(Topic ID: 282116)

My mini homebrew -- updates and advice

By Nokoro

1 year ago


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  • Latest reply 3 months ago by Nokoro
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    There are 298 posts in this topic. You are on page 5 of 6.
    #201 8 months ago
    Quoted from Nokoro:

    I'm looking for some stand up targets for a few locations. Right now, I'm thinking about some for in front of the half circle plastic that forms my inner orbit. All I'm finding for the narrow ones are 1/2" x 1" targets like these:
    https://www.pinballlife.com/data-eastsegastern-12-x-1-small-rectangle-target-switch.html
    Anyone know if anyone makes anything smaller or if any game used smaller targets? 1 inch is a bit too tall for me, and I wouldn't mind a bit narrower than 1/2". I'm guessing not as all of these would be for regular size games, but I thought I would throw the question out there.
    I wonder if I'm better off trying to make my own by buying individual leaf switch leaves and spacers. It sounds like a lot of work, and I would rather not go down that route if not necessary.

    American Pinball made thinner ones for their games, not sure if they're sold anywhere though.

    For a few on mine, I just took existing circle targets and ground off the sides to make them narrower

    #202 8 months ago
    Quoted from zacaj:

    American Pinball made thinner ones for their games, not sure if they're sold anywhere though.
    For a few on mine, I just took existing circle targets and ground off the sides to make them narrower

    Thanks. I’ll check it out. And that’s not a bad idea.

    #203 8 months ago

    I’ve also dremeled off the sides of those slim ones fir my game, pretty easy. I’m sure you could just them down to 0.8 or 0.75” tall

    #204 8 months ago

    I could go with this and grind the top down, if I don’t mind light blue:

    https://store.american-pinball.com/products/3-8-x-1-light-blue-stand-up-target-front-mount-swif0010-11

    One of the issues is that I haven’t decided on a color scheme yet. When I do, I may be redoing a bunch of things.

    #205 8 months ago
    Quoted from Nokoro:

    I'm looking for some stand up targets for a few locations. Right now, I'm thinking about some for in front of the half circle plastic that forms my inner orbit. All I'm finding for the narrow ones are 1/2" x 1" targets like these:
    https://www.pinballlife.com/data-eastsegastern-12-x-1-small-rectangle-target-switch.html
    Anyone know if anyone makes anything smaller or if any game used smaller targets? 1 inch is a bit too tall for me, and I wouldn't mind a bit narrower than 1/2". I'm guessing not as all of these would be for regular size games, but I thought I would throw the question out there.
    I wonder if I'm better off trying to make my own by buying individual leaf switch leaves and spacers. It sounds like a lot of work, and I would rather not go down that route if not necessary.

    The target face is riveted on, could you remove it, keep the mechanical portion and 3D print a new target face?

    #206 8 months ago
    Quoted from Peruman:

    The target face is riveted on, could you remove it, keep the mechanical portion and 3D print a new target face?

    Thanks. I’m sure I could cobble something together if pressed. I was just hoping to find a preexisting solution.

    #207 8 months ago

    I attached the gates that guard the mini orbit this weekend. It took longer than expected to get the configuration right. It still needs some adjustment. Here is a game play video with the gates active. Right now, I just have them on a loop so I can test out how they perform. Eventually, they'll be controlled by the logic of the game. I also attach a separate, shorter video showing how the concept of the ball lock works.

    I'm not sure how well these gates will last / perform in the long term. A couple of times, one came partially off of the rod that it is clipped onto. I may have to think of a sturdier way to attach them.

    #208 8 months ago

    Wow that is so cool! It looks really good, the ramps are awesome! The gates are a really cool Idea. What kind of switches are you planning to put in for the locks? Opto switches?

    That makes me wanna build a Mini Pinball as well

    #209 8 months ago
    Quoted from stefanmader:

    Wow that is so cool! It looks really good, the ramps are awesome! The gates are a really cool Idea. What kind of switches are you planning to put in for the locks? Opto switches?
    That makes me wanna build a Mini Pinball as well

    Thanks very much.

