(Topic ID: 114737)

My big concern - the play field LCD


By voodle

5 years ago



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  • 86 posts
  • 41 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 5 years ago by aeonblack
  • Topic is favorited by 1 Pinsider

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“Put the LCD in the back box?”

  • Yes 53 votes
    46%
  • No 43 votes
    38%
  • Not Sure 18 votes
    16%

(114 votes by 0 Pinsiders)

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-3
#1 5 years ago

Hi,

Straight to the point. I don't like the idea of a big LCD embedded in the play field. Full Throttle or Alien.

This is not a bash at Heighway's new pinballs. On the contrary I can't wait for them! These are constructive, thought out, logical reasons:

1 - It's far too big, and that means it's distracting. The ball will be constantly moving over animated graphics that change all the time.

2 - They will have to compromise on the graphics they display because of this. For example, imagine having full frame animation in front of you when you're trying to follow the ball. It's going to make it hard to see. You could argue that the animation will be over by the time the ball gets to that part of the play field. However, it's impossible to run a 3 second animation and say the ball will be clear of it, unless the ball is captured somewhere.

3 - Over time it's going to get dirty and hard to see unless it's constantly cleaned.

4 - The animations are a secondary part of a game. The ball is the game.

5 - On modern machines with a DMD in the back box you get to see important animations when the ball stops. ie. it's in a hole or held by a magnet. This is the time you look up to get the information.

6 - The score is important but you only glance at it now and then when you're not concentrating on the ball.

7 - A back box *needs* a LCD display so everyone can view it. Importantly it's used to attract people when the machine is not in use, otherwise it's a lifeless box.

8 - Most importantly, this lower area of the play field is where you need to concentrate to set the shot up. It needs to be distraction free.

And finally point 9. A big point:

9 - Heighway has the option to keep your cabinet and swap out the play field. It's a modular design. But, with a LCD in the play field you're going to have to pay for that with new each play field! With a LCD in the back box, you're only ever paying for one LCD. This keeps costs down for everyone.

I think these are 9 good points against the only 1 point that Heighway have with the LCD. That is, it's where your eyes are. I don't agree with this. Your eyes will follow the ball all over the play field.

I also don't think it's an innovation. I don't think it's a unique selling point. I think it goes against what the game actually is without it in the back box the machine is lifeless.

I'd be interested to hear other peoples thoughts.

#2 5 years ago

Reply to:
1. Big and distracting on the playfield is less of a problem than looking UP at an LCD or DMD, IMO
2. I somewhat agree with this
3. If your machine gets that dirty, well - that's a bigger problem.
4. Then you might need to go back to EMs or very early SS.
5,6 kind of the same thing you are saying in #1 really.
7. Disagree
8. You're still repeating yourself here.

Summary. An LCD in the playfield is an exiting way to merge new technology in games, not that this hasn't been suggested by others for some time. If done right, I think many will find they like it. If you don't, the option to have a standard playfield installed seems sensible. Otherwise, just don't buy it - plenty of other choices out there.

#3 5 years ago

prefer the display in back box.

#4 5 years ago

I think it is good to keep both options to create a little variety

#5 5 years ago

I think having an LCD in the playfield is very helpful in showing information to players. I've noticed that new players are often so focused on the game and playfield that they never look up to see the information displayed on the DMD/LCD. Having a screen in the playfield will improve the chances of catching a player's attention. It's a heck of a lot easier to see a playfield screen than to take your eyes off the playfield and look up at a backbox screen.

#6 5 years ago

I disagree that a well-done integrated screen can't work and even add a lot to the game. Nemo's playfield screen and the way it is integrated into the playfield art is fantastic, and Multimorphic's use of their ball tracking technology and on-screen targets is a completely new take and, to be honest, what people that are used to phone apps expect and will want to play. It's also what I want to play - heh.

Nemo:

Lexy Lightspeed Galaxy Girl:

#7 5 years ago

Not interested in LCD in the PF at all...but it might be cool. Nothing pumps me up aboot it though

#8 5 years ago
Quoted from Law:

I disagree that a well-done integrated screen can't work and even add a lot to the game. Nemo's playfield screen and the way it is integrated into the playfield art is fantastic, and Multimorphic's use of their ball tracking technology and on-screen targets is a completely new take and, to be honest, what people that are used to phone apps expect and will want to play. It's also what I want to play - heh.
Nemo:
» YouTube video
Lexy Lightspeed Galaxy Girl:
» YouTube video

100% agree, especially in regards to Lexy Lightspeed. It makes use of a part of the playfield that, really, hasn't been used much until this point. It is adding so much more gameplay and flexibility to a pin.

