(Topic ID: 288684)

EM Bingo shutter motor cycles twice from ball gate

By undrdog

8 months ago


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  • 64 posts
  • 5 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 5 months ago by undrdog
  • Topic is favorited by 1 Pinsider

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There are 64 posts in this topic. You are on page 2 of 2.
#51 6 months ago

Wasn’t the relays, although I did clean up some messy soldering.

Was the A cam switch, which I’ve adjusted a few times before. Cannot figure out why it doesn’t stay adjusted. Maybe this time it will.

#52 6 months ago

if the switch stack is loose you'll have trouble. The screws are soft tho, so if you crank down too hard on them they will break.

if the switch blade is cracked or "overworked", it will slowly bend instead if springing back to where you adjust it to.

if the gap is too small when the switch is open, you can get intermittent arcing when it tries to open and that'll keep the motor going long enough to close the switch again.

if there's not enough blade tension down onto the cam, the stack doesn't fall all the way into the notch and the switch won't open enough. Too much blade tension is also a problem, tho less an issue on a cam driven switch since the motor has lots of torque ... unless the cam is clutch driven.

when the factory made the machine, they didn't have an army of switch adjuster gnomes tweaking everything. The wafers between the blades are sized so new straight blades with new contacts worked. Contact wear, wafers shrinking with age and some metal fatigue - especially on blades that are almost always held in a curved state - is where switch adjusting comes in to compensate for the wear-n-tear.

relays have their own issues. While there's a spring on the armature plate that helps pull the plate away from the coil top when the coil is unpowered, the moving switch blades also provide some lifting force. If you can't get enough blade travel to create a reasonable gap for an open switch, you usually have to bend moving blades to increase the distance the armature moves, then bend the stationary blades to make the switches work right.

you'll get used to it ... especially after messing with a gottlieb game as some of the gottlieb relays have smaller blade travel and the adjustment is more finicky.

generally speaking, if you can see a business card sized gap between the contacts when the switch is open, and the non-moving blade visibly gets shoved by the moving blade when the switch is closed, you're good for 90% of switches. There's some switch configurations where the non-moving blade will barely move ... if at all ... but you can typically see the moving blade stop after the contacts touch before other moving blades in the same stack are done.

#53 6 months ago
Quoted from baldtwit:

you'll get used to it ... especially after messing with a gottlieb game

Oh, great!
My next project is a Gottlieb.

#54 6 months ago

at least flipper fair doesn't have the decagon-style score reels and I don't think it has AG relays (you can't get parts for those anymore).

if you don't have a switch adjuster tool/kit, definitely get one when you order a rubber ring kit. Marco Specialties has a kit of 3 different adjuster shapes which is handy. A contact file for the high power tungsten contacts (flipper button switches, flipper coil EOS switches, etc.) is useful. A flexstone/plastone file is optional to clean switch contacts, but a contact file with a light touch works also unless the contacts are gold flashed.

if the two stepper units or the score reels aren't too sticky, it'll probably mostly work even after being turned off for years.

the main thing to watch/listen for when first running the game is solenoids sticking on (solenoids = coils with plungers). When those are held powered, smoke will eventually leak out. If that happens when you wandered off to top off your beverage, you may be needing your fire insurance

EM flippers are the exception since they almost always use high power to flip then switch to low power to hold the flipper up, so the plunger can be sucked into the coil indefinitely assuming the cutover to low power worked.

on most gottlieb's, the game won't completely reset until all score reels are zero, so the most common thing is ya plug it in, cycle it via the coin switch and the score motor stays running and no ball is ejected into the shooter lane.

how'd all this get into a bingo forum? I'm trying to avoid installing some flooring on some stairs ...

#55 6 months ago
Quoted from baldtwit:

how'd all this get into a bingo forum? I'm trying to avoid installing some flooring on some stairs ...

Thanks for the tips ! The motor does run until the score reels are reset, so de-gunking the reels will be job 1. The arms that actuate the flipper switches were “fixed” with large wrappings of electrical tape. Not sure what is actually supposed to be there, but it works.

But my first priority is doing some maintenance on Heat Wave. Check some gaps, degunk 0-9 reel which has started sticking. All ina day’s work.

Have fun doing the flooring. You can pay people to do that for you, yanno ?

#56 6 months ago
Quoted from undrdog:

The arms that actuate the flipper switches were “fixed” with large wrappings of electrical tape. Not sure what is actually supposed to be there, but it works.

nothing was there. The metal arms hit the metal switch blades, but the flipper button was plastic so no shock potential. 'course, if gottlieb was worried about shocks, why did they tend to put a 120V switch on a metal coin door with only piece of paper between it and a metal button?

if the flipper buttons got replaced with metal ones, then someone of a more nervous disposition (or a pacemaker) probably prefers some insulation someplace. Fish paper on the switch stack would eventually wear thru. A layer or two of heat shrink tube on the arm would take care of it if you ran out of black tape.

if I paid someone to do the remodel work, the wife may start wondering if why she puts up with me

#57 6 months ago
Quoted from baldtwit:

nothing was there.

If nothing should be there, the arm must be short or bent because this has a mighty wide roll of tape on it.

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#58 6 months ago

Multimeter says: its metal.

Metal flipper buttons that used to be red. Time to go get some tool dip.

#59 6 months ago

maybe the metal button was different length and messed up the position/travel of the arm, so they did that instead of bending or remounting the flipper switches or bending the arm.

#60 6 months ago

That's exactly what I was thinking. Original plastic button broke. Went with metal, which wouldn’t break. Needed more length and the insulation wouldn’t hurt.

#61 6 months ago

baldtwit
How's the stairs coming along?

I'd like to hook up the counter on Hi-Hand so I can track how many dimes it is taking me to get any good at playing the machine. Seems like it could be wired to the start relay.

Does that sound right to you?

#62 6 months ago

turns out you can spend hours planning then it's too late to do the actual work.

hooking the meter to the same two wires as the start relay coil should work fine.

#63 6 months ago
Quoted from baldtwit:

turns out you can spend hours planning then it's too late to do the actual work.

Smart thinking!

3 weeks later
#64 5 months ago

Turns out, the metal buttons were original, but I think they come in different lengths.

There are 64 posts in this topic. You are on page 2 of 2.

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