    Not sure about the switches yet. I have a bunch of optical proximity sensors that I may try to use in a few places. I may also try optos or physical switches for certain things. That will be next phase.

    Next up is designing and testing the VUK to put in the empty space to the left of the mini orbit. The idea is for the VUK to deposit the ball on the return wireform on the left.

    #210 8 months ago

    I love vuks, looking forward to see that.

    #211 8 months ago

    Man that ball rockets around that mini orbit! Love it!

    #212 8 months ago
    Quoted from Mbecker:

    Man that ball rockets around that mini orbit! Love it!

    Yeah, I love it too. I wish it was a little more consistent, but it’s a cool shot.

    I printed a prototype of the VUK chute today. Got the dimensions a bit wrong, and the walls were too thin. Will try again tomorrow.

    #213 7 months ago
    Quoted from Nokoro:

    Thanks. I’ll check it out. And that’s not a bad idea.

    Nokoro - The thinner stand-up targets from American Pinball are available on our Web Store: https://store.american-pinball.com/search?q=Stand-up+target

    Best of luck with your homebrew!

    -Michael

    #214 7 months ago
    Quoted from Vegas9:

    Nokoro - The thinner stand-up targets from American Pinball are available on our Web Store: https://store.american-pinball.com/search?q=Stand-up+target
    Best of luck with your homebrew!
    -Michael

    Hey, thanks very much. By any chance do you know what the thickness is from the face of the target measuring back through the foam and metal backing?

    3 weeks later
    #215 7 months ago

    I printed a VUK guide and decided to try it out on an old board before I installed it. The first time I hooked it up, the ball went up and came back down without going out. I unscrewed the guide on top and then reinstalled, and this time the VUK worked, sending the ball out. I’m not sure what the difference was since I don’t think the positioning of the guide really changed, at least not much. This might suggest that the tolerances between working and not working are really narrow. I guess I’ll just try to install it on the pin and see what happens.

    AD6E00D8-7C72-4FC9-AEB3-D10DF767D658 (resized).jpeg

    #216 7 months ago

    Could the ball have to much room to bounce around?

    #217 7 months ago
    Quoted from stefanmader:

    Could the ball have to much room to bounce around?

    I don’t know. My main concern was whether the little solenoid would have enough power. The first time I tried, I tried about 10 different times, and it wouldn’t come out. Then, after adjusting or whatever I did, it came out consistently. So, the coil has enough power. Something was probably just a bit off. If it doesn’t work when I put it in the pin, I’ll start to play around with the dimensions.

    #218 7 months ago

    I installed the VUK today. The good news is that the ball does make it up and out. The bad news is that the ball falls into the orbit more often than falling onto the wireform. That's likely an easy fix -- just need to extend the bottom lip of the VUK chute. The other bad news may be more difficult to deal with. When I try to hand roll the ball into the VUK with some force (approximately what it would get from the flippers), it bounces out without falling into the hole. I may have to make a groove leading up to it to direct the ball into the hole. Or perhaps make the hole a bit bigger, but not too big that the ball doesn't land on the saucer underneath the playfield that the coil is centered under.

    Other issues: My ball gates around the mini-orbit are starting to get loose on the metal rods and are no longer so firmly snapped in place. I'm thinking printing those gates may not work long term. I may try to make the gates just out of the metal rod itself in a zig zag pattern.

    Also, I hate, hate, hate drilling and screwing stuff into this particle board that I'm using for the playfield. Using that was a mistake. I should have just used plywood from the get go. The screw holes get stripped way too easily with particle board. At some point, I'll move everything over to plywood. I just was hoping to figure out the full layout first.

    (By the way, ignore the color that I'm printing everything in. I haven't decided on a final color scheme. Right now, I'm just printing with whatever filament is already loaded in the printer.)