#9 5 years ago

A video monitor in the playfield takes up valuable real estate that could be used for drop targets, eject holes, vari-targets, motorized targets, etc.

The face of that monitor would eventually get scratched/cloudy over time from the ball rolling over it.

#10 5 years ago
Quoted from KenLayton:

The face of that monitor would eventually get scratched/cloudy over time from the ball rolling over it.

This could be easily solved with a replaceable window over it.

#11 5 years ago
Quoted from voodle:

Straight to the point. I don't like the idea of a big LCD embedded in the play field.

Straighter to the point-don't buy it.

#12 5 years ago
Quoted from KenLayton:

A video monitor in the playfield takes up valuable real estate that could be used for drop targets, eject holes, vari-targets, motorized targets, etc.
The face of that monitor would eventually get scratched/cloudy over time from the ball rolling over it.

On most machines, the part of the playfield where the monitor goes is usually just playfield artwork, so I don't think it's taking up valuable real estate; it's using a part of the playfield that is normally just dead space.

16
#13 5 years ago

Wtf is the matter with you people . When you're playing the game you're looking at the playfield. Scores, progression data, it all needs to be in the playfield. Having the monitor in the playfield prevents you from having to lose track of things and look at a backbox constantly.

We don't need cool animations in pinball. If they're on a backbox you miss them because you're not looking. If on a playfield they're distracting. The only time they should exist is if the ball is stopped. WoZ is a great example. While playing you don't notice anything that's going on the backbox. And when you stop to glance up there is so much there it's hard to focus on the right data before it's too late. You don't notice any of the animations until you're watching someone else play.

I can't see any good argument appearing here for moving the score / status display out of the playfield and into the backbox

#14 5 years ago
Quoted from aeonblack:

On most machines, the part of the playfield where the monitor goes is usually just playfield artwork, so I don't think it's taking up valuable real estate; it's using a part of the playfield that is normally just dead space.

+1
Few games have anything in this area. F-14 Tomcat has the target bank is almost dead center on the playfield. I could see a small monitor even working on that game, imagine something like a tablet sized display showing a real radar image that switches to an explosion when the targets are bashed. Cool as hell IMO. Snux could probably have put one in his Second Sortie Tomcat if he wanted to.

-1
#15 5 years ago
Quoted from KenLayton:

The face of that monitor would eventually get scratched/cloudy over time from the ball rolling over it.

The ball would not be rolling directly over the LCD surface, that would be silly. Perhaps you have never heard of games with plexi windows above lower playfields (i.e. Elektra, Krull, Haunted House.)

#16 5 years ago
Quoted from wayout440:

The ball would not be rolling directly over the LCD surface, that would be silly. Perhaps you have never heard of games with plexi windows above lower playfields (i.e. Elektra, Krull, Haunted House.)

On that point, in the above example of Lexi Lightspeed, does anyone know how is it tracking ball movement over the display if it isn't by touch?

#17 5 years ago
Quoted from aeonblack:

On that point, in the above example of Lexi Lightspeed, does anyone know how is it tracking ball movement over the display if it isn't by touch?

I believe there are optic sensors along both sides of the playfield.

#18 5 years ago

Nemo one is kind of cool. Lexi is just not my cup of tea and it wouldn't catch my interest.

#19 5 years ago

I hate the idea of giving up so much of the pf that could be better used. I am all for placing an LCD on the apron to show you your status though. The backbox would be good but I think lifting video from a movie is worse that photoshopped images in the playfield. Animation is great but movie clips seem so cheap... Hobbit and WOZ could have used the LCD better IMO for parts of the gameplay.

#20 5 years ago
Quoted from gweempose:

I believe there are optic sensors along both sides of the playfield.

Thanks for the info, I haven't had a chance to read too much into this game. But, I see no reason why there can't be a thin, easily replaceable sheet laid over top of the display if that is the case.

Quoted from Cappi:

I hate the idea of giving up so much of the pf that could be better used. I am all for placing an LCD on the apron to show you your status though. The backbox would be good but I think lifting video from a movie is worse that photoshopped images in the playfield. Animation is great but movie clips seem so cheap... Hobbit and WOZ could have used the LCD better IMO for parts of the gameplay.

What better use would you give to that lower middle section of the PF that wouldn't completely destroy the flow and playability of a game? F14 is an example previously mentioned, but even that one, the bank is above where a display would sit. Serious question, btw, I am having a hard time recalling any titles that really put stuff right smack dab in the middle of the lower pf that actually contain gameplay features (whether they are banks of bumpers or drops, popups, etc.).

