(Topic ID: 109725)

Let's talk about noise - pinball noise..


By Mar

5 years ago



Topic Stats

  • 47 posts
  • 33 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 5 years ago by MustangPaul
  • Topic is favorited by 3 Pinsiders

You

Linked Games

No games have been linked to this topic.

    Topic Gallery

    There have been 7 images uploaded to this topic. (View topic image gallery).

    image.jpg
    MIT-patent-Get-Smarth-Cone-of-Silence.jpg
    SnS_16_Wood-angle1000421954_4.jpg
    0330133_L.jpg
    image.jpg
    etb8Mdp.jpg
    vIA4PDA.jpg

    #1 5 years ago

    I recently moved into a new house, and where I now face a conundrum; Where we have moved to is very quiet, and it seems the whole street is in bed pretty early on a weeknight. The new game room, a brick garage, seems to not be good at deadening sound, and my lovely machines that I love to play for hours are now clacking and popping louder than ever before and they can be heard on the road clearly. Additionally, the sound goes through the house like the walls don't even exits.

    I can't imagine this is an unusual situation as I'm sure it's more common than rare amongst those who have game rooms. What do people do? Just not play at night? Install sound proofing? What do people recommend?

    #2 5 years ago

    Move into the woods far away from anyone else.

    #3 5 years ago

    I am fortunate that in my duplex my US neighbours have 3 large dogs. Therefore P+N=DN where
    P is pinball machines, N is noise & D is dogs so no problem although I tend not to play much beyond 8pm after the dogs go to bed for the night!!

    23
    #4 5 years ago

    When I first got my games I lived in a small apartment, was incredibly conscious of how loud they were, knew nothing about pinball, and worked until midnight. I tried some really, really dumb things so I could play my games at night. At least some of the ideas I can blame on old forum posts.

    1. Putting felt in the flipper coil stops. I seriously did this. (No you can't actually do this). I think I also tried those little rubber things you put on cabinet doors.
    2. Dynamat the inside of a cabinet. Holy crap. What the hell was I thinking.
    3. Rock wool insulation inside a cabinet. To be fair... this actually worked somewhat not that I would do it again.
    4. Acoustic foam inside a cabinet. Worked about as well as the insulation, potentially less flammable. Equally unadvisible!
    5. Installed Phoog's 0.25" thick pinball glass. I like the minor sound dampening and still use this glass, but it doesn't do much in the long term. Phoog gets a bonus for being the first sound deadening thing I tried where I wasn't actively trying to destroy a machine.
    6. Fancy acoustic blankets zip tied to PVC pipe. Oh yeah, it was classy:

    vIA4PDA.jpgetb8Mdp.jpg

    This actually worked wonders. It also made me look like a crazy person, but I didn't care. This was the ticket to apartment-living 3am pinball disturbing no one. You can see pile of acoustic foam on the floor in the first pic, yes I really tried insulating the interior of my cabinets at one point.

    7. I bought a house with far away neighbors because I wanted more pinball machines and didn't want to build a blanket dungeon for each of them. This seems to be a 100% fix.

    #5 5 years ago

    buy two barking dogs and put a big foutain with a bad pump motor in in the front yard. and maybe turns the pins down a little.

    #6 5 years ago

    get a kegerator fridge and start inviting the guys from the "hood" over to play. you will find out fast who the fun guys are and maybe breathe some fun back into that area.
    i wouldn't be conscious about it, if your noise bylaw is 11 or 10 pm i would start a precedence and play a few times until then.
    during the weekend though, i would play until the cops showed up if i felt like it.

    #7 5 years ago

    Are your garage walls insulated at all or is it like most garages and only one piece of plywood thick? Insulating and finishing the walls can go a long way toward sound reduction. Add some egg crate foam or garage door insulation to the inside of the garage door.

    #8 5 years ago
    Quoted from DefaultGen:

    6. Fancy acoustic blankets zip tied to PVC pipe. Oh yeah, it was classy:

    Where did you get those, and how expensive are they? I'd like to add some behind my curtains to help cut down the noise, both outgoing and incoming.

    #9 5 years ago

    We just play them until the neighbors call the cops.

    #10 5 years ago
    Quoted from Mar:

    I recently moved into a new house, and where I now face a conundrum; Where we have moved to is very quiet, and it seems the whole street is in bed pretty early on a weeknight. The new game room, a brick garage, seems to not be good at deadening sound, and my lovely machines that I love to play for hours are now clacking and popping louder than ever before and they can be heard on the road clearly. Additionally, the sound goes through the house like the walls don't even exits.

