(Topic ID: 182126)

Most crucial parts of flipper rebuild


By Otaku

2 years ago



Topic Stats

  • 29 posts
  • 17 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 2 years ago by dasvis
  • Topic is favorited by 3 Pinsiders

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    #1 2 years ago

    What would you say are the most crucial parts of a flipper rebuild? With a complete kit being something like $36 per game, it quickly gets very expensive (at least for me) to buy kits for the multiple games that need them. Is there any parts that wear the most that should be replaced above others? I suppose correctly aligned EOS switches are important as well.

    #2 2 years ago
    Quoted from Otaku:

    What would you say are the most crucial parts of a flipper rebuild? With a complete kit being something like $36 per game, it quickly gets very expensive (at least for me) to buy kits for the multiple games that need them. Is there any parts that wear the most that should be replaced above others? I suppose correctly aligned EOS switches are important as well.

    Don't buy the kits, buy the parts separately. Saves lots of money. Everything is important but if you only want to do the most "important" parts, I would say the spring, the coil tubing and the coil stop. You can clean the contacts on the EOS switches with a business card or some rubbing alcohol.

    #3 2 years ago

    Plunger, link, spring, coil stop, coil sleeve, EOS switch, flipper shaft, flipper bat, bushing. Also, don't forget the cabinet switches

    The flippers are the most important part of the game, and really should be in thr best shape possible.

    The kits generally include a lot of extra parts you might not necessarily use such as various screws or even an Allen key, if applicable.

    You can save a few bucks by building your own kit only the parts you need.

    #4 2 years ago

    Link, sleeve, and bushing for me. The plastic parts.

    #5 2 years ago

    EOS if high power. Nylon bushing the flipper shaft rides in. Plunger assembly. Coil Stop. Coil Sleeve.

    LTG : )

    #6 2 years ago

    Crazy as it sounds I've started to replace the other coil stop as well . This is the one on the other side of the coil. On holder games like pinbot etc I've seen this stops hole get slightly oblong instead of round. This causes the coil to be off center ever so slightly causing drag.

    #7 2 years ago
    Quoted from KornFreak28:

    Don't buy the kits, buy the parts separately. Saves lots of money. Everything is important but if you only want to do the most "important" parts, I would say the spring, the coil tubing and the coil stop. You can clean the contacts on the EOS switches with a business card or some rubbing alcohol.

    You can't clean EM contacts with a business card.

    #8 2 years ago

    Plunger, link, stop are the ones that really wear. Switches usually are fine unless they snap a blade (takes a lot to wear the contacts). Sleeves are good to replace simply because 'why not'

    It's the plunger action that takes the abuse.

    #9 2 years ago

    Usually, I'll replace the coil sleeve, link/plunger and then clean and adjust the eos and flipper button switches. This is usually good enough if nothing else is busted. If noise bugs you, get the coil stops also. I've never broken a bushing, but have purchased games with them. It might be a good idea to keep a couple of these in stock..

    Slightly off topic, but I usually rebuild the pops too.

    #10 2 years ago
    Quoted from EMsInKC:

    You can't clean EM contacts with a business card.

    The EOS switch contacts? I have done it. Yes you can. Place the business card between the contacts, squeeze them together, pull business card out.

    Just saying that crud does get cleaned up with a business card, no need to have a huge debate over this. Everybody has a different way of doing this. Alcohol with a Q-tip works too

    #11 2 years ago
    Quoted from KornFreak28:

    The EOS switch contacts? I have done it. Yes you can. Place the business card between the contacts, squeeze them together, pull business card out.
    Just saying that crud does get cleaned up with a business card, no need to have a huge debate over this. Everybody has a different way of doing this. Alcohol with a Q-tip works too

    Agree.
    A good paper business card is essential for EM contact cleaning.
    Just don't use the newer style waxy ones.

    #12 2 years ago
    Quoted from Arcade:

    Agree.
    A good paper business card is essential for EM contact cleaning.
    Just don't use the newer style waxy ones.

    I've always just used the brown paper bag cut in strips and folded up a few times.

    #13 2 years ago
    Quoted from Arcade:

    Agree.
    A good paper business card is essential for EM contact cleaning.
    Just don't use the newer style waxy ones.

    Thank you sir!

    #14 2 years ago

    What the hell ems do you guys own? Mine have trouble being cleaned with sandpaper even. Business cards only ever work for low voltage contacts for me, and often not even then. *glares at old bally ss games*

    #15 2 years ago
    Quoted from zacaj:

    What the hell ems do you guys own? Mine have trouble being cleaned with sandpaper even. Business cards only ever work for low voltage contacts for me, and often not even then. *glares at old bally ss games*

    Ive had to use a point file from time to time also. Just saying most of the time it wasn't needed.