#21 5 years ago

What about CFTBL owners who have installed the Pinball MikeD kit with a color flatscreen TV under the lagoon window in the playfield? The kit was meant as a replacement for a faded or discolored hologram, but many have installed it in place of a working hologram just because it looks cool and displays images all the time (while the original hologram only lights up after you locate the creature during multiball). I have an unfaded original hologram (plus a spare OEM hologram that I bought many years ago) but I still installed the MikeD mod this year. Creature was my first pin and I enjoyed the 3-D hologram for 20 years, but I'm enjoying the various 2-D images displayed on the TV by the kit now.

#22 5 years ago
Quoted from aeonblack:

100% agree, especially in regards to Lexy Lightspeed. It makes use of a part of the playfield that, really, hasn't been used much until this point. It is adding so much more gameplay and flexibility to a pin.

100% disagree (OK, maybe more like 80-90%). This layout takes away a lot more than it adds, with ZERO ball interactions on the entire central portion of the pf. If I want to play Hyperball with flippers, I'll buy a Hyperball and add flippers.

#23 5 years ago

if it's a la circus voltaire in the back then i have no problem with that.

but a big lcd on the pf, i not sure about it, guess i have to see it for myself.

#24 5 years ago
Quoted from aeonblack:

What better use would you give to that lower middle section of the PF that wouldn't completely destroy the flow and playability of a game? F14 is an example previously mentioned, but even that one, the bank is above where a display would sit. Serious question, btw, I am having a hard time recalling any titles that really put stuff right smack dab in the middle of the lower pf that actually contain gameplay features (whether they are banks of bumpers or drops, popups, etc.).

I would rather have nice artwork and indicators for status in the game. Looking to see if a light is lit is much faster than reading what is written on a screen. Something like Star Trek would be a good use of the space IMO showing what mission your on/selecting. Yea you can do that in an LCD but it seems like you would be installing it just to say you have an LCD when indicators could easily replace it.

#25 5 years ago
Quoted from StevenP:

100% disagree (OK, maybe more like 80-90%). This layout takes away a lot more than it adds, with ZERO ball interactions on the entire central portion of the pf. If I want to play Hyperball with flippers, I'll buy a Hyperball and add flippers.

Then clearly the game isn't for you. Not a big deal, not every game is going to appeal to everyone. I really don't think LL takes AWAY from gameplay, but we can disagree there.

I must say, though, I don't understand the aversion to a playfield display because it's taking away from existing physical gameplay...as though the lower central area of the playfield is actually used for anything besides playfield inserts on 95% of games out there. Hell, most of the games in the top 20 have massively open lower playfields.

#26 5 years ago

There was talk of a "mod" that would put a second display in the backglass. Apparently its an HDMI, which could be split easily.

I like the idea of a playfield display, it will definitely offer a different experience, but I would like to see a display spectators can see as well. If I have to split the hdmi and mod a monitor and mount it with my game I'll probably give it a shot.

#27 5 years ago
Quoted from Cappi:

I would rather have nice artwork and indicators for status in the game. Looking to see if a light is lit is much faster than reading what is written on a screen. Something like Star Trek would be a good use of the space IMO showing what mission your on/selecting. Yea you can do that in an LCD but it seems like you would be installing it just to say you have an LCD when indicators could easily replace it.

Star Trek is a good example of a game not designed around a playfield display, that's all. Of course it doesn't make sense to put in a display just to show what is already there with lights and inserts. If Star Trek was designed from the ground up as a game with a display in the playfield, then there probably wouldn't just be simple information displayed in the display, it would make use of the display in other interesting ways.

You can't compare an entirely new design to something existing and expect it to fit perfectly. Existing games were not designed with a pf display in mind, so of course it's going to seem pointless to put one in there.

#28 5 years ago
Quoted from aeonblack:

Hell, most of the games in the top 20 have massively open lower playfields.

I agree. I look at machines like AFM, Metallica, Spider-man, Iron Man, Medieval Madness, Monster Bash, Star Trek, etc, etc.... I'm sure there are exceptions, but for the most part the bottom 2/3 is, in fact, wide open, with maybe a ramp, stop lane, or an additional flipper on the right or left. There's a scoop here and there, but it doesn't seem like Stern is super into scoops lately either. It's different so some people aren't going to like it.