    I would not worry about it, Just because others go to bed early is not your problem, and your game room is none of their business. In every neighborhood there is always a asshole bully. I would never live in fear that my machines make some noise sometimes, the second you let the neighbors interlope on this they will also complain about other minor things and make your life a living Hell.

    #11 5 years ago
    Quoted from Pinplayer1967:

    I would not worry about it,

    Off topic - but where you live is one of my favourite Rancid songs.

    #12 5 years ago
    Quoted from neurokinetik:

    Where did you get those, and how expensive are they? I'd like to add some behind my curtains to help cut down the noise, both outgoing and incoming.

    These are the specific ones I had: http://www.vocalboothtogo.com/acoustic-and-soundproofing-products-vocal-booths/acoustic-(sound)-blankets-for-sound-absorption---producers-choice/sound-blanket-producers-choice-with-grommets.-solid-black/8-25

    #13 5 years ago

    Wow, some people are so inconsiderate...

    "the second you let the neighbors interlope on this they will also complain about other minor things and make your life a living Hell."
    Did you ever think that your playing pinball till 12am might be making your neighbour's life a living hell?

    #14 5 years ago

    I'm not inconsiderate at all, If I want to play pinball in my own home I'm not going to be scared and ask for permission first. Most people are not playing games at full volume on work nights with windows/doors wide open anyhow.....Seriously.

    #15 5 years ago

    Typically your neighbors aren't in the street but inside their own homes, which provide another layer of sound dampening.

    Assuming you're not talking about sound effect volume, which is easily controlled, then we are talking about typical impact noises which shouldn't be so loud that they penetrate the walls of two homes.

    I say, play, and ask your neighbors if it's a problem or they can hear it. When you do so, bring them a gift (baked goods or something). If it's a problem they'll tell you and the fact that you care and are trying to solve it with them will go a long way.

    #16 5 years ago

    Yep time to insulate. It looks silly but I've got friends who have carpeted the walls for a band practice room and it works pretty well. In a garage your gonna want an insulated door or at least fill in the back frame with styrofoam panels.

    #17 5 years ago

    I'm surprised to read pinball noise is a problem in a private residence even if it is in a detached garage. When I have my DW turned downed to the lowest setting, which is 8 for some reason, I don't hear it from the basement to the first floor. I have a 60 year old house and there is no sound proofing.

    #18 5 years ago

    garage door, 1/4" or 3/8" soft foam sheeting then 1" construction type foam-board to reflect sounds back, if not enough another layer soft over the foam-board oughtta do. linoleum adhesive and a toothed spreader works. it wont add a ton of weight but might need to re-tension some counterweight springs. this is all guessing you have a tin roll-up garage door, sound blows right through them so it'd be the first thing to tackle.

    if door treatment not enough, those brick walls are reflecting a lot of sound right into that door. ask permission to dumpster dive at a big carpet warehouse store, they're usually ok with the day or two extra before having to replace a full dumpster. you might get really lucky with what'll look nice enough with a little cleaning.

    does the garage have interior ceiling? if no, sheeting it with 2" foam-board likely a lot more sound deadening than much heavier 1/2" sheetrock. if yes same stuff wont add a lot of weight up there.
    garage will be easy-cheap to keep warm too. too ugly? cover with 2'x4' hanging ceiling panels glued up would deaden sound even more.. hadn't got to carpeting the garage floor yet, I wouldnt want to.

    #19 5 years ago

    Thanks everyone for the great responses. Insulating looks like the thing to do, but in the meantime I will try some of what you guys have suggested in regards to foam etc on the garage door (yes it's a tin roll up thing), and the walls.

    Personally, I do want to be a good neighbourhood citizen considering the reason we moved was because of horribly noisy neighbours at our old place! The last thing I want to do is put other people through that hell...

    #20 5 years ago

    That's hardcore....

    Quoted from DefaultGen:

    6. Fancy acoustic blankets zip tied to PVC pipe. Oh yeah, it was classy:
    image.jpg

    #21 5 years ago

    Headphone jacks from Pinovators?

    #22 5 years ago

    Wait a minute, before you spend money on anything, think about the issue a bit deeper. Has a neighbor complained yet?

    Unless your neighbors are sleeping outdoors or with windows opened all night, just turning the sound down a little should be fine.

    #23 5 years ago

    Sound proofing a pinball game in an apartment is completely different than having it in a detached house. Unless you're really close to another house.

