(Topic ID: 263777)

Need help reading schematic & other Qs

By undrdog

4 years ago


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  • 16 posts
  • 9 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 4 years ago by DaveB8
  • Topic is favorited by 1 Pinsider

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#1 4 years ago

I’m trying to test whether a pop bumper lamp socket has the correct voltage. Lamps keep burning out (incandescent).

Even if incorrect voltage is not the problem, I still need help learning how to figure it out on my own.

I tried reading the schematic that has to do with lamps. Large complicated drawing, with lines at the right edge indicating those lines go to the playfield lamps.

I can’t see anywhere on there where it says whether the lamps are AC or DC. I’m guessing DC, like a flashlight, but where does it say that?

That became a question because I am trying to figure out how to set my Harbor Freight multimeter. How do I set the multimeter?

What is the correct voltage that I’m looking for? Where is that on the schematic, so I’ll know How to find it for the next problem?

Thanks for the help!

#2 4 years ago

What game are you working on?
Depends on wheather its a solid state game
SS games use DC for Controlled lamps
AC voltage for GI lights.
EM games use ac.

#3 4 years ago

They may not be burning out. Pop bumper bulbs take a beating. How long are they lasting? Just one pop bumper?

#4 4 years ago

Bally Mystic. Early SS.

Yes, same pop bumper. Probably don’t play the game more than half an hour a day. 45 min max. But I do enjoy getting the pop bumpers going. The pop bumpers are one of the things I love about this table.

Last lamp was replaced about two or three play sessions ago, and a few sessions before that.

The lamps are GI.

#5 4 years ago

Bally bumper lamps run at about 6.3v AC or DC depending on weather they are GI, (on all the time) or DC (when lit by the computer). Either way Bally bumper lamps are notorious for early failure. It's due to the vibrations of the game. Not much you can do about it.
Switching to LEDs might minimize the problem.

#6 4 years ago

guess the next question should be what bulbs # are you using?
44 or 47?

#7 4 years ago

The lower power ones.

#8 4 years ago

And they are black on top. Seems burned out, but I guess it could have happened from vibrations.

#9 4 years ago

I've got three machines, 2 EM and 1 early SS and replaced all pop bumper sockets during refurb and installed 'warm white' LED replacement lamps...haven't had a lick of trouble. You get brighter light and they won't brown those precious pop covers.

#10 4 years ago
Quoted from DaveB8:

I've got three machines, 2 EM and 1 early SS and replaced all pop bumper sockets during refurb and installed 'warm white' LED replacement lamps...haven't had a lick of trouble. You get brighter light and they won't brown those precious pop covers.

Great advice but working on pop bumpers may be pretty intimidating for someone who has little experience working on their pins. Maybe start with just replacing the bulb with an led first and see if it helps.

#11 4 years ago
Quoted from SUPERBEE:

Great advice but working on pop bumpers may be pretty intimidating for someone who has little experience working on their pins.

I can unsolder, unscrew things, put them back together and solder them back. I have new lamp sockets for the pop bumpers. (Didn't use them because bending the lamp socket in, just a touch, made for a much better connection. Solved that problem.) Now this one pop bumper keeps burning out lamps. Getting warm LEDs is a good idea, if they pretty much match the incandescents in the rest of the machine as they shine through the pop bumper cap.

BUT REALLY, I'm hoping that someone will answer my basic questions about reading the schematics and testing the voltage, so I can use it as a teaching moment, yanno?

#12 4 years ago

There's lots of Utube channels discussing how to read schematics, even specifically pinball schematics. Same with using a multimeter. If not sure of the voltage based on looking at the schematics, take a reading with AC and DC. Chances are only one will have a "real" reading, and the other will be very low or not repeatable.

#13 4 years ago

The Mystic schematics on IPDB are a little hard to read because the are paginated and the second half is smaller than the first so you can’t match them up. So the GI is shown here to be connected to A2J2 pins 1 and 5. A2 is the rectifier board which is attached to the transformer. If you look at schematic for the transformer you will see that pins 1 and 5 come directly off the transformer winding for 7.3 vac (after going through a fuse) which you can measure at Test Point 3 on the rectifier board. Therefore GI voltage is ac. The other windings go to full wave rectifiers and get changed to dc voltage so anything connected to those points you would measure dc voltage. Hope this helps a little. Learning to read schematics takes some time. The best way is to look at the drawings and when you think you know what it says, go to the game and verify your theory. Back and forth a few times and you will become more confident.

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#14 4 years ago

I like incandescent but relented to put LED's under the pops

I wonder if because the #47's have a lighter filiment than the #44's it makes em susceptible to burning out quicker due to vibration.

To help solve some of the mystery of where a particular wire may go (in this case the general illumination) I color coded the "A2J2-1 & A2J2-5) in a couple places .... hope it helps
bally mystic (resized).jpgbally mystic (resized).jpg

#15 4 years ago

chas10e TheWiz
Thank you so much. I’ll look at your images side by side with my schematics and see what's what.

#16 4 years ago

Cute pooch...otherhoo, doncha kno eh, all yah need is a few wrenches, a couple of screwdrivers, a soldering iron, proper replacement parts, and thorough analysis of the parts breakdown...a pic or two prior to diving in and disassembling, a UTube vid or two...and REBUILT! I'm a native Yooper, by the way, hence the early language -- -- DIVE IN, otherwise you're forever scared!

Quoted from SUPERBEE:

Great advice but working on pop bumpers may be pretty intimidating for someone who has little experience working on their pins. Maybe start with just replacing the bulb with an led first and see if it helps.

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