these (for Skateball and Paragon), and they're great!

    Hint to buyers: take the whole power supply out, transformer and all, and take it to your workbench or desk. The board swap is easy if you label the wires as you cut them off the old rectifier board. Also, make sure you rebuild and KEY the female connectors at the same time.

    #13 2 years ago
    Quoted from swampfire:

    Hint to buyers: take the whole power supply out, transformer and all, and take it to your workbench or desk.

    Great idea, thanks! I hate doing these but taking a little extra effort to just pull the transformer to a bench should make them less painful.

    3 weeks later
    #14 1 year ago

    rectifier boards back in stock.

    reminder for the kits. install the heat sink to BR1 and BR2 before soldering to the pcb.

    #15 1 year ago
    Quoted from G-P-E:

    Size and reliabilty.
    E.g. -- for the 230VDC you would need a resistor = (230 - 1.5) / 0.01 = 22K ohms... resistance would be no big deal. But the power dissipation would be (230 - 1.5) x 0.01 = 2.285W. A 5W resistor dissipating 2.285W would run hotter than hell. Then you have to factor in the tolerance on the 230V power to avoid burning the LED.
    The solenoid voltage is bad as well... but not quite as bad. The spikes on that line would probably kill an LED quickly.
    6.3VAC line -- you need to run the voltage through a rectifier and then add current limiting.
    The 6.3VDC line -- again, very noisy line. I wouldn't trust that one either.
    Only line that remains relatively stable and clean is the input to the 5V regulator --> the 12V line. That one is fairly safe for an LED for the long run.
    All these little extras - they don't add much parts cost but they do add assembly time (cost) and take up valuable space on an already tight board.

    Dammit, I have one of these LED type rectifiers in my F2K. There hasn't been enough game play on it to see any problems. I also have another in my spare parts and now afraid to use it. These were sold by Marco but no MFR name known. Would this hold true for the -54 board that also has status LED's? I can post a pic. Neither of these boards are available now and this could be why. Also I like how Andrew made the board with the side notches to mimick the original Bally.

    #16 1 year ago

    FYI, these are very nice kits, worth the investment IMO. Shipping was very fast and reasonable, I will definitely consider more of these should future projects need boards! Andrew answered my email questions very quickly and courteously, thanks again for all your help!!

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