(Topic ID: 130745)

My awesome $50 DIY rotisserie, or "RotEzel"


By goingincirclez

4 years ago



Topic Stats

  • 10 posts
  • 6 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 4 years ago by Chosen_S
  • Topic is favorited by 21 Pinsiders

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    10
    #1 4 years ago

    OK, giving credit where due first: I know rotisseries are nothing new, as several designs have been devised and shared on Pinside and elsewhere over the years. I saw Vid’s post on the classic pipe design first… then Ed Cheung’s take… and some wall-mount versions… table-mount versions... and others...

    But I think what I amalgamated out of all those with my own take is worth sharing, so here goes!

    For my purposes, I ruled out the pipe version because, though I admire its functional simplicity, I don’t like the big heavy square frame on the floor. My workspace is compact in a high-traffic household area so I didn’t want a tripping hazard. Nor did I want an annoying pipe underfoot as I worked. So as I considered a more freestanding design, I realized that I could attach caddies and hang tools onto wood beams more easily than metal pipes… that could be handy. The rest of the versatility was “happy accident” but could be easily be modified or built with intent!

    COST

    My total cost for the rotisserie was $50 for hardware bits because I happened to have proper wood in a scrap pile - if you don’t, budget another $20 or so for a 10-foot deck post and a 2x4. You should also budget for clamps if you don’t have any, but those can amortize into general workshop supplies. So even going all-out you’re still at the magic $100-or-less threshold for the materials, though you also need access to a miter saw or jig to cut the post.

    When I built it I didn’t have a how-to in mind… but as I’ve used it, its enhanced versatility has surprised and delighted me... so I decided to share, but you’ll have to excuse the lousy pics since it’s being used in an unfinished basement, not a photo studio.

    Anyway, onto the design:

    RotEnd.jpg

    I essentially built two large wooden tees, out of 4x4 post. The base is 24” long and the vertical is 36” long. By cutting the post with careful square cuts, the pieces butt together tight and square. I used strap braces and #8 lag screws to secure them together, on both sides of the joint. They will NOT twist or come apart!

    postbracket.jpg

    Some familiar 1" pipe components make up the balance: (4) flanges, (4) short nipples, (2) unions, and (1) perforated angle brace (a 36" cut it in half) are attached to the top of the inverted tees. I used the same #8 lag screws to mount the flanges to the posts.

    MagBin.jpg

    The playfield is simply spanned and clamped in place between the tees like a standard rotisserie. I tried it with just the tees and it was sturdy enough thanks to the large flat footprints of the bases, but the entire rig is strengthened considerably with the cross-brace of a 2x4: that's cheap insurance. As for attaching that 2x4 (a scrap 2x6 in my case), a friend happened to come by and wanted to demonstrate a drawbore joint, so we went ahead and did that… but you could screw a board in place as a span brace all the same. Easy!

    So what's the big deal? Well, the real beauty of this design comes from using wood! Each completed wooden tee is its own sturdy, freestanding subassembly. It’s no more difficult or unsightly to store than a bunch of random pipe sections. It’s quicker set up, move, and break down. It also keeps the floor beneath and around the perimeter open. But wait, there’s more….!

    Got a non-standard pf to deal with? Get a shorter 2x4 span brace if need be. Easy!

    Think you might need to move it around on occasion, in progress? You can securely attach locking casters to the bases, and roll your entire project out of the way or where needed. Easy AND awesome (try doing THAT with pipe)!

    Got some frequent go-to items like a dremel, heat gun, or soldering item? Put some screws in the posts and hang them within reach. Heck, mount a power strip while you’re at it! Maybe some hooks for hanging rags. The tops of the posts offer a handy surface for setting down solvent bottles and the like… or to mount a magnetic holder. Easy!

    Hangers.jpg

    On the cross-brace, you can attach shelving and brackets for holding tools and supplies too - as demonstrated by the happy accident of a stored spare, folded bench from my Ford Aerostar pin-hauler perfectly fitting and filling this purpose. If I didn’t have that bench, a simple L-girder shelf would have been easy to make.

    Now, owing to that happenstance bench clearance, and the large piece of scrap I used, you might note I notched the span brace to clear a rotating playfield. But you probably won’t have that concern, so if you size and place your span brace low enough, you can easily mount a 48” flourescent tube lamp for checking inserts and decals!

    It'd be pretty slick looking if I mounted a tube in that notch...