    IMG_1939 (resized).JPG
    IMG_1940 (resized).JPG

    #219 7 months ago

    If you've got any room behind the hole, extend the side walls back and make a little catching area. optimally it'd have an angled back/top wall to channel the horizontal ball movement to vertical and then let it fall into the hole (a bit hard to describe but hopefully you get the idea). Some deadening foam might help too. You might be able to a setup like Baywatch's center vuk where it has a little channel that bends off to the side behind the hole to give it space to slow the ball down without it just bouncing back through

    #220 7 months ago
    Quoted from zacaj:

    If you've got any room behind the hole, extend the side walls back and make a little catching area. optimally it'd have an angled back/top wall to channel the horizontal ball movement to vertical and then let it fall into the hole (a bit hard to describe but hopefully you get the idea). Some deadening foam might help too. You might be able to a setup like Baywatch's center vuk where it has a little channel that bends off to the side behind the hole to give it space to slow the ball down without it just bouncing back through

    I know what you’re talking about. I have something similar on the castle VUK on my WOZ, though it’s a groove in the wood. I’m not sure there’s enough room though for me to do that. Perhaps off to the right where there’s empty space. I’m not sure I could get the ball to curve around to the right though. I’ll give it some thought.

    #221 7 months ago
    Quoted from Nokoro:

    I know what you’re talking about. I have something similar on the castle VUK on my WOZ, though it’s a groove in the wood. I’m not sure there’s enough room though for me to do that. Perhaps off to the right where there’s empty space. I’m not sure I could get the ball to curve around to the right though. I’ll give it some thought.

    Yup, WoZ is another good example. You'd be surprised how tight a turn the ball can make, especially when your goal is to kill its momentum anyway

    #222 7 months ago
    Quoted from zacaj:

    Yup, WoZ is another good example. You'd be surprised how tight a turn the ball can make, especially when your goal is to kill its momentum anyway

    Yeah, it’s a good idea. Thanks for the suggestion. Will try to work something up.

    #223 7 months ago
    Quoted from zacaj:

    If you've got any room behind the hole, extend the side walls back and make a little catching area. optimally it'd have an angled back/top wall to channel the horizontal ball movement to vertical and then let it fall into the hole (a bit hard to describe but hopefully you get the idea). Some deadening foam might help too. You might be able to a setup like Baywatch's center vuk where it has a little channel that bends off to the side behind the hole to give it space to slow the ball down without it just bouncing back through

    that is a great idea! i was fighting with the same issue. My solution was putting a piece of foam there. it is about 1cm thick. it works, but i would rather do it like zacaj suggested.

    IMG_20210402_162653 (resized).jpg
    #224 7 months ago
    Quoted from Nokoro:

    Here's my first test of the flippers:

    20 Volts seems to be the magic number. The right flipper seems a bit weaker than the left, and I'm not entirely sure why. The left will work a bit more at lower voltages, while the right has trouble. And, the right seems a little weak when I hit the ball from the cradle position (i.e., when it has been held up, released, and then hit quickly again).
    The right has an older flipper coil labeled from Stern on it. It was in the kit I got and it seemed a bit old. The left has a brand new looking generic coil from Marco. It could also be a bad solder joint. I'm not sure. I want to get things set up a bit more, and then I'll really be able to tell. I'll take some videos of it hitting the ball when I do. Right now, the flippers hit the ball (which is .75" in diameter) fairly hard, and it easily thumps against the top of the cabinet. I expect it will go up ramps no problem.
    I've used Schottky diodes across the flipper coils. Not sure that was necessary, but since I'm PWMing the hold signal, I thought it couldn't hurt. Right now, I'm PWMing at 75/255. It seems plenty powerful and holds well at that level. That's assuming my code is actually working correctly. I think I'll try dropping it lower to see.

    Just catching up on your thread. Fun project to watch.

    What the solenoid needs to get it moving is current not voltage. Just an FYI...

    #225 7 months ago
    Quoted from stefanmader:

    that is a great idea! i was fighting with the same issue. My solution was putting a piece of foam there. it is about 1cm thick. it works, but i would rather do it like zacaj suggested.[quoted image]

    That’s another idea, and I may try that first. I’m not great at editing my CAD files once I design something. It seems I always mess something else up. It might be easier for me to add a 7-10 mm recess in the back to put a piece of foam there than to curve the ball around in a channel to the right. We’ll see what I can cobble together to try.