    #24 5 years ago

    theres a little madness to the method with the soft foam first to the door, it should help stop rattling and act as buffer to the hard foam-board to lessen transmission to-thru the tin. soft foam over the foam-board pretty obvious, deadening sound and keeping that door light weight too is a challenge.

    at least it isnt like doing our old band's practice room, holy hell what a project! 1x2 as lath over the sheetrock for a 2nd layer of sheetrock with the dead air space between, the dumpster dived carpet for the big 14x20 room's walls took a while, 60+ square yards "free" is a lot of work and hauling! we got tons of suspended false ceiling panel from a leaky roof remodel site, just glued 2 layers to the ceiling was about 1-1/2" thick, so we didnt have to spend a fortune on materials to turn LOUD into quiet outside.. relatively quiet inside too outside the practice room. "oh hey lets practice at concert levels!" typical metalheads of course.

    #25 5 years ago

    As mentioned here, I wouldn't care too much before the neighbours actually complain...

    In my case, I live in an apartment, with extremely annoying neighbours living below, that will complain about anything possible. When I first got my pinball machine, I realised it might be too loud for them. I can hear their TV, so insulation is quite bad. I was just waiting for them to come over to complain as they usually do (they complain when they hear me walking, use the vacuum, when the kids play, when we watch TV, when we move a chair, when I put the alarm clock too early...).
    Well, to my surprise, they still haven't complained about the pinball machine!
    I have placed it strategically in a corner, probably above an area of the apartment that they don't use too often.

    So just relax, play pinball and if they complain start thinking about insulation and other methods to minimize the noise.

    #26 5 years ago

    I live in an apartment too for now, and I have been through the mill. You can actually do a lot to your machine depending on price range and effort.

    I'd recommend fixing the garage, but if you want to look at the machines, here's something you should take a look at:
    https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/projectmod-soundproofing-my-stern-st-pro
    http://tuukan.fliput.net/shutup_en.html

    I was about to go through the links above in order to reduce noise, but before doing anything major I realized that I may just be too self-conscious.
    So what I did was power on the machines, setting the volume a bit louder than what I normally would, and then have my fiancee banging on the flippers etc trying to produce as much noise, while I went to talk to the neighbors and asked if I could come inside and listen from their point of view.

    Turned out that no action was required at all even though their living room is RIGHT next to the machine, because it's a newly built apartment and it's very well isolated.

    TL:DR Multiple options, but try placing yourself in your neighbors shooes while the machines are being banged at, and figure out if it's really such a big problem as you think it is.

    #27 5 years ago
    Quoted from RyanStl:

    When I have my DW turned downed to the lowest setting, which is 8 for some reason, .

    Fyi, There is a menu setting to override that minimum volume and go lower.

    #28 5 years ago
    Quoted from cooked71:

    Headphone jacks from Pinovators?

    that will eliminate the game sounds, but do nothing about game electronics making noise (shaker motor, coils, etc...) which can surprisingly be quite loud.

    #29 5 years ago

    If you want piece of mind you will have to either insulate the walls and ceiling of our garage including the garage door.

    If you want to go all out, you will have to insulate the walls with soundproofing insulation, install a resiliant channel on the walls and ceiling, install konex or sound proofing sheetboard, insulate the joint with acoustiseal and then reinstall drywall.

    0330133_L.jpg

    SnS_16_Wood-angle1000421954_4.jpg

    But your biggest problem of all is your garage door. Even adding foam on the panels will help and make sure there is a seal all around.

    #30 5 years ago
    Quoted from j_m_:

    that will eliminate the game sounds, but do nothing about game electronics making noise (shaker motor, coils, etc...) which can surprisingly be quite loud.

    True. Even with the volume turned down, my one pin fills my 2 story house with noise. I guess it wouldn't be as much fun without all the mechanical sounds. It just sucks that I can't play it once my kids go to bed.

    #31 5 years ago

    jawjaw, do you think some machine isolator pads would help? your comment just inspired a design idea, might work especially well if your machines are already on carpet and padding.

    #32 5 years ago

    After the door Id look to close up any air gap leaks with spray foam or better seals on the doors. You'd be amazed what just normal roll in insulation with drywall will soak up. And if you don't have a ceiling even a drop ceiling with insulation on top makes a big diff. plenty of people I know have gone that route for a basement theater with very good results sound draining mats is prolly just overkill and at the least you'll benefit from r- value in a place you wanna keep somewhat warm

    #33 5 years ago
    Quoted from zizzlemeplease:

    jawjaw, do you think some machine isolator pads would help? your comment just inspired a design idea, might work especially well if your machines are already on carpet and padding.