#29 5 years ago

I realize most people haven't seen a Heighway game in person yet, but the screen on Full Throttle just isn't a big deal as far as messing with gameplay. It's not like it's strobing constantly trying to distract you why you shoot.

My only complaint really is that I'd like to see them come up with a cooler way to integrate it into the playfield than a boring rounded rectangle. It feels just dumped in. If they masked it a little bit to make the shape feel more integrated, and built their graphics around that shape it would look a lot nicer IMHO.

I guess we'll see how they do it with Alien.

#30 5 years ago

One use I could see is if they could integrate that LP Screen to look and act like the motion detector that was used in both Alien and Aliens. You know, the one Ash designed and Ripley asked about that keys off of "Micro-changes in air density." Now that would be pretty cool.. Just watched Alien and Aliens this past weekend... Alien is my all time favorite SCI-FI movie. 1979, molecular acid for blood, Come on... Who thinks of that!!

#31 5 years ago

Having a screen for a playfield is an excellent advancement, and Multimorphic has done a great job with it on the P3:

1) They moved the main scoring window to right below the flippers, so your score is easily seen.
2) A video playfield allows for exactly the same quality of art you have been used to on a painted piece of wood, but in addition to that, you can have different artwork for any mode you play.
3) You can have MUCH clearer communication about what you need to shoot or what your mode progress is.
4) In Practice, the animations are not too distracting according to most of the people I have talked to who have played the game, and the Jackpot animations are really rad.
5) Like others have said, most pins barely have anything in the lower two thirds of the playfield. Multimorphic was able to float the flippers and slings over the playfield, You could totally design a game with other items floated over the playfield.
6) Redesigning the game around a large screen means rethinking a lot of things. The modularity of everything on the P3 is really kick ass. If your plexy playfield gets dirty, just slide it out and polish it, or replace it with a new one! (also, if you have a game on route and something breaks, have unskilled employees do a quick parts swap and let your skilled technicians go work on repairs back at their bench).
7) Adding a ball-sensing screen to pinball adds a whole world of new gameplay options.

In addition to all that, The P3 as a development platform for third party developers will be awesome for the hobby. When all you have to actually manufacture is an upper playfield module and whatever additional floating modules you design, that means that it is far easier for companies who kick ass at the creative design part of the business to actually ship. Sell your game (with your own magnetic side art and translite) to an established market of owners hungry for more games, or work out a deal with multimorphic to sell your game with a P3 cab to new owners interested in your awesome theme. Or hell, just get access to the open source frameworks and write new software packages for existing playfield layouts.

Pinball as a platform is an idea who's time has come. Replacing the painted wooden playfield with a screen is what facilitates that. I'm not saying that every pin moving forward needs to go this way, but I think it is an important piece of the future of the hobby.

#32 5 years ago
Quoted from Aurich:

I realize most people haven't seen a Heighway game in person yet, but the screen on Full Throttle just isn't a big deal as far as messing with gameplay. It's not like it's strobing constantly trying to distract you why you shoot.

It blends in with the playfield art so well, honestly - I forgot it was there most of the time. I kept looking up to see game information only to realize I shouldn't look up when playing a Heighway game! heh.

#33 5 years ago

Interesting discussion. Ultimately it's not up to us of course to decide what they do or don't do but it's nice to hear people's thoughts.

Let's just hope they can produce them in large numbers and have the financial backing!!

For example, 250 games at 3 pop-bumpers each is 750 parts, say 800 to be safe and carry some spares. Retail at Marco they're say $110. Heighway would have to be paying only $30 for the complete assembly, surely. So, there's $24,000 for just 3 components. Or a LCD screen that costs say $60, there's $15,000. It's not long before you start hitting the million dollar stock costs, or more! On top of that are the costs of electronic PCB manufacture, cables, custom components, machining of wood, cabinets, legs, power supplies, painting, silk screening/ink jet, warehouse, staff, insurance, electricity, cars/trucks, licencing rights etc. etc. It's a big and expensive job making this sort of stuff!

Sure, they'll have some pre-order money to sustain them for a while but it probably won't be enough. Hopefully they'll succeed and be around for a long time. I really want to see them be in the business for decades to come. In fact, the same goes for all manufacturers, big and small.

#34 5 years ago

I'm rooting for 2 displays ( one on playfield, one on backbox), believe there is already going to be a smaller one on the airlock, as well. I'm excited about this concept, especially on a sci fi/ horror theme.

I've never played a pin w screen on the playfield, but suspect it would work fine, being I'm staring at the playfield most of the time....should be an easier shift on the eyes.