    I like all the ideas. Thanks for the help, everyone!

    Quoted from alexanr1:

    Just catching up on your thread. Fun project to watch.
    What the solenoid needs to get it moving is current not voltage. Just an FYI...

    Thanks. Yes, you are right. However, since the coil has a fixed resistance, I think the only thing I can play with is voltage to affect the current. Correct me if I’m wrong. I’m still learning. Regardless, the flippers are working, and I settled on 24 V for them eventually.

    #226 7 months ago

    You can try some simulations to see what the results are. (See link below). My concern is the power supply won’t hold up under load. In full size pins, the 50v controls all of the coils (roughly 10 on an average machine). With a multi ball game, you could have 5 to 7 firing at the same time. If you are using a single power supply for just the two mini flippers you might squeak by. Note, flipper coils are typically a double coil, one to power the flipper and then an end of stroke (EOS) that switches it to a weaker winding not requiring as much load to hold the flipper up.

    Have you tried to put a pinball on the table and see if they have descent power? If you did above, I will go back and take a look.

    Keep up the good work, the only way to learn is to do what you are doing and experiment.

    https://www.circuitlab.com/editor/#?id=7jn23rjw9vgb

    #227 7 months ago
    Quoted from alexanr1:

    You can try some simulations to see what the results are. (See link below). My concern is the power supply won’t hold up under load. In full size pins, the 50v controls all of the coils (roughly 10 on an average machine). With a multi ball game, you could have 5 to 7 firing at the same time. If you are using a single power supply for just the two mini flippers you might squeak by. Note, flipper coils are typically a double coil, one to power the flipper and then an end of stroke (EOS) that switches it to a weaker winding not requiring as much load to hold the flipper up.
    Have you tried to put a pinball on the table and see if they have descent power? If you did above, I will go back and take a look.
    Keep up the good work, the only way to learn is to do what you are doing and experiment.
    https://www.circuitlab.com/editor/#?id=7jn23rjw9vgb

    I’ve been testing it for a while now, and it holds up fine. There won’t be any more coils in the game except for the VUK. All coils are fairly small. The flipper coils don’t have a double winding. I’m PWM’ing the signal after the initial kick to keep the load down on hold. Eventually I’ll have some switches and LEDs along with the logic circuits, all running on 5V. I suppose if I have power issues in the future, I can get a larger power supply.

    #228 6 months ago
    Quoted from Nokoro:

    I’ve been testing it for a while now, and it holds up fine. There won’t be any more coils in the game except for the VUK. All coils are fairly small. The flipper coils don’t have a double winding. I’m PWM’ing the signal after the initial kick to keep the load down on hold. Eventually I’ll have some switches and LEDs along with the logic circuits, all running on 5V. I suppose if I have power issues in the future, I can get a larger power supply.

    You may just have to run separate power supplies if you want to keep the cost down. The only other option is to look for an old transformer on eBay from a scavenged pin. Probably the cheapest way to go. You would need to add a bridge rectifier and a large cap to get a smooth DC current from it. You might even find a used transformer with the power circuit with it.

    #229 6 months ago

    Thanks for all of the advice on the VUK. After some work, I got it to capture the ball and deliver it up onto the wire form. I extended the lower lip of the chute to prevent the ball from dropping into the orbit below. And, I created a pocket past the hole to try to kill some of the momentum and let the ball drop into the hole instead of just bouncing back. At first, this didn't work. I even put foam in the pocket, but the ball kept being rejected. Finally, I filed down the edges of the hole itself to make it a bit bigger and give it a beveled edge. Now the ball drops into the hole nicely every time.

    VUK1 (resized).JPG
    VUK2 (resized).JPG
    IMG_1943 (resized).jpg
    IMG_1944 (resized).jpg

    #231 6 months ago

    Thanks. I will admit that the VUK chute looks a little bit like a Frankenstein monster that I put together in pieces just to get it to work. One of the things I really admire about your homebrew is how well all of your 3D printed parts are integrated together to make a very cohesive looking playfield. I need to figure out how to do that.

