(Topic ID: 163692)

'76 Williams Space Mission EM pictures/information needed

By Otaku

5 years ago


Topic Heartbeat

Topic Stats

  • 21 posts
  • 6 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 5 years ago by Cyrus
  • No one calls this topic a favorite

You

Linked Games

Topic Gallery

View topic image gallery

5cpinside_(resized).png
13620698_10206615706899877_6700966883235131150_n_(resized).jpg
13600065_10206615707099882_828523090873413323_n_(resized).jpg
EM-1B-2001-86L_(resized).jpg
Screenshot_2116_(resized).png
image_(resized).jpg
image_(resized).jpg
image_(resized).jpg
image_(resized).jpg

#1 5 years ago

Hi all, I just bought this game as a project and it looks as if something smashed quite hard into the insides of the backbox, destroying one or two relays and half of the match/0-9 unit along with dislodging the board the 4 relays sit on.

I'm unsure of what those two relays do and the labels are gone on that side, so any help would be appreciated so I can locate new ones and find them on the schematic so I can wire them into this machine properly. Thanks!

Otaku

Pictures will be in the next post.

#2 5 years ago

image_(resized).jpg

image_(resized).jpg

image_(resized).jpg

image_(resized).jpg

#3 5 years ago

http://www.ipdb.org/showpic.pl?id=2253&picno=37040
I check my pictures to see if I have any others....

#4 5 years ago

Thanks Vic. I can barely make out "3rd" on the 3rd relay from the left, and two that were intact were labelled for first and second players. I find it odd that Williams used specific matching(?) relays for all four players for what I believe is scoring if I remember the label correctly when usually it's just done using a shared relay utilized through the player unit in the older games. Interesting.

#5 5 years ago

I think those may be latches for the 100,000 point lights. One for each player's light. Probably the safest way to keep those lights on without cooking a coil.

#6 5 years ago
Quoted from JoeNewberry:

I think those may be latches for the 100,000 point lights. One for each player's light. Probably the safest way to keep those lights on without cooking a coil.

Ahh, I never thought of that! D'oh! Thanks!

That's probably it. It's my first game with those lights (besides 1,000 point digit light-ups, but that's like 10 years older), that explains it.

I guess I got the good end of things, talk about two relays that are the least likely to be used out of any other on any machine... player 3 and 4 100,000 lights, quite the long chain of requirements needed to utilize those, funny. Still going to fix it soon of course, cool to know I can likely proceed without them (with them disconnected) though for the time being just for testing purposes. I assume they're probably universal with other Williams games?

Quick EDIT: I think the Player 4 one might have faired okay as well, just fell off the board. I'll have to look. Player 3 is completely obliterated and missing pieces. Could probably just make my own too with ease if I don't find matching ones, but matching would be nice.

-1
#7 5 years ago

Found it in the manual, hooray.

Screenshot_2116_(resized).png

#8 5 years ago

Ordered a NOS PCB for the side of the match unit that got broken. Cool! Nice and affordable (and no stupid $20 shipping/handling charge for a tiny item), thanks Bay Area Amusements.

EM-1B-2001-86L_(resized).jpg

#9 5 years ago

Here is a picture of one side of the art a little more clearly. Obviously not perfect but not so bad either, I've definitely seen much worse!

Play meter reads 71,889. I found some old pinball show ads (Pinball Wizards' Convention, now merged with Pinfest) from 2003 and no later so I'm guessing that's when the previous owner bought it for his home, obviously from a retailer as there's a bunch of documents of Pinball Resource stuff and other adverts. Guessing it was enjoyed for a while more then and then it looks like it definitely has been sitting for many years (2003 may seem recent in number form but not at all, and definitely not for me! I started Kindergarten that year), and probably got physically broken during that time unless that's what stopped them from playing it.

13600065_10206615707099882_828523090873413323_n_(resized).jpg

13620698_10206615706899877_6700966883235131150_n_(resized).jpg

#10 5 years ago

That's going to be a nice (low played) game after you clean it up and repair all the issues. It couldn't have found a better home. Nice addition to your collection. Keep on trucking!

#11 5 years ago

I love it when a plan comes together.

You indeed lucked out in those being some little used parts to have damaged. It's about like having the knocker or the coin door lockout relay get busted. Easy to work around for now.

I'd venture a guess that the standard Williams Game Over latch/trip relay would work as a replacement for the broken one, but only a little research could say for sure.

#12 5 years ago

I'm pretty familiar with that machine. Maybe I can help if you have questions.

#13 5 years ago

Thanks for the advice and well wishes everybody, means a lot!

Hope to get this going when I am back in New Jersey (in PA right now) in a few days. 71,889 plays isn't as high as some others I've seen but also certainly not very low either, whatever operator had it must have taken the right precautions with it and cared for it while it was out in the world making its money.

