(Topic ID: 118328)

Longevity of pinball?


By 5280wzrd

4 years ago



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  • Latest reply 4 years ago by thedefog
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    Topic poll

    “Longevity of pinball?”

    • A few more years 2-5? 15 votes
      6%
    • 10 years or until the "Kings" are gone. 64 votes
      26%
    • New and exciting innovations will allow pinball to live on 165 votes
      68%

    (244 votes by 0 Pinsiders)

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    There are 152 posts in this topic. You are on page 2 of 4.
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    #51 4 years ago

    If people like me can have a blast playing a pin like Slick Chick that was made 52 years ago (before many of us were born), I think it's easy to say that pinball will live on for a very long time.

    #52 4 years ago

    I don't remember pinball ever being that popular to begin with - at least where I grew up. The popular games that I remember where games like Street Fighter. Those always had a crowd around and constant play but that was never the case for pinball. Back then, I liked pinball but was never good at it or knew any rules. It usually cost more to play pinball so I did not play that much. I even worked at arcades for a while and don't remember pins being played all that much. Of course, I snuck a free game every now and then.

    Today, I am surprised that pinball is still alive. Before I got into the hobby, I didn't even know there were new machines being produced. Pins are more expensive than ever but not only is Stern cranking out games but so are other startups. I don't think it matters that kids are not into pinball - it's not like they are going to buy a machine.

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    #53 4 years ago

    honestly, i think people here are overestimating the nostalgia factor when accounting for pinball's recent resurgence. now, i'm not saying it's not a big component -- it is. but there is something else at work, too; something that bodes well for pinball's longevity.

    thinking back to when i was younger, in the 80s and 90s, when arcades were around, i was way more into the video games than pinball. i thought pinball machines were fun, sure, but my main focus was always the video games. pinball was more of a side novelty to me. i was drawn to the more unique experience that video games represented at the time. think about it. paying money to interact with a high-powered computer with state of the art graphics programmed to render an interactive game on a screen. that was a real novelty. a technological wonder that had the power to amaze. certainly not something one encountered outside of the confines of an arcade. video games were the novelty, the escape.

    but all that has changed. today it's just the opposite. video gaming on a computer screen is utterly ubiquitous. pretty much every one of us has an "arcade" at home (be it console or PC) if not in our pocket that blows away anything found in those old arcades, from a perspective of variety, graphical might, ruleset depth, and almost any other metric ... not to mention cost (even if most mobile games try to get you to pay money for boosts and upgrades, the most successful ones are all free to play). our PCs, consoles and phones absolutely trounce any arcade video game experience, and even if arcade games were superior to the phone games, the very idea of video games could not be more mundane. oh, another screen with computer-rendered graphics. just like i see all day every day. ho hum. seeing an arcade trying to charge for video games is like seeing a store that wants to charge you to drink from their water fountain.

    but that's not the case with pinball. suddenly, interacting with a set of real physical objects to manipulate an actual steel ball rolling around on a playfield triggering physical clockwork mechanisms and such -- that is the real novelty, the real escape. a new challenge. the experience unique enough that it's worth seeking out. it stands out because it's not just more cheap animated graphics on a screen.

    and i think the proof of its unique appeal in this digital world is pretty readily apparent. i've only been to a few small tournaments, but half or more of the participants looked like they were in their 20s -- too young to be nostalgic about location pinball. they are getting into owning machines, too. not in huge numbers, of course. money and space are huge barriers with this hobby. and pinball, while fascinating, is not exactly a huge craze with young people. but they do find it fascinating when they encounter it. the potential for a long period of prosperity is there.

    no, pinball is never going to be as popular as it was in the 70s when you could find a machine at every laundromat, arcade, pool hall, convenience store, whatever. but it is on the rise, and it's not going to die off with the current crop of 40-somethings and their game rooms. it's evolving. it's current success and its future survival will not depend on becoming more like video games. quite the opposite. much of its appeal today is directly a result of being a tactile, physical, mechanical experience. its best chance long term is in remaining an experience that phones and tablets can't reproduce.

    #54 4 years ago

    Im 27 own 8 games. I sold a Firepower to a 30yr old last week. It was his first game. Pinball will be around for my life time. Past that. Who knows.