    I want to tidy up the edges of the playfield first, make a proper shooter lane, figure out and tighten the outlanes, etc., then make everything more cohesive looking. At some point, I will transfer everything to a proper piece of plywood, as everything is starting to come loose on this particle board. And, then, I need to start thinking about switches, programming, more complete artwork, . . . .

    I'm not sure if I should figure out the switch locations on this version before I move to plywood. I'm thinking I should so that I can make sure I have room for everything first. If I don't, I may need to rethink some aspects of how everything is constructed.

    I wish I had a mini-rotisserie that the playfield was hooked up to, as there's a lot of disconnecting wires, taking the playfield out, holding it in my lap and screwing things into place on the underside. It gets tiring.

    #232 6 months ago

    Build skypilots rotisserie— it’s like $50 of parts and an hour or two to build. Makes homebrew dev life nice

    #233 6 months ago
    Quoted from Nokoro:

    Thanks. I will admit that the VUK chute looks a little bit like a Frankenstein monster that I put together in pieces just to get it to work. One of the things I really admire about your homebrew is how well all of your 3D printed parts are integrated together to make a very cohesive looking playfield. I need to figure out how to do that.
    I want to tidy up the edges of the playfield first, make a proper shooter lane, figure out and tighten the outlanes, etc., then make everything more cohesive looking. At some point, I will transfer everything to a proper piece of plywood, as everything is starting to come loose on this particle board. And, then, I need to start thinking about switches, programming, more complete artwork, . . . .
    I'm not sure if I should figure out the switch locations on this version before I move to plywood. I'm thinking I should so that I can make sure I have room for everything first. If I don't, I may need to rethink some aspects of how everything is constructed.
    I wish I had a mini-rotisserie that the playfield was hooked up to, as there's a lot of disconnecting wires, taking the playfield out, holding it in my lap and screwing things into place on the underside. It gets tiring.

    oh yes i totally know what you mean, taking out the playfield every day is not funny. i had it laying on 2 bar hockers so that i can work on it.
    and when you make changes or drilling holes when the playfield is in (for example a hole for the cables of the switches) i tried to cover the powersupplies and electronics, because that's where all the dust goes.

    and once you do grafics and the colors for the 3d printed parts it sure will look more cohesive! I'm looking forward to this, your build is really awesome!

    #234 6 months ago
    Quoted from Mbecker:

    Build skypilots rotisserie— it’s like $50 of parts and an hour or two to build. Makes homebrew dev life nice

    I would probably have to make a mini version. Not sure I want to do that just for this project. That said, I definitely need something that allows me better access while also being able to test the game from the top. Might have to cobble something together customized for this.

    #235 6 months ago

    I think next up for me is to do some 3D printing to redo the shooter lane and create more structure on the sides of the table near the lanes, optimizing the lane design while I’m at it. While things are printing, I want to clean up this rats nest. I bought some terminal blocks for power distribution, and I want to start organizing all the electronics so everything is a bit neater and easier to use, allowing for expansion as I start to add switches and lights down the road.

    One question I have is about fuses. Will they be necessary for a small project such as this one, only operating at 24V, with all logic and lights being at 5V? If so, where do you put the fuses? How do you figure out what type of fuse you need? I’ve tried some searching, but I can’t seem to find a clear answer, at least for a somewhat novice like me.

    23007ACF-58CC-4F31-B7FF-89C56BE55D1B (resized).jpeg

    #236 6 months ago

    Yup, fuses are still needed for 24v. They can save some 5V stuff too. At a minimum, you want a fuse on the output of everything that's generating voltages, so something on your 24V and something on your 5V. If you had a rectifier you'd want something on the other side of that too. Beyond that, some games will fuse each mechanism/coil, or just each driver board. Can't hurt to have more, other than that you have more complexity in the wiring, etc. You mostly just want to think about what can fail and short out. Any coil can short out. What happens then? Right now that short would run a ton of current through your driver FET, which would blow. If it blew 'closed' (eg, it shorted itself too), then now you have a short across your 24V line which is going to damage your 24V supply (unless it already has some internal safety mechanism or something). Having a 'line' fuse where the 110v from the wall enters your machine can't hurt either.