Time will tell, but I'm excited as hell to get this thing and give it a workout......we shall see...mark

#35 5 years ago
Quoted from Rarehero:

It blends in with the playfield art so well, honestly - I forgot it was there most of the time. I kept looking up to see game information only to realize I shouldn't look up when playing a Heighway game! heh.

Greg....heard the game was just sick, speed wise...true? Sounds great for a widebody.....

#36 5 years ago
Quoted from Law:

I disagree that a well-done integrated screen can't work and even add a lot to the game. Nemo's playfield screen and the way it is integrated into the playfield art is fantastic, and Multimorphic's use of their ball tracking technology and on-screen targets is a completely new take and, to be honest, what people that are used to phone apps expect and will want to play. It's also what I want to play - heh.
Nemo:
» YouTube video
Lexy Lightspeed Galaxy Girl:
» YouTube video

I agree the Captain Nemo pin is the only exception. I love the look of that sucker. Can't blame other company's for trying something different but in the end I would prefer the backbox to allow for more playfield design and creativity used in game. Or why not all new games get a lower playfield and an LCD in the back box and we get more in the game.

12
#37 5 years ago

Very interesting topic and great to read everyone's opinions.

I made the decision to go for a playfield-located screen from the beginning because after decades of playing pinball, I understood that the player sees very little of a backbox-located display whilst the ball is in active play. The logical choice was to put the screen in the peripheral vision of the player, so the player never needs to take their attention away from the flippers or the ball.

In any of the shows we have taken Full Throttle too, we never had one comment from a player saying they found the screen to be distracting. We had many comments about people looking up 'expecting' to see a screen in the backbox, then realising their mistake. Most told us that this was simply a case of conditioning and of needing to adapt to a new display location.

With our programming, we set out to ensure that the display would 'not' be the centre of attention - which in our opinion should be the gameplay itself. The screen should operate in the background and should stand out if and when it needs to, but otherwise it should be there when the player wants it.

This is our approach.

#38 5 years ago
Quoted from voodle:

7 - A back box *needs* a LCD display so everyone can view it. Importantly it's used to attract people when the machine is not in use, otherwise it's a lifeless box.

Disagree with all your points except this one. I do actually think that having the LCD in the playfield is a much better place to put it for the player, but the problem is the attractiveness.

We're not in the EM era any more where a simple static artwork backbox would be enough to draw attention. Look around the world today, big flashy signs and branding is everywhere. Kids are being bombarded with marketing constantly on the internet, and so on and so on. The reason why WoZ still draws crowds of people standing to watch it is due to that huge screen in the back box.

In the UK the type of arcades I see now are full of redemption games, and coincidently all of the modern ones have either huge LCD displays or a ton of flashing lights all over them, it's almost an assault on the senses. Same with bandits and slot machines. This is where the Heighway games are going to flop on route unfortunately. Without that attention grabbing "thing" no one is going to walk up to it and sink coins.

#39 5 years ago
Quoted from PeteB:

Disagree with all your points except this one. I do actually think that having the LCD in the playfield is a much better place to put it for the player, but the problem is the attractiveness.
We're not in the EM era any more where a simple static artwork backbox would be enough to draw attention. Look around the world today, big flashy signs and branding is everywhere. Kids are being bombarded with marketing constantly on the internet, and so on and so on. The reason why WoZ still draws crowds of people standing to watch it is due to that huge screen in the back box.
In the UK the type of arcades I see now are full of redemption games, and coincidently all of the modern ones have either huge LCD displays or a ton of flashing lights all over them, it's almost an assault on the senses. Same with bandits and slot machines. This is where the Heighway games are going to flop on route unfortunately. Without that attention grabbing "thing" no one is going to walk up to it and sink coins.

No matter what pinball does change it will never bring in the high dollar amount of profit like those dump stupid boring lame ass redemption games with tickets for useless prizes.

#40 5 years ago
Quoted from aeonblack:

On most machines, the part of the playfield where the monitor goes is usually just playfield artwork, so I don't think it's taking up valuable real estate; it's using a part of the playfield that is normally just dead space.

Or a bunch of insert lights. Having an LCD there means you could have custom lights that change with whatever mode you are in. No longer would everything be set in stone once the playfield inserts are in and labelled. It opens up lots of possibilities that were previously not available.

Like the way it is done on Captain Nemo, you could have the display showing the part of the playfield art that is being "hidden" by the screen, and overlay whatever information you want, such as a score window or insert lights like I mentioned before.