    #55 4 years ago
    Quoted from pezpunk:

    but that's not the case with pinball. suddenly, interacting with a set of real physical objects to manipulate an actual steel ball rolling around on a playfield triggering physical clockwork mechanisms and such

    That's what hooked me. All of my friends were busy playing Call of Duty while I was at the mall on a pin. The physicality of it amazes me. I'm a young guy just out of college, and you can bet I'll have a pin in my house before a PS4. I know that puts me in the minority, but it'll be something unique for people to do when they come over.

    #56 4 years ago
    Quoted from winteriscoming:

    I think what pinball has going against it is that the current late 20's/early 30's people are among the last to have memories of abundant public arcades. I think a lot of what drives the desire to own games is the nostalgia factor, well and that it's just awesome!

    Nostalgia is such a huge factor. I'm 29, and public arcades were gone by the time I was a teenager. Redemption arcades hung on (the places with skee ball & go karts, etc). My family skied a lot when I was a kid. Luckily, all the ski areas still had small arcades. One arcade in particular I spent tons of time in had a Galaga and a Funhouse (lots of weekends between the ages of 8-13 or so). To this day, those are my two favorite games hands down.

    Classic arcades have made a comeback, which is a good thing for the younger generation (even if most of them are barcades...)

    #57 4 years ago
    Quoted from winteriscoming:

    Augmented Reality Pinball could be so awesome!

    I agree! In spirit, I imagine it will go on, but not in it's current form. The hobbyist that most of us are, will fade to nothing more then a few outliers playing their antique games in their basements. Which is probably the case already if you can see outside of the echo chamber that Pinside has become for most of us.

    #58 4 years ago
    Quoted from pezpunk:

    but that's not the case with pinball. suddenly, interacting with a set of real physical objects to manipulate an actual steel ball rolling around on a playfield triggering physical clockwork mechanisms and such -- that is the real novelty, the real escape. a new challenge. the experience unique enough that it's worth seeking out. it stands out because it's not just more cheap animated graphics on a screen.

    I agree with you completely on this point. No two games are alike, which is something you really can't get in the digital world.

    #59 4 years ago

    Even today "most" people do not even realize that pinball machines are still being produced...and we are in a mini-boom.

    The current rate of production won't last. The industry itself may or may not last another 20+ years.....but the hobby will. It will shrink to a "core" group of enthusiasts....but it will survive for the foreseeable.

    #60 4 years ago
    Quoted from jawjaw:

    I don't remember pinball ever being that popular to begin with - at least where I grew up. The popular games that I remember where games like Street Fighter. Those always had a crowd around and constant play but that was never the case for pinball. Back then, I liked pinball but was never good at it or knew any rules. It usually cost more to play pinball so I did not play that much. I even worked at arcades for a while and don't remember pins being played all that much. Of course, I snuck a free game every now and then.
    Today, I am surprised that pinball is still alive. Before I got into the hobby, I didn't even know there were new machines being produced. Pins are more expensive than ever but not only is Stern cranking out games but so are other startups. I don't think it matters that kids are not into pinball - it's not like they are going to buy a machine.

    When I was a kid, years ago, there would be lines for Black Knight 5 people deep with 20 quarters sitting on the machine. This was at Belmar Playland in NJ where they had at least 10 Black Knight machines.

    Prior to BK, Flash and Gorgar were immensely popular.

    #61 4 years ago

    The rising popularity of pinball now can be tied to the rise in the "Maker" community as well - people getting back to making actual physical things and interacting with the world with their own two hands rather than through a computer screen.

    Young people are so disconnected from the real world they are seeking out physical interaction, so they're building things, brewing beer, soldering electronics... and playing pinball, a decidedly physical activity that lends itself well to the whole movement. Not only do you get real life feedback when you play, they require maintenance and that appeals to the "tinkerer" side of things as well.

    How long will it last? Who knows. There will always be a "pinball" hobby, just like there are still blacksmiths, but it'll be just "boutique" and "artisanal" at some point.

    #62 4 years ago
    Quoted from Pahuffman:

    at the local barcade for like $25 worth of drinks and my friends would be there - even the non-pinheads.

    And so would I,but he's talking kids.

    I got some thumbs down for blasting tournament pinball.Its for the serious players,you have to "advance" to tournament play.its not a fun jumping off point for newbies.IMHO

    #63 4 years ago
    Quoted from pezpunk:

    honestly, i think people here are overestimating the nostalgia factor when accounting for pinball's recent resurgence. now, i'm not saying it's not a big component -- it is. but there is something else at work, too; something that bodes well for pinball's longevity.