    For momentary coils, people often use slow blow fuses. The idea being, you don't really care what happens with the coil as long as it only happens for <100ms. The main failure point for a coil happens if it locks on for too long, so using a 2-3A slow blow on a coil usually works well. If you find your fuse is blowing during normal operation, just go to the next value up. For stuff like the 5V electronics I'd use a fast blow. Damage to electronics can happen instantly, and there aren't giant current jumps, it should be semi constant. I've saved a lot of electronics because my 5V fuse blew instantly when I shorted something. Even crossing the streams and putting the 24V on the 5V line might not damage anything if you've got some good fuses and overvoltage protection on the circuits themselves

    #237 6 months ago
    Quoted from zacaj:

    Yup, fuses are still needed for 24v. They can save some 5V stuff too. At a minimum, you want a fuse on the output of everything that's generating voltages, so something on your 24V and something on your 5V. If you had a rectifier you'd want something on the other side of that too. Beyond that, some games will fuse each mechanism/coil, or just each driver board. Can't hurt to have more, other than that you have more complexity in the wiring, etc. You mostly just want to think about what can fail and short out. Any coil can short out. What happens then? Right now that short would run a ton of current through your driver FET, which would blow. If it blew 'closed' (eg, it shorted itself too), then now you have a short across your 24V line which is going to damage your 24V supply (unless it already has some internal safety mechanism or something). Having a 'line' fuse where the 110v from the wall enters your machine can't hurt either.
    For momentary coils, people often use slow blow fuses. The idea being, you don't really care what happens with the coil as long as it only happens for <100ms. The main failure point for a coil happens if it locks on for too long, so using a 2-3A slow blow on a coil usually works well. If you find your fuse is blowing during normal operation, just go to the next value up. For stuff like the 5V electronics I'd use a fast blow. Damage to electronics can happen instantly, and there aren't giant current jumps, it should be semi constant. I've saved a lot of electronics because my 5V fuse blew instantly when I shorted something. Even crossing the streams and putting the 24V on the 5V line might not damage anything if you've got some good fuses and overvoltage protection on the circuits themselves

    Awesome information! Thanks!

    The 24V will solely power three coils. It will also go to a buck converter that steps it down to 5 V for the logic and lights. So, it sounds like I want a slow blow fuse downstream of the 24 V power supply before the coils and buck converter. Then, I want a fast blow fuse downstream of the buck converter before everything else. Is that right? What amperage on the fast blow?

    #238 6 months ago
    Quoted from Nokoro:

    Awesome information! Thanks!
    The 24V will solely power three coils. It will also go to a buck converter that steps it down to 5 V for the logic and lights. So, it sounds like I want a slow blow fuse downstream of the 24 V power supply before the coils and buck converter. Then, I want a fast blow fuse downstream of the buck converter before everything else. Is that right? What amperage on the fast blow?

    I'd probably put a fast blow between the 24 and the buck, and a slow blow between the 24 and the coils, and another fast blow after the buck. Amperage wise you just need to estimate what sort of draw you're expecting, it all depends on the electronics. Then round up to the next fuse size and give it a shot? I think I ended up with a 0.5A or a 1A powering my boards, and a separate 2A for my LEDs, etc

    #239 6 months ago
    Quoted from zacaj:

    I'd probably put a fast blow between the 24 and the buck, and a slow blow between the 24 and the coils, and another fast blow after the buck. Amperage wise you just need to estimate what sort of draw you're expecting, it all depends on the electronics. Then round up to the next fuse size and give it a shot? I think I ended up with a 0.5A or a 1A powering my boards, and a separate 2A for my LEDs, etc

    Based on what you said, this is what I’m thinking. Look right to you? (Obviously, I left out a lot. Just trying to show the position of the fuses.)