    Nope. My house is an open design with all hard floors. With 3 kids, it's impossible to find a quiet spot in the house. The machine does not vibrate so I don't think any foot pads would help. I guess you could come up with a padded wrap for the machine but that might trap in too much heat.

    #34 5 years ago

    aww ok. friends place when in his basement and someone playing pinball above, the popcaps drive right into the (hardwood) floor like hammers, bit over half as loud for slingshots, simple vertical vs horizontal origins of the thumps.. idk, good foot isolators might help a bunch for that.

    what I'm thinking: foam backed indoor-outdoor carpeted bottom 1/2 thick 6" plywood disc, 6" OD 4-1/2" ID 1/2" thick plywood ring glued to disk, 4-1/2" dia. 1/2" thick closed cell foam rubber (pulati exercise mat stuff) with a 3-3/4" dia. 5/8" thick disc having a 2" dia. 1/4" deep depression cut in for the levellers to nest into.
    theyed raise a machine up maybe 1.5" (or less if levellers can be lowered), with the carpeted bottom and the closed cell foam combined buffering to a larger surface area (less PSI), I'd think it'd reduce the floor thump a lot. theyed be whipped up with a good set of hole saws pretty quickly, that and some wood glue, clamps, rubber cement stuff.. idk if iso-pads like THAT are available for pinball machines, they might even look good with routed corners, painted black, blue foam rubber "rings".
    -if someone starts producing them dont ya dare forget me allright! (yeah sure I'd want 5%)

    #35 5 years ago

    Is it me, or are modern Sterns quieter than BW games?

    1 week later
    #36 5 years ago

    A friend of mine has a Goldeneye, and i think it is very quiet compared to my STTNG, TS and BSD.
    I also feel that my T3 is in the same noise range as Goldeneye.

    I have thought about things that could make the pinball less noisy, but I don`t think it is possible.

    Maybe you could have some padding on the coilstop, but i think it would last one game only...

    If somebody has a solution, i would be happy to try it out.

    Axl

    #37 5 years ago

    I've actually found my Tron is quite a bit louder than my BoP and Gorgar. I'm not talking about speech and music volume, I'm talking about the clacks and pops of jets, flippers, kickouts etc. I'm pretty sure they are more powerful on new pins like the Stern machines, and that's why.

    So yes, it's these sounds that are the problem in my area. I can turn the music / speech down to almost nothing, but the physical mechanicals of the game are set at one volume level only! Even the flipper buttons are noisy and especially during a slap save...

    Taking advice from this thread and other things I have read, I've done a bit of work on my garage. I've sealed a lot of cracks and gaps with sealant, such as around windows (which had gaping holes) and large cracks in the brickwork. I've also covered up vents with some foam I had lying around. This has actually produced a surprisingly good result. I read (from a link posted here) that sealing even a small crack in brickwork can reduce noise escaping by about a third. And I think that is certainly true at least in my environment.

    Walking around the outside of the garage while the game is played, I only really have 3 problem areas now. One is the back door to the garage which I'm not concerned about. The others are the window (sound goes straight through that glass) and the garage door which is much worse than the window. The garage door is so bad it may as well not even be there. If I walk up my driveway to the road I can hear the game clearly, which is bad news for 10pm and onward play...

    So, good results but still some work to do. I'm going to get some sound proofing blankets like the ones posted in this thread for the window and garage door. I'm hoping, and to be honest reasonably confident, that this will get my garage to an acceptable level for the short to mid term and I can just play my games. Long term I'll look at either insulation or perhaps knocking the garage down and building a proper game room from scratch.

    #38 5 years ago

    lamination of soft foam, foam board, soft foam, wasnt enough for the tin door? next thing I'd try is false ceiling panel, should be just enough room for 2 layers thick, but it's going to add a good bit more weight than the foam board stuff. another possible, in the recording studio back when, we had a couple portable walls (on wheels) for absorbing and reflecting sound, they were about 5' tall. theyed stop or bounce most of the sound but still short enough to see over their tops when standing.

    #39 5 years ago

    This maybe?

    MIT-patent-Get-Smarth-Cone-of-Silence.jpg

    #40 5 years ago
    Quoted from Mar:

    If I walk up my driveway to the road I can hear the game clearly, which is bad news for 10pm and onward play...

    I've always been conscious and a little concerned about outside pinball noise.I just don't want the neighbours or people walking by to know I got games.It might attract unwanted attention when no one's home.They know of the games,but lets see what other stuff might be there for the under the arm taking.

    Hanging rugs on walls and laying them on floors helps deaden the sound/noise.I envy the basements some of the US pinsiders have.

    Hope you can find a solution you're happy with.