    What are you comparing this recent resurgence too?What has pinball resurged too?

    #64 4 years ago

    I understand the "kids these days" sentiment, but the fact that teenagers aren't interested is irrelevant. I was in arcades all the time as a teenager and never liked pinball - now I'm obsessed.

    My league has 15 players in it. Only 4 are older than me (and 3 of those are people who had never played a league or tournament before). I'm 36 years old, so the league is primarily the supposedly unreachable millennials with their fancy technology. Thank goodness for that - at least several of them got the pinball bug from The Pinball Arcade app.

    #65 4 years ago

    Depends on how many the machine hoarders can store in their barns to rot away.

    #66 4 years ago

    I also don't think that nostalgia alone is the driving force behind pinball. Take myself for example. I recently got into pinball a few months ago after discovering that it did not die out in the late 90s when arcades disappeared. I played occasionally as kid, but I was always more focused on the video games at arcades. Video games have been my main hobby ever since I was a kid playing on my VIC 20. Now that I am older, I find that I do not have as much time to devote to video games and am struggling to keep my interest. Pinball is a game that works for me because I can play a game for a few minutes and have a great time.

    11
    #67 4 years ago

    All of this millenial-bashing is kind of tiresome. I can string sentences together and my attention span is more than sixty seconds. People should consider that the readership here is perhaps more diverse than they think.

    Quoted from Pahuffman:

    That's what hooked me. All of my friends were busy playing Call of Duty while I was at the mall on a pin. The physicality of it amazes me. I'm a young guy just out of college, and you can bet I'll have a pin in my house before a PS4. I know that puts me in the minority, but it'll be something unique for people to do when they come over.

    Yeah, I picked up a pinball machine as my third big purchase after making it into the workforce. Laptop and a car came first. Not particularly planning on getting a PS4, although I'll admit I do have a PS3, PS2, and even the original PlayStation.

    IFPA participation has been up 30% a year for at least the last four years. I'd like to buy stock in that. Internet presence and community has everything to do with pinball continuing to grow. I'd also go so far as to say if you're worried about your hobby dying out, you should make some effort to get people in your area jazzed up about it.

    Pinball Arcade is also a boon, whatever people have against it. I've introduced a number of people to physical pinball and most of them go out and immediately find PA on their own and next thing you know they're asking me for tips on Medieval Madness. It's extremely accessible.

    #68 4 years ago

    I think it all depends if it innovates to capture a new generation. The baby boomer generation had the Tommy days and the Gen X-ers came in during the DMD era.

    Unfortunately (or fortunately, depending on how you look at it), what's capturing the young market the most in terms of pinball is video pinball. The popular titles sell in the millions of units at $1 - 2 a pop on many platforms (PC/Mac, smartphones, tablets, consoles). Pinball might be evolving right out from underneath us.

    Of course, a lot of people here would say, "that isn't real pinball". But I'm sure when flippers came along in 1947 a lot of people said the same thing.

    #69 4 years ago
    Quoted from jackofdiamonds:

    And so would I,but he's talking kids.
    I got some thumbs down for blasting tournament pinball.Its for the serious players,you have to "advance" to tournament play.its not a fun jumping off point for newbies.IMHO

    I disagree. For people that like to compete, competition pinball is exactly what's needed. Just ask someone that's into running marathons and a decent percentage of the time the idea of running a marathon was what got them into running to begin with. It really depends on the person. I do think most tournaments should have B division play-offs for newer players after they are eliminated from the "normal" tournament.

    Having a local presence and engaging the people that are just hanging out when the league or tournament is going on is also a good thing. The learning curve is not as steep as it used to be thanks to the efforts of PAPA and PAPAtv.

    #70 4 years ago
    Quoted from Law:

    For people that like to compete, competition pinball is exactly what's needed.

    Bingo. Healthy competition is a big part of how I get people engaged. I mean, you'd play someone in a rack of pool at the bar for a free drink, right? Why not do the same thing with pinball? That's what I do. People get frustrated (and I get a few drinks) at first, but after a few nights the games get longer for them and they "catch the bug." I just like to show people how fun and engaging it can be while keeping the competition light but meaningful.