    1F467F08-9574-4E2E-BC0A-E311EFD24330 (resized).jpeg

    #240 6 months ago
    Quoted from Nokoro:

    Based on what you said, this is what I’m thinking. Look right to you? (Obviously, I left out a lot. Just trying to show the position of the fuses.)
    [quoted image]

    I'd probably put the initial 5A fast blow on the other side of the terminal strip, so that it only fuses the buck converter. There's not much use in having two fuses in series

    #241 6 months ago

    I’d put the fast blo on the other side of the 24v. As drawn the current would run thru the two fuses essentially in series so you have a fuse protecting a fuse.

    Lol edit— beat by 13 seconds, except we have different opinions on that fast blo placement

    #242 6 months ago

    So, this?

    44EE004F-B665-4216-9840-C56D9B431D5E (resized).jpeg

    #243 6 months ago

    I think you still want something between the buck step down and the 5v terminal strip. Not sure about the logic of having the 5A on the other side of the 24V, feels weird to me. If you have it there then the coils are still technically going through two fuses, just now one is on each side?

    #244 6 months ago

    I think the fast blo on the 5v was fine as you had it, don’t expect those loads to spike current draw too much when they come on. The other one, that is true.. perhaps better to fuse the source of the 24v, so fusing at the 120v side.. that is what I’m picturing. I’m not sure if what you drew as “24v” is the power supply or just a label for the 1-line?

    #245 6 months ago

    Ok. I get it about not having two fuses in series. That makes sense.

    As for fusing the 24 V supply on the 120 V side, I think the power supply has its own internal fuse, but I’ll check.

    Is there a need to have a fuse before the buck converter, if I have one immediately after? And, if I do, should they be the same amperage?

    In other words, I wonder if I just get rid of my 5 amp fast blow altogether and just use a 3 amp slow blow before the coils and a 3 amp fast blow after the buck before everything else? Or, if I should fuse before the buck, is there any logic to having it be a different amperage as the fuse that comes after?

    #246 6 months ago

    Actually, I think I’m seeing the logic behind all of this. Here is my new plan. I think this better protects everything. For instance, if due to a short, 24 V was introduced to the switches, this will blow the fuses before the logic and lights and hopefully prevent damage to them. My old setup wouldn’t do that, I don’t think. What do you guys think? Did I finally get it?

    779232D0-5DA1-42F0-AC6E-38DFF78BE796 (resized).jpeg

    #247 6 months ago

    That looks pretty good to me, besides from the question of whether your 24v has its own internal fuse to protect the house power

    #248 6 months ago
    Quoted from zacaj:

    That looks pretty good to me, besides from the question of whether your 24v has its own internal fuse to protect the house power

    Awesome. Thanks.

    The power supply says it has over voltage protection, so hopefully. It remains to be seen whether I have a large enough power supply once everything is hooked up. I may have to get a more powerful one.

    #249 6 months ago
    Quoted from Nokoro:

    Awesome. Thanks.
    The power supply says it has over voltage protection, so hopefully. It remains to be seen whether I have a large enough power supply once everything is hooked up. I may have to get a more powerful one.

    Over voltage is not the same as over current. Over voltage protection would either be protection of internal components from high voltage spikes on input or controlling output voltage — I’d assume the former as voltage output is usually ‘regulated’ +- a percentage, not ‘protected’.

    Over current protection is the fusing- if a supply had one I’d expect a resettable one. My supplies def. do not have them.

    #250 6 months ago
    Quoted from Mbecker:

    Over voltage is not the same as over current. Over voltage protection would either be protection of internal components from high voltage spikes on input or controlling output voltage — I’d assume the former as voltage output is usually ‘regulated’ +- a percentage, not ‘protected’.
    Over current protection is the fusing- if a supply had one I’d expect a resettable one. My supplies def. do not have them.

    Ah. Thanks for the clarity. It also says overload protection and short circuit protection. It’s basically a brick, like you would use to charge a laptop. It is not the rectangular metal box that are the more heavy duty switching power supplies.

    amazon.com link »

    If I needed a fuse between that and the wall, wouldn’t I need one on every device I own as well? I’m just a bit confused by the need for a fuse prior to the power supply since I have lots of devices with these types of adapters but no fuse on the house side.

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