    #16 2 years ago
    Quoted from zacaj:

    What the hell ems do you guys own? Mine have trouble being cleaned with sandpaper even. Business cards only ever work for low voltage contacts for me, and often not even then. *glares at old bally ss games*

    I have owned over 40 EM's.
    Business cards just work.
    For really dirty contacts I use a little rubbing alcohol on them.

    #17 2 years ago
    Quoted from KornFreak28:

    The EOS switch contacts? I have done it. Yes you can. Place the business card between the contacts, squeeze them together, pull business card out.
    Just saying that crud does get cleaned up with a business card, no need to have a huge debate over this. Everybody has a different way of doing this. Alcohol with a Q-tip works too

    He was trying to point out high voltage verse low voltage switch contacts. (But didn't say it...)

    High voltage contacts you use flex stones to clean. Low voltage contacts you wipe. Low voltage... the flex stone would strip its coating off and ruin the contact. The tungsten contacts used in high voltage flipper switches in EMs you use a file on.

    #18 2 years ago

    Consider yourself lucky you don't have a bunch of linear flipper Bally those kits are like 76$.

    #19 2 years ago
    Quoted from flynnibus:

    He was trying to point out high voltage verse low voltage switch contacts. (But didn't say it...)
    High voltage contacts you use flex stones to clean. Low voltage contacts you wipe. Low voltage... the flex stone would strip its coating off and ruin the contact. The tungsten contacts used in high voltage flipper switches in EMs you use a file on.

    I just learned something new, Thanks flynnibus!

    #20 2 years ago
    Quoted from CNKay:

    Consider yourself lucky you don't have a bunch of linear flipper Bally those kits are like 76$.

    Check pinball life. They just started selling these for a reasonable price

    #21 2 years ago
    Quoted from brenna98:

    Check pinball life. They just started selling these for a reasonable price

    No kit for Bally listed earlier than 5/1980......

    #22 2 years ago
    Quoted from dasvis:

    No kit for Bally listed earlier than 5/1980......

    These are the linear flipper kits...
    http://www.pinballlife.com/index.php?p=product&id=4101

    I've just changed mine to linkages instead. More responsive and more common parts.

    Edit: I guess you are saying about the date range. Made me think, not sure what varies in the linkages there... it's probably just the different switch types.

    #23 2 years ago

    edit- sorry posted this in the wrong thread

    #24 2 years ago
    Quoted from flynnibus:

    He was trying to point out high voltage verse low voltage switch contacts. (But didn't say it...)
    High voltage contacts you use flex stones to clean. Low voltage contacts you wipe. Low voltage... the flex stone would strip its coating off and ruin the contact. The tungsten contacts used in high voltage flipper switches in EMs you use a file on.

    Flex Stone ruins contacts? Whoops, I've been lightly using them on badly fouled contacts. So on all of your AG and AS relays just paper with alcohol? (Not sandpaper)

    #25 2 years ago

    First thing I do to all my new games is rebuild the flippers because tyou know exactly where you stand with the playability of the game. Plungers, links, sleeves, springs, bushings, stops and EOS. If the coil lugs are mangled, new coils, too. This makes sure there's a good electrical path to the windings.

    Yes, it can get expensive but it's a small price to pay. There's a reason all my pin friends love to play my games and buy them when I'm done.

    #26 2 years ago

    Silver contacts (lower voltage) can be cleaned with a flexstone or 400 grit sandpaper. But high voltage tungsten, which is EOS/Flipper button contacts, require a metal file. You simply can't clean them with a business card or alcohol, and you really won't get low voltage contacts cleaned with those either. A brush on a Dremel tool will work also.

    Now, you can clean SS games with a business card. You don't want to use any of the above on those. But EM games are a different animal

    #27 2 years ago
    Quoted from Playdium:

    Flex Stone ruins contacts? Whoops, I've been lightly using them on badly fouled contacts. So on all of your AG and AS relays just paper with alcohol? (Not sandpaper)

    They don't. You aren't doing anything wrong

    #28 2 years ago

    Business cards are usually used on the solid-state switches from the 80's with the black (purposely, not dirt) contacts on those kinds of switches. I haven't seen them on EMs. Everything else I use flexstone, etc., on. A guy around me swears on using a brite-boy, but sandpaper and whatnot gets me through just fine.

    #29 2 years ago

    I swear by a brush in a Dremel.

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