    #71 4 years ago
    Quoted from RampShot11:

    My 3 year old daughter loves playing my machines. She would play all day if I let her. Kind of shocking how much she likes them.

    image.jpg 153 KB

    Kind of ironic (as well as scary) that your daughter is standing on the front edge of a chair while playing No Fear.

    Good to see that she's into pinball! Might want to invest in a safer step stool for her though. Just sayin'.

    #72 4 years ago

    No end in site !

    #73 4 years ago
    Quoted from RobT:

    If people like me can have a blast playing a pin like Slick Chick that was made 52 years ago (before many of us were born), I think it's easy to say that pinball will live on for a very long time.

    Exactly. I've read thru this thread trying to come up with some kind of response. It is written like pinball has only been around for a few decades. Talking about the end of the line when the "kings" are all gone and such. Many of the "king" designers such as Harry Williams and Harry Mabs and many others have been gone for decades and that didn't stop pinball.

    For me and others I know, pinball doesn't have to become more technologically advanced with clustered playfields and drive-in movie screens to bring in new players and keep people interested.

    #74 4 years ago
    Quoted from o-din:

    For me and others I know, pinball doesn't have to become more technologically advanced with clustered playfields and drive-in movie screens to bring in new players and keep people interested.

    As I get older I appreciate EMs more and more, but when I was in my 20s I liked the newest and brightest. So, perhaps other young people are similar?

    #75 4 years ago

    It's a fun place to be and people like fun, so it'll be around for a long time... although my son doesn't seem enamored with inheriting my machines as "family heirlooms".

    Careers in pinball? few and far between.

    -Rob
    -visit http://www.kahr.us to get my daughterboard that helps fix WPC pinball resets and custom parts to help fix Williams sys 3-7 sound boards.

    #76 4 years ago
    Quoted from jwilson:

    when I was in my 20s I liked the newest and brightest. So, perhaps other young people are similar?

    I guess it depends on the person. When I was in my 20s, the newest and brightest were games like Black Knight. Although I had already been playing for years, it was not too difficult for the younger people and newcomers to play and understand.

    My daughter who is 16 now only likes to play the 60s vintage games I have, because she can enjoy them and doesn't have to figure out complicated rulesets that are not printed on the apron card. Maybe there is more to it than just that.

    #77 4 years ago

    Its a market...just like any other....highs followed by lows followed by highs and so on....2000 couldn't kill it, 2008/09 couldn't do it...I would say when my horde of silver is worth upwards of $200/oz, that would mean some really bad economic shit has gone down in this world and NIB pins will be done....

    On a side note, Ive often wondered the same thing about this white hot classic car market going on...Are all of us Gen x'ers and Millennials going to step in and pay these crazy town prices when all the baby boomers are long gone??

    #78 4 years ago

    Pinball is cool and people like cool things so when young people get older and have money they buy cool stuff. So pinball will carry on in the now younger generation.
    The last few games I sold where to guys in the 25 year old range getting their first pin and now they have more than one game. The last pin I sold was to a 16 year old kid that saved his money for years to buy.
    The Pinside community is a big help for new guys to get involved.

    #79 4 years ago

    I for one don't see myself loosing interest in the hobby, many many machines will be around for years to come. That's good for me as a collector. i was just thinking that this may be the last of the game designers. When they are gone/retired what happens then? Is the industry strong enough to get new blood into the pipeline?

    #80 4 years ago
    Quoted from 5280wzrd:

    i was just thinking that this may be the last of the game designers. When they are gone/retired what happens then? Is the industry strong enough to get new blood into the pipeline?

    All the big designers from WMS should be working with young ones at this stage. It is a crime that they aren't. A "new" designer would probably need to apprentice with an old one for many years and many game designs.

    #81 4 years ago
    Quoted from Mike_J:

    When I was a kid, years ago, there would be lines for Black Knight 5 people deep with 20 quarters sitting on the machine. This was at Belmar Playland in NJ where they had at least 10 Black Knight machines.
    Prior to BK, Flash and Gorgar were immensely popular.

    I take it that pinball is a lot more popular on the east coast than here in Texas. I finally had someone over at my house that showed any excitement at seeing my pins and actually wanting to play. Very rare.

    Nostalgia is what got me into pinball last year but that is less so now. There are so many pins I had never seen before and new ones that I like. Video games are less exciting these days so pinball is more appealing as something real and mechanical. I'm sure that is always going to appeal to certain people.