#41 5 years ago

Night Moves - strange machine to bring up, but cocktail, with display in PF, and needs to be, you need to know what the mystery award will be to decide if you want to grab it, or trigger some switches to go to a point award. Depending where you are in the game, awards (double score, 2x/4x bonus, etc) weigh differently.

#42 5 years ago

Be careful what you wish for...We might find this when we open up our alien box..

night moves-582.jpg

#43 5 years ago

If there is going to be a LCD, which it appears as though it is, I hope they paint the wood that is visible around the edge of the glass. It looks unfinished.

Also, it's a rectangle.

It would be more interesting to have non-rectangular cut-outs in the wood, especially in Alien. It would then appear more integrated into the game. It could be one shape based on the theme, like a circle of the bike tyre, or perhaps two or three 'windows' that show the LCD. Something more organic for Alien. One windows could always have the score, while the other one or two display modes, animation or other necessary information.

I just think a rectangle is boring. It's a TV in a play field. I think it need to be more creative.

#44 5 years ago
Quoted from neurokinetik:

Or a bunch of insert lights. Having an LCD there means you could have custom lights that change with whatever mode you are in. No longer would everything be set in stone once the playfield inserts are in and labelled. It opens up lots of possibilities that were previously not available.
Like the way it is done on Captain Nemo, you could have the display showing the part of the playfield art that is being "hidden" by the screen, and overlay whatever information you want, such as a score window or insert lights like I mentioned before.

You could also use small OLEDs to accomplish this. We are already using them in our radio consoles for adaptable information buttons on our consoles.

art_lebedey_oled_custom.jpg
#45 5 years ago

I recently stood with about 20 others watching a very close 4 way playoff on a TZ, a handful were close enough to partially see the playfield but really everyone was watching the DMD.

#46 5 years ago
Quoted from Kevlar:

I recently stood with about 20 others watching a very close 4 way playoff on a TZ, a handful were close enough to partially see the playfield but really everyone was watching the DMD.

This happens in .037% of total games played.

Prefer the nemo to the lexy girl but I'm sure it would grow on me.

Since we are talking about heighway is there link to a vid with said game in question?

#47 5 years ago
Quoted from FatAussieBogan:

This happens in .037% of total games played.
Prefer the nemo to the lexy girl but I'm sure it would grow on me.
Since we are talking about heighway is there link to a vid with said game in question?

I made it 0.038 but did round up.

#48 5 years ago
Quoted from PeteB:

Disagree with all your points except this one. I do actually think that having the LCD in the playfield is a much better place to put it for the player, but the problem is the attractiveness.
We're not in the EM era any more where a simple static artwork backbox would be enough to draw attention. Look around the world today, big flashy signs and branding is everywhere. Kids are being bombarded with marketing constantly on the internet, and so on and so on. The reason why WoZ still draws crowds of people standing to watch it is due to that huge screen in the back box.
In the UK the type of arcades I see now are full of redemption games, and coincidently all of the modern ones have either huge LCD displays or a ton of flashing lights all over them, it's almost an assault on the senses. Same with bandits and slot machines. This is where the Heighway games are going to flop on route unfortunately. Without that attention grabbing "thing" no one is going to walk up to it and sink coins.

Quoted from Jackontherocks:

No matter what pinball does change it will never bring in the high dollar amount of profit like those dump stupid boring lame ass redemption games with tickets for useless prizes.

It will never bring in what JJP machines will do imo that's the problem. If Andrew had said we are just selling to home owners no problem. But he's pushed the operator angle bigtime.

#49 5 years ago
Quoted from RandomGuyOffCL:

Be careful what you wish for...We might find this when we open up our alien box..

night moves-582.jpg 68 KB

What the hell is that a picture of? They must have released that flyer super early in the production run, because that game looks nothing like night moves.

#50 5 years ago

When I am standing around watching someone else play a pinball machine, I'm not looking at the DMD watching seemingly random things happen, I am watching the player take their shots on the playfield. It is such a disconnect that these Backbox DMD and LCD animations are motivated by the ball, because without the context of seeing the ball do the thing that triggers the animation, you are essentially just watching a bunch of random animations on a screen. They may be nice, but are pretty useless to everyone in the backbox. The player needs the information on the screen to inform their playing, and the spectator needs so see the ball moving around to give context to what they are watching.

The exception is when I am acting as the player's eyeball surrogate, transmitting needed info to the them, but I think this further illustrates the bad design of having the display in the backbox. A single player should be able to have all of the info they need easily within their view without taking their eyes off the play-field.

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