    #41 5 years ago
    Quoted from chalkup8:

    I've always been conscious and a little concerned about outside pinball noise.I just don't want the neighbours or people walking by to know I got games.It might attract unwanted attention when no one's home.They know of the games,but lets see what other stuff might be there for the under the arm taking.
    Hanging rugs on walls and laying them on floors helps deaden the sound/noise.I envy the basements some of the US pinsiders have.
    Hope you can find a solution you're happy with.

    The basement is a luxury I know I take for granted. The pins can be cranked up with subs on each one and the neighbors hear nothing. Earth is a bread sound killer.

    #42 5 years ago
    Quoted from pinball_erie:

    The basement is a luxury I know I take for granted. The pins can be cranked up with subs on each one and the neighbors hear nothing. Earth is a bread sound killer.

    Thanks for rubbing my nose in it. ha ha!

    I would love a basement.It would be under a rug in the living space with a hinged trap door entrance leading down a flight of stairs to the spacious gameroom floor. It's nice to dream.

    #43 5 years ago

    Wasn't rubbing your nose............but while I'm at it. When we had the house built, we had the land sloped to one back corner and that gave us a French door walk out basement in the one corner. I've never had to use the stairs to get a pin into the gameroom!!

    Are there no basements around you? I have buddies who live in other states and they can't have basements.

    #44 5 years ago

    How about covering the door and window with acoustic foam?
    image.jpg

    #45 5 years ago

    I live in a condo with people on either side, above and below me. My pins are in a fully enclosed and carpeted patio area. It used to be an outdoor patio that was walled off with large windows frames long before I bought it (I have nice shades though that keep the pins out of direct sunlight). It's a very quiet part of the condo complex too, so I have been pretty concerned about the noise. There is a "quiet time" rule imposed by the HOA after 9pm so I've never really played them past that time. So far I haven't had any complaints from neighbors, or any comments at all in passing either. I've thought about asking but didn't want to call any attention to it on purpose.

    I don't want to be that rude neighbor, but I'm almost tempted to just play later at night just to see if someone says something. I live alone so I haven't been to see what it might sound like while playing from outside. I have remember to try that the next time I have people over.

    #46 5 years ago

    I'm thinking of wrapping my neighbor across the street's wind chimes in acoustic foam. Talk about annoying!

    #47 5 years ago
    Quoted from chalkup8:

    I would love a basement.It would be under a rug in the living space with a hinged trap door entrance leading down a flight of stairs to the spacious gameroom floor. It's nice to dream.

    Well you could always move the the Opal fields there. The whole "house" is underground and if you want to expand you would probably find enough Opal to pay for the dig AND the games to put in it.

    Promoted items from the Pinside Marketplace
    $ 48.00
    Cabinet - Other
    ModFather Pinball Mods
    From: $ 22.95
    Apparel - Men
    Great American Pinball
    $ 27.99
    Eproms
    Matt's Basement Arcade
    From: $ 99.99
    Cabinet - Other
    Lighted Pinball Mods
    $ 45.00
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    Great American Pinball
    $ 79.99
    Cabinet - Armor And Blades
    PinGraffix Pinside Shop
    $ 35.00
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    3D MODS
    $ 75.00
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    RGP Models
    From: $ 9.99
    $ 10.95
    Apparel - Unisex
    Pinball Wheezer
    $ 69.99
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    Lighted Pinball Mods
    $ 90.00
    Lighting - Under Cabinet
    Rock Custom Pinball
    $ 79.99
    Cabinet - Armor And Blades
    Great American Pinball
    $ 4.49
    Electronics
    Yorktown Arcade Supply
    $ 8.99
    Lighting - Other
    Pappy's Pinball Palace
    $ 86.95
    Cabinet - Shooter Rods
    Super Skill Shot Shop
    From: $ 42.00
    Cabinet - Shooter Rods
    ModFather Pinball Mods
    From: $ 175.00
    Gameroom - Decorations
    Pinball Photos
    $ 159.99
    Lighting - Other
    Lighted Pinball Mods
    From: $ 5,899.95
    Pinball Machine
    Pinball Pro
    $ 9,099.00
    Pinball Machine
    Operation Pinball
    $ 79.00
    $ 68.00
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    PinWorlds
    From: $ 42.00
    Cabinet - Shooter Rods
    ModFather Pinball Mods

    Hey there! Got a moment?

    Great to see you're enjoying Pinside! Did you know Pinside is able to run thanks to donations from our visitors? Please donate to Pinside, support the site and get anext to your username to show for it! Donate to Pinside