    #83 4 years ago

    Had a great day at our local scandia, played a ton of Metallica a few games of AC/DC (the left flipper is going out) one trend we noticed today was that a lot of kids would play pinball, start a game, play one ball then walk away. At one point (we were playing two player) we decided to pick up those leftover games between our own, taking turns with each ball. I'm hoping kids give it more than one chance as they get older

    #84 4 years ago
    Quoted from anubis2night:

    one trend we noticed today was that a lot of kids would play pinball, start a game, play one ball then walk away.

    That tends to happen when the kids have friends over and play pinball. I'll go down and find a few games sitting idle with the ball in the shooter lane. The kids will be in front of the tv playing the play station

    #85 4 years ago
    Quoted from jackofdiamonds:

    Tournament pinball is a TERRIBLE way to introduce pinball to a new generation.
    How long does the average tournament take? 8hrs? 3 days?No "millenials" are gonna have that kind of patience/attention span.
    No extra balls ,no specials, no matches,no explosions........boring.
    Pinball at its best can't compete with a 50" flat screen blowing up bad guys while you chat and join forces with people all over the world.No way.
    Pinballs got a couple of options.Go all the way back to making it a gambling device.Scores ,goals, skill=money.
    bring back P2K platform.....so you can blow stuff up with a pinball shot.

    Hmm... well, I've run over 40 tournaments that say you're wrong.

    I introduced the pin golf tournament to Pin a Go Go and in the first year, nearly half the field was playing in their first tournament ever. Several players went on to continue competing locally and one player started his own league in the Sacramento area.

    Another player who started at my tournaments now operates games in SF. And another now runs the bay area pinball map and runs tournaments of his own.

    You complain that tournaments take too long but then complain that extra balls aren't allowed. EBs aren't allowed in large part because they'd make the tournament that much longer. I'm pretty sure you haven't competed much.

    A lot of people have a warped view that competition isn't fun. It's an opportunity to challenge and test yourself, and equally important, meet people who are just as passionate as you are about the game and how to play it. Tournaments are social, stressful, but always fun if you don't take the event and yourself too seriously.

    #86 4 years ago
    Quoted from jonnyo:

    A lot of people have a warped view that competition isn't fun. It's an opportunity to challenge and test yourself, and equally important, meet people who are just as passionate as you are about the game and how to play it. Tournaments are social, stressful, but always fun if you don't take the event and yourself too seriously.

    Competitive pinball is fun when you know how to compete.If you're new to pinball how could tournament pinball be fun?Im glad you enjoy tournaments,lots do,but I don't se it as "an introduction to pinball".the tourneys you organized seemed to attract experienced players.One guy started a route!!!!Hes gotta know how to set up,repair,etc.All that screams experienced pinhead.Another dude started a league.That shows a deep seeded passion for pinball that wasn't started at your tournament ,dude was hooked before.

    Quoted from jonnyo:Tournaments are social, stressful, but always fun if you don't take the event and yourself too seriously.

    Well that sounds good but its something Ive never seen at tournaments.
    Heres my take:You stand around 5x(at least) more than you play.It takes a day,sometimes multiple days.
    Ive never seen the "don't take the event and yourself too seriously".NEVER.
    Its always a bunch of super serious players worrying about their world rankings and WPPR points.
    Ive seen temper tantrums by adults,complaints about slingshot kickers and do overs.Which rubbed all the other pinball players the wrong way.Frustration so thick you could it with a knife.
    Ive heard "don't talk" when others are playing.I saw one guy complain that people who weren't in the tourney were watching him while he played.....he didn't like that.Seen a kid who was there with his Dad cry when he got knocked out of the tourney.Really,gonna make a kid cry over a fuckin pinball game.Just put more money in.Oh wait can't do that its a tournament.

    All of this sounds like so much fun.

    if you play tournament pinball,you've been playing for a while.I think a better intro for a newbie would be league play.Or just meet me at the spot and lets blow 50 bucks on pinball.

