(Topic ID: 184511)

Mid 60's Gottlieb coin door wiring


By Runbikeskilee

2 years ago



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  • 6 posts
  • 3 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 2 years ago by Runbikeskilee
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    #1 2 years ago

    I am not sure I have ever seen this topic posted here.

    I have a '65 Gottlieb wedgehead that is in pretty nice shape. Some former owner had snipped off the wires to the coin-drop switches, at a point near the wiring bundle, wrapped the wire-ends in electrical tape, and removed the switches. The game is so nice that I thought I would make it whole again. I had the switch parts and figured I would splice replacement wires from the coin-drop switches back to the wiring bundle.

    However, when I unwrapped the electrical tape, I noticed the stranded wires coming out of the wiring bundle were silver in color. Was Gottlieb using aluminum wire during the mid 60s? I had not considered this.

    I am assuming that since the coin door operates on line voltage, I don't want to splice copper wires to the existing loose wires, as warned about in electrical wiring code? Does that make sense?

    Lee

    #2 2 years ago

    All wiring I've ever seen in pinball machines has been silver in color.

    I have a switch wiring in the manner you speak of (silver -> copper) for a few months and have no had any issues, I soldered them together and finished with shrink tubing. I would not/do not leave the machine plugged in all of the time anyways (and highly recommend against you doing so either ) so it is not as important as house wiring.

    #3 2 years ago

    outside of the 110 if it has it on the door, all of those wires are temp power, not always conducting.
    There is no noise level, or heat issue to be concerned with here. so splicing is ok, just a bummer different wire types to deal with.
    important thing is to clean those silver wire ends before you try to solder them.
    I use a dremel with a brass, or steel brush, they clean wire ends, and contacts very well.
    then they will take solder, no prob.

    #4 2 years ago
    Quoted from Dr_of_Style:

    outside of the 110 if it has it on the door, all of those wires are temp power, not always conducting.
    There is no noise level, or heat issue to be concerned with here. so splicing is ok, just a bummer different wire types to deal with.
    important thing is to clean those silver wire ends before you try to solder them.
    I use a dremel with a brass, or steel brush, they clean wire ends, and contacts very well.
    then they will take solder, no prob.

    Not true, games of this era have both a "120V hold" relay and a "30V hold" relay that need to be activated (are these both 30V driven? I think the 120V is only through the switches but at the same time that wouldn't make sense), and 120V through the start sequence. Also the same as games a few years newer (or if it's add-a-ball then especially), putting in a coin in the left slot will immediately start a game just like the start button would except without subtracting a credit. So with that paired with the age (120V vs. 30V), there is always some voltage at the credit switches.

    I know you said "outside of the door", but I assume you meant that the start switch is always hot (which it is) and the credit switches are not. However, they would have to be too as they "light up" the game (Gottliebs of this era are FULLY dark, then later when the 120v hold relay was removed and only the 30v hold relay remaining, they are only half-dark when first switched on just like they do if you manually activate the 120v hold relay) and kick it into the start sequence during the first start after the game is turned off.

    #5 2 years ago

    Just, "better safe than sorry". Advice is risky when dealing with that kind of voltage. Not 100% sure if I'm correct but I mean for a switch to work like that, there must always be voltage going to it (constantly, and not even just when it is "on", in the startup state it is as well), and I'm fairly certain it's 120V on this era of EM.

    #6 2 years ago

    Yes, I think you are correct and the schematic shows the coin drop switches are powered off of full line voltage.
    Were the wires of that era indeed aluminum? Can't imagine what else a silver-colored would be made of then?

    I guess to be sure, I just need to find similar wire, hopefully of the right insulation color. Hmmm.

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