You see that a lot though, some machines with high plays on the counter with very little wear and destroyed games that have very few plays on the counter compared to some others. Condition truly is king.

Thanks a ton again, everybody!

#14 5 years ago

Hi Otaku SteveFury +
may I drop-in with a question - Steve, You write (post-12) "pretty familiar with Space Mission" --- my question I once wrote here: https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/my-never-ending-repair#post-3224895 (lower left corner) - a close-up picture is here: https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/what-does-an-alternator-unit-do#post-3203672
Steve, does YOUR Space Mission ALSO has this unit - and "what is this unit for" ? Greetings Rolf

#15 5 years ago
Quoted from rolf_martin_062:

Hi Otaku SteveFury +
may I drop-in with a question - Steve, You write (post-12) "pretty familiar with Space Mission" --- my question I once wrote here: https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/my-never-ending-repair#post-3224895 (lower left corner) - a close-up picture is here: https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/what-does-an-alternator-unit-do#post-3203672
Steve, does YOUR Space Mission ALSO has this unit - and "what is this unit for" ? Greetings Rolf

I tried Google and found:

"This is also present on the Alternator Unit on the main board, which switches a switch on and of with every fire of the coil."

Which makes me think it's related to that center counter possibly.

But I'm also reading it's to do with nickels, so it could count them up for 10 cents / 1 play.

There is also this in all manuals of Williams games from that era which mentions it.

5cpinside_(resized).png

#16 5 years ago

I think that was just a smaller version of the big alternator we were talking about in the Jubilee thread, Rolf. It converts two nickel pulses into a single dime. One thing that's interesting about it is that it looks near identical to the match unit assembly in the backbox of Space Mission, so if you needed parts to fix that you could probably rob them from the unneeded coin alternator in the body.

#17 5 years ago
Quoted from JoeNewberry:

I think that was just a smaller version of the big alternator we were talking about in the Jubilee thread, Rolf. It converts two nickel pulses into a single dime. One thing that's interesting about it is that it looks near identical to the match unit assembly in the backbox of Space Mission, so if you needed parts to fix that you could probably rob them from the unneeded coin alternator in the body.

Also something I didn't know. Oh well, for $12 (or even more if it was needed, but it wasn't) I'd definitely rather fix it the right way and leave the other unit intact. I don't think many were still taking nickels at the time, but I guess they had to include it just to be safe.

#18 5 years ago
Quoted from Otaku:

Also something I didn't know. Oh well, for $12 (or even more if it was needed, but it wasn't) I'd definitely rather fix it the right way and leave the other unit intact. I don't think many were still taking nickels at the time, but I guess they had to include it just to be safe.

I find that some games don't have an alternator, and some, like the one in the Jubilee thread, seem to have been jumped in after the game was already shipped. I have no way to know for sure, but I speculate that was a factory option. You could choose the coinage you expected to use on the game, and if you didn't think you'd be taking nickels they wouldn't bother with an alternator.

#19 5 years ago

Hi JoeNewberry
about "factory-option": In Europe many pins were in a pub or restaurant - only / just one pin. The pub-owners did not like the Bells / Chimes - they said to the contractor / operator: ONLY bring-in pins WITHOUT BELL / CHIME. So the operaters ordered from importer from factory: NO Bells / NO Chimes - and importer and operator saved some money as they got THESE pins a bit cheaper.

This is the reason why we pay in Europe for spare parts "chimes" (easy) 100 US-Dollars. Greetings Rolf

#20 5 years ago

An alternator is an electronic or mechanical means to facilitate 2 coins for 1 play.

On some older coin-op equipment the first of two coins land on a mechanical seesaw. The seesaw rotates/flips, directing the coin through an alternate path away from the credit switch and lands in the coin box.
The second coin resets the seesaw which directs the coin to strike the credit switch for a vend before dropping in the box.

On the Space Mission schematic, the first coin hits the credit switch and momentarily turns on a coil. It would cause a shaft to turn, closing an alternator switch. The second coin hits the coin switch and the coil pulls in again, and a vend is made through the alternator switch.

I don't recall seeing one in a Space Mission.
Strange that it is not listed as an option on the schematic.

#21 5 years ago

Once you get this game restored you will love it. Not deep or complex of course, but it's a really smooth flow (something I always liked in a Williams EM) and a just a great game to while some time away with and not have to worry about a (sometimes complicated) modern day rule set. I did go to non-ghosting and regular LED's and probably got too carried away with the blinking ones (!). I gave the PF a good waxing and it came out great, do this at least once a year despite the light play. While I do have several modern pins, I'll go back to this one a few times a week just for the fun of it.

Hey there! Got a moment?

Great to see you're enjoying Pinside! Did you know Pinside is able to run thanks to donations from our visitors? Please donate to Pinside, support the site and get anext to your username to show for it! Donate to Pinside