    #87 4 years ago

    I don't have to be that into baseball to enjoy a game. And even though I'm into pinball I'd still enjoy a tournament. Being able to see how top players score on machines is always cool, plus, you get to see machines you might not usually see as well as some of the deeper rules

    #88 4 years ago
    Quoted from jackofdiamonds:

    Competitive pinball is fun when you know how to compete.If you're new to pinball how could tournament pinball be fun?Im glad you enjoy tournaments,lots do,but I don't se it as "an introduction to pinball".the tourneys you organized seemed to attract experienced players.One guy started a route!!!!Hes gotta know how to set up,repair,etc.All that screams experienced pinhead.Another dude started a league.That shows a deep seeded passion for pinball that wasn't started at your tournament ,dude was hooked before.

    Well that sounds good but its something Ive never seen at tournaments.
    Heres my take:You stand around 5x(at least) more than you play.It takes a day,sometimes multiple days.
    Ive never seen the "don't take the event and yourself too seriously".NEVER.
    Its always a bunch of super serious players worrying about their world rankings and WPPR points.
    Ive seen temper tantrums by adults,complaints about slingshot kickers and do overs.Which rubbed all the other pinball players the wrong way.Frustration so thick you could it with a knife.
    Ive heard "don't talk" when others are playing.I saw one guy complain that people who weren't in the tourney were watching him while he played.....he didn't like that.Seen a kid who was there with his Dad cry when he got knocked out of the tourney.Really,gonna make a kid cry over a fuckin pinball game.Just put more money in.Oh wait can't do that its a tournament.
    All of this sounds like so much fun.
    if you play tournament pinball,you've been playing for a while.I think a better intro for a newbie would be league play.Or just meet me at the spot and lets blow 50 bucks on pinball.

    Dude, what are you talking about? Where are these ridiculously over-the-top serious events that make little kids cry? Come on now.

    I've played at the largest tournament in the world twice (pinburgh) and it's like a huge party. I ran PPE 2011 (with Open, Novice and Kids divisions) and nothing like you described is even remotely true despite that the field had world-class competitors.

    In all my time in pinball I can count the true 'trouble-makers' on one hand (out of literally hundreds), and one them is a LEGEND, known to pretty much every high level tournament player. Even dealing with that guy I can still say the community is overall very positive and friendly to newbies.

    My guess is you haven't actually played in competition or maybe you had a bad experience at one event and formed your opinion from that.

    #89 4 years ago

    I too, have witnessed a youngster crying like a baby when eliminated. To be fair, he was in the A division which he had no business being in and got his clock cleaned.

    I've also seen the adults throwing temper tantrums when a switch doesn't score or a tight sling shot propels a ball into an outlane. That's actually pretty cool to see.

    These incidents took place almost a thousand miles apart.

    I'd love to have a player whine that I was watching him without me being entered in the tourney. People like that can go [edited by poster before a moderator ejects me].

    #90 4 years ago

    Will pinball go on? Yes.
    My neighbor at my office designs bycycles.
    He is the fourth largest bycycle maker in America.
    He Has himself and 1 helper.
    Every bike he makes is custom made for the rider who ordered it.
    Many types of manufacturing in America are now mom and pop shops.
    Every thing that is mass produced is made in china.
    Everyone that wants a high end, quality product will gladly pay for a quality made product.
    There are 300 million people in the USA alone.
    No one should have an issue of selling a 1,000 pinball machines. Even at 8,000 each.
    Yes, pinball will go on.long live the silver ball.

    #91 4 years ago
    Quoted from jonnyo:

    Hmm... well, I've run over 40 tournaments that say you're wrong.
    I introduced the pin golf tournament to Pin a Go Go and in the first year, nearly half the field was playing in their first tournament ever. Several players went on to continue competing locally and one player started his own league in the Sacramento area.
    Another player who started at my tournaments now operates games in SF. And another now runs the bay area pinball map and runs tournaments of his own.
    You complain that tournaments take too long but then complain that extra balls aren't allowed. EBs aren't allowed in large part because they'd make the tournament that much longer. I'm pretty sure you haven't competed much.
    A lot of people have a warped view that competition isn't fun. It's an opportunity to challenge and test yourself, and equally important, meet people who are just as passionate as you are about the game and how to play it. Tournaments are social, stressful, but always fun if you don't take the event and yourself too seriously.

    I played in the 1st pin a go go tourney that Johnny o ran.
    It was my 1st time playing in a tourney.
    It was fun for everyone.
    If you are playing pinball, even at pinburg
    And you are not having fun. You have issues.

