(Topic ID: 288268)

Need to wire up a switch to work with a controlled lamp


By CaptainNeo

7 days ago



Topic Stats

  • 15 posts
  • 6 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 3 days ago by CaptainNeo
  • Topic is favorited by 1 Pinsider

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    #1 7 days ago

    Looking for some ideas on how to wire up a switch to work when a certain light comes on.

    I'm thinking of using a photocell aimed at the bulb, to trigger, but all the photocells I seem to have, either have more resistance as light is projected on it. or decrease, but not enough to become a completely closed circuit (stays 1000 ohms).

    So i'm looking for ideas on how to wire something like this to activate or deactivate due to the bulb coming on or off.

    #2 7 days ago
    Quoted from CaptainNeo:

    Looking for some ideas on how to wire up a switch to work when a certain light comes on.
    I'm thinking of using a photocell aimed at the bulb, to trigger, but all the photocells I seem to have, either have more resistance as light is projected on it. or decrease, but not enough to become a completely closed circuit (stays 1000 ohms).
    So i'm looking for ideas on how to wire something like this to activate or deactivate due to the bulb coming on or off.

    I did this with a photocell and an Arduino for an attract mode program triggering off the game over light. I'll have to look and see what photocell I used.

    #3 7 days ago

    What's wrong with just wiring to the power that lights the light you want to follow?

    #4 7 days ago

    IMO, the best approach is to use an optocoupler in parallel with the bulb. This is essentially the same as a lamp matrix location with two bulbs, only one of them is your optocoupler. The main issue, however, is that the output will be pulsed when the bulb is on due to the lamp matrix scanning. Your circuit downstream will have to be able to handle this.

    #5 7 days ago

    Is this still for the Sexy Girl project?

    #6 7 days ago
    Quoted from slochar:

    Is this still for the Sexy Girl project?

    it is. i have a projector that works great. I already know how to advance the pictures, but need to figure out how to make it come on with one of the features of the game. Once I figure this aspect up. The projector will be fully operational.

    #7 7 days ago
    Quoted from herg:

    IMO, the best approach is to use an optocoupler in parallel with the bulb. This is essentially the same as a lamp matrix location with two bulbs, only one of them is your optocoupler. The main issue, however, is that the output will be pulsed when the bulb is on due to the lamp matrix scanning. Your circuit downstream will have to be able to handle this.

    i'd like to know more.

    #8 7 days ago

    An optocoupler is basically an LED and a phototransistor in a single package. I like the LTV-817. It's more reliable than pointing a photocell at the bulb since both parts are designed to work together, they can't get out of alignment, ambient light doesn't affect it, etc. The LED side is a really small load on your lamp circuit.

    You need to select a resistor value that works well with the voltage that your lamp is running at. Something around 2.2k is good for an 18V circuit.

    The output side is a transistor that will be capable of a small amount of current. You mention in your PM that it's a power button, it depends on how the device works whether you can get by with directly connecting the optocoupler output to the button. With a lamp matrix, it's going to look like someone is pressing the button super fast any time the lamp is on. This is due to the lamp matrix scanning. You might need something like a timer circuit to turn this into either a held button or a single button press and release.

    #9 7 days ago

    yes, it's going to have to be setup for a single press and release, and the on/off button i'll be using will be off of the remote line. and single press and release when it goes off. Lamp matrix bulbs run on a 5-6v DC system.

    #10 7 days ago
    Quoted from CaptainNeo:

    Lamp matrix bulbs run on a 5-6v DC system.

    Ah, you did say Bally SS in your PM. That WOULD be 5-6V DC, but it's not a lamp matrix.

    Regarding a matrix, this is a very common misconception. For Williams, Stern, and most others, lamp matrix bulbs run on a pulsed 18V system that happens to average out pretty well to work with bulbs designed for constant 6.3V.

    It's mostly a moot point though, since the resistor allows a wide range of input voltages to work.

    The button presses definitely complicate it. I think you could probably find a timer that would give you one pulse when the lamp turns on (PWM starts), then another when it turns off (PWM stops). I'm not terribly familiar with those types of ICs, since I more commonly work with FPGAs or microcontrollers. You will likely still have issues with it getting out of sync, turning off when it should turn on and vice versa. Toggle buttons are a pain in the ass to automate.

    #11 7 days ago

    Check out a Bally lamp flasher or solenoid expander. Those used a M3011 opto coupler to do what you want. You could pick one up and modify it for your needs.

    #12 6 days ago

    This is the photocell I used:

    amazon.com link »

    But as BigAl said, a Bally aux. driver would work too.

    https://ksarcade.net/gp-as-2518-68.html

    #13 6 days ago
    Quoted from BigAl56:

    Check out a Bally lamp flasher or solenoid expander. Those used a M3011 opto coupler to do what you want. You could pick one up and modify it for your needs.

    interesting. What exactly does this board do?

    #14 3 days ago
    Quoted from CaptainNeo:

    interesting. What exactly does this board do?

    The aux board uses a controlled lamp to drive a relay or a triac. Either way it would do what you want, couple a controlled lamp to drive another. By integrating the moc 3011 coupler chip you can attach it to a controlled lamp scr.

    The aux boards are easy to come by. Either original or remakes. Or, it's a simple circuit you could make yourself.

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