    Did I mention the assembled height of all this has happens to be *perfect*? You can easily tailor and cut wood to suit your own whims - the end result when seated in a comfy rolling chair, the “bench table” beneath the rotisserie is at a perfect height for supplies. And rotating the playfield turns it into an easel of sorts, for easy cleaning, touch-ups, insert work, etc. Say nothing of when it comes time to work on the underside!

    Station.jpg

    So there you have it. Simple and nothing too earth-shattering, but I’m so thrilled with how this has all worked out, and could yet be further enhanced and personalized, that I had to share. I don’t think the pipe versions are this versatile, so for roughly the same price (or less) it might be worth considering.

    Room.jpg

    Just wanted to give back to a community that has and continues to help me immensely…

    Underside.jpg

    #2 4 years ago

    I want to see more pics of those sand weights! Way to stay vintage dude!

    Nice stand though, well done.

    #3 4 years ago

    I like the fact that it holds a car seat for when you need to take a break.

    #4 4 years ago

    I like it. The last time I went to price out the metal pipe version my Home Depot didn't have half the parts I needed. This seems like something I could have built in an afternoon.

    #5 4 years ago
    Quoted from centerflank:

    Way to stay vintage dude

    Goodwill, my friend. I was a hipster before it was cool.

    Actually, those weights, for being cheap secondhand, are awesome. Between those, a decent new bike, and a change in diet, I lost ~70 lbs in a year and leveled off at "non-overwieght" for the first time in my life! Maintained it for 3 years now, but some has crept back. Gotta fix that.

    Quoted from SealClubber:

    I like the fact that it holds a car seat for when you need to take a break.

    A total, complete, unplanned Incidente Del Supercollawesome. I literally brought the tees down, mounted the pf, admired how it fit, and then when looking to prepare and optimize the workspace, realized the bench just fit like a glove! IT WAS MEANT TO BE

    Quoted from JoeNewberry:

    This seems like something I could have built in an afternoon.

    Not even that! It took me less than 2 hours, not counting the drawbore experiment.

    I know what you mean about finding the supplies, though. I had the same experience: went through all the store working my way from one end to the other, only to discover AT THE VERY END that the only posts they had, were treated. Ugh. At the time I'd forgotten I had one at home, so for once I snagged victory from defeat!

    1 month later
    #6 4 years ago

    As I was finally blessed with a rare window of good weather suitable for clearcoating, here's a bump-date to share another cool thing about this design that I didn't really consider when I first built it: it moves upstairs and outside really easily! Each end is maybe 15 pounds or so and fits through a doorway. You can carry one or both at a time and not have to assemble anything. Pop the crossmember in and done. Total time was less than 5 minutes.

    Also, even without casters, and the playfield on, it's easy to pick up and move: grab the pipe unions as handles and carefully move if/as needed.... say back inside for the clear to safely fully cure once the hazmat cloud has dissipated.

    I've also since mounted a track for some removable bins to that crossmember... they will be handy as I work on the bottom of the pf.

    I guess I'm just amazed at how well this thing has worked out, and how much more versatile, flexible, and portable it's been than the iron-pipe version appeared to be. Of course, that's just me so I'm not knocking the pipe version... but if anyone's still on the fence, you might consider this one.

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    #7 4 years ago

    How do you keep the playfield from spinning?

    Cool build!

    #8 4 years ago

    Nice build but when you clear the pf outside how do you keep bugs and other air born junk out of the clear when you shoot it. Or isn't it a problem.

    #9 4 years ago

    The pipe unions can be hand tightened and do a great job keeping it secure... and are easily loosened when spinning is needed.

    Fallout and contaminants were indeed a concern. I have a lot of constraints, and with this awful weather I finally claimed my now-or-never moment. I used the pop-canopy to provide shade and shelter from overhead elements. I thought about enclosing it with plastic or wire mesh to keep bugs away, but as it happens, in the heat of the midday with almost no wind, and grass mowed the night before... there was little to no fallout to contend with. I got lucky. The clear cured "dry" very quickly between coats, and when the final coat was set to cure I moved it back indoors. Obviously this is still not ideal for a true showroom / CQ / professional job. But I am learning what I can and making the best of my situation and environment. Whatever nitpick minor imperfections may be in the final result (I still have to sand / polish / finish / etc yet) the game was trashed unplayable when I got it, so it's being saved at any rate.

    #10 4 years ago

    Done...

    A few little changes, will be rotating the clamps to the side to allow for rotating

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