    #92 4 years ago

    I've seen some serious temper tantrums thrown at pinball tournament by adults and I find it hysterical

    #93 4 years ago

    I've also been to tournaments where a couple of people have smelled so bad like they haven't showered in weeks.

    #94 4 years ago

    I see great stuff for pinball ahead. As long as these guys continue to push the envelope of technology.

    Multimorphic, Heighway, Jpop and JJP all doing very cool stuff in varying degrees. Even Stern.

    It's a great time to be in the pinball hobby.

    #95 4 years ago
    Quoted from jonnyo:

    Dude, what are you talking about? Where are these ridiculously over-the-top serious events that make little kids cry? Come on now.
    I've played at the largest tournament in the world twice (pinburgh) and it's like a huge party. I ran PPE 2011 (with Open, Novice and Kids divisions) and nothing like you described is even remotely true despite that the field had world-class competitors.
    In all my time in pinball I can count the true 'trouble-makers' on one hand (out of literally hundreds), and one them is a LEGEND, known to pretty much every high level tournament player. Even dealing with that guy I can still say the community is overall very positive and friendly to newbies.
    My guess is you haven't actually played in competition or maybe you had a bad experience at one event and formed your opinion from that.

    Hi guys ,just getting back.

    First let me say that i have played in some tournaments,2 PAPAs(B division) and 3 Pinsanitys here in NYC.Also played in a mini Tron launch party tourney once.

    My stance is that competitive pinball might not be the best way for a newbie to be introduced to pinball.Not that all competitive pinball is bad. I realize its a huge part of our hobby and that many love to participate.I understand that a few bad apples don't spoil the whole bunch.

    jonnyo,your take on firing up the competitive juices in a newbie might attract him to play more pinball.I hadn't considered this.I have to say i have some competitive type friends that this would certainly appeal too.I hadn't considered this but I have to agree.

    Unfortunately the examples of bad behavior I gave were all to real.

    I don't think its tournament pinball thats bad,just certain individuals.

    #96 4 years ago

    I think it's here to stay. Personally I think a lot of the recent growth in the hobby is partially due to people wanting a game that they can physically interact with and enjoy with others. As the use of cell phones, video game consoles, TV's, tablets and now virtual reality grows I think it makes people desire something that exists in the real world even more.

    #97 4 years ago
    Quoted from MrBally:

    I too, have witnessed a youngster crying like a baby when eliminated. To be fair, he was in the A division which he had no business being in and got his clock cleaned.
    I've also seen the adults throwing temper tantrums when a switch doesn't score or a tight sling shot propels a ball into an outlane. That's actually pretty cool to see.
    These incidents took place almost a thousand miles apart.
    I'd love to have a player whine that I was watching him without me being entered in the tourney. People like that can go [edited by poster before a moderator ejects me].

    A kid crying when eliminated is no big deal. Kids cry, that's what they do. I ran track and cross country all through grammar school and half of high school. I saw more kids cry than you can count.

    The question is whether the kid cried out of disappointment or because s/he was being mistreated (picked on, made to feel unwelcome, etc). The latter I've not seen, and in fact, quite the opposite. I see players going out of their way to encourage kids.

    #98 4 years ago
    Quoted from jonnyo:

    The question is whether the kid cried out of disappointment or because s/he was being mistreated (picked on, made to feel unwelcome, etc).

    I don't think its a reflection on the tournament but more of a reflection on the parent(s).

    #99 4 years ago
    Quoted from jonnyo:

    I see players going out of their way to encourage kids.

    #100 4 years ago
    Quoted from PanzerFreak:

    I think it's here to stay. Personally I think a lot of the recent growth in the hobby is partially due to people wanting a game that they can physically interact with and enjoy with others. As the use of cell phones, video game consoles, TV's, tablets and now virtual reality grows I think it makes people desire something that exists in the real world even more.

    It must be me then. I see just the opposite. My many nieces and nephews ranging from around roughly age 10 to 20-something have played a couple of games at family gatherings and that's about it. They are not "seeking out" any pinball on location at all. My older two in their twenties have NEVER had an interest at all in playing. My other younger two play a few here and there, but not much.

    The folks that are playing more often at our gatherings are my brothers, sisters, and friends that are in their forties and up...and we are a dying breed. Sad to say, but I don't think the kids will much appreciate inheriting whatever is in my collection when I go the way of the dodo...unless they can trade it for the latest i-whatever.

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