Let's figure out the minimum parts to build a whitewood


By Aurich

2 years ago


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    #86 2 years ago
    Quoted from Aurich:

    ...
    my personal dream kit would be all the electronics to get you going, with clear and easy instructions for how to connect them all. A CNC'd playfield that at the very least included the bottom 3rd. If you want to do something custom down there then fine, but most people will be fine with a standard setup at least for their first attempts.

    This is something we've discussed doing for ages, but we keep deciding not to offer a 'custom machine dev kit' because:

    - Many people want to do some of the things on their own (electronics, woodworking, etc) so they wouldn't want a full kit. Partial kits are available today. Obviously we offer a mature and feature-rich control system (P-ROC + PDBs).

    - Cost - it won't be cheap.

    - Market will be quite small. Maybe 30 (?) people will buy it, all said and done, unless you can make it cheap enough for impulse buys (and for educational purchases for schools/kids). Making it that cheap (< $200?) is practically impossible, especially given the need for extremely detailed documentation for the educational markets.

    I love the idea and would like to see it happen, but the economics make it tough to justify the effort. It might work better just as a set of plans (cut your own p/f, make your own cables, etc), but that's essentially a plan for building a generic custom machine. Since most would rather build their own idea of a custom machine, we're back to where we are now... the pieces are available.

    Lots of people are discussing their custom projects on the forums at http://www.pinballcontrollers.com/forum/index.php?board=17.0. It might be worth discussing the idea with them to see if a custom-pinball dev/tinker kit would have interested them when they started their projects.

    When we first designed the P-ROC, we wanted to come out with a peg-board style (not exactly, but that's kind of the idea) dev kit for custom machine developers. We talked about it with JPop, who (now years later) might still be planning to move forward with the idea. I still question the size of the potential market vs the dev effort and cost to make it happen. Perhaps some of you will prove me wrong. If you want to package it with a mature and easy to use control system, contact me privately and we can work it out.

    - Gerry
    http://www.multimorphic.com

    #305 2 years ago
    Quoted from shimoda:

    As far as he cost of PROC or Fast, once you get into all the parts, how much difference is there?

    I'm sure I can speak for all of the control system suppliers when I say that the BOM costs would be slightly cheaper if you build your own board (assuming you can get the PCB for relatively cheap). This also assumes you already have all the tools (hardware and software) you need for designing/building boards.

    The advantages of using an existing board or boards:

    - We've already thought through most of the design considerations and tradeoffs
    - The designs are complete
    - Everything is tested / working
    - Boards are available now - so you can get up and running quickly
    - Mature software frameworks exist, and new ones will almost certainly support the popular boards
    - Community support exists (and thrives)

    Most people just compare BOM costs and come to the conclusion they could do it for cheaper, but the rest of the list will save you literally 1000's of hours. We've even had both individuals and companies come to us after rolling their own to switch to ours.

    If you enjoy doing the low level implementations yourself, you might be happier going that route. If you're looking to save a few bucks, then you're clearly not valuing your time.

    I'm honestly not trying to talk anybody out of rolling their own; just encouraging you to think about the entire project and not just the cost of the board BOM.

    - Gerry
    http://www.multimorphic.com
    http://www.pinballcontrollers.com

    #323 2 years ago
    Quoted from Wolfmarsh:

    One of the main improvements was bulletproofing the solenoid drivers and the switch matrix. You can literally dead short a solenoid and it won't blow the driver. The chipset can even tell you which solenoid is shorted. It's got several other types of fault detection built in as well.
    It's got built in voltage monitoring and dynamic adjustment. For example, if your line voltage sags, like at a pinball show, it will automatically adjust the pulse sent to the solenoids to account for it. If the voltages still fall outside of an acceptable range (think 5V, 12V, etc...), it can throw an error condition on that as well.

    At the risk of taking this conversation a bit farther off topic...

    Both of these are great features that will come in incredibly handy when they're needed. How often they're needed is obviously different for every user (some - never, others - often). Therefore they both fall under the tradeoffs I mentioned. Both introduce additional components (cost) and design/debug time that in an off-the-shelf product translate to higher price. There's no right or wrong on whether they should be designed in. Each designer / product manager should decide if the additional cost/time is justified versus the likelihood of needing them.

    I opted for lower price and *still* get criticized for pricing. To offset the choice of not including additional protection circuitry, all of the parts that traditionally blow on a switch or driver board are socketed and/or through-hole for relatively easy repair.

    Regardless of my choice, I applaud you for designing them in. Your machine will no doubt be a joy to wire/program/debug with little risk of hardware failure due to accidental shorts or failing playfield components.

    - Gerry
    http://www.multimorphic.com
    http://www.pinballcontrollers.com

    #439 2 years ago
    Quoted from Aurich:

    Oh I have. I know it's not all P-ROC. But I also know that Gerry deletes threads that are about competitive products.

    This isn't true. I've never deleted posts or threads about competitive products. In fact in the lifetime of our forums, I've only deleted one non-spam thread. That specific thread was, IMO, an inappropriate post made by a competitor.

    We certainly reserve the right to delete any post that we find distasteful, but I personally don't find level-headed discussions about competitive products to be distasteful. I quite enjoy them actually.

    - Gerry
    http://www.multimorphic.com
    http://www.pinballcontrollers.com

    1 week later
    #550 2 years ago
    Quoted from LapsedGamer:

    will just mess around with Arduino until then.

    Depending on the complexity of your game, you can actually get really far with an Arduino plus our driver boards. This is what Brian does for his machines (https://howtobuildapinballmachine.wordpress.com/).

    Our driver board interface is completely open. When we released the boards, I published a sample arduino script for controlling them: http://www.pinballcontrollers.com/index.php/products/driver-boards/driver-board-faq/83

    - Gerry
    http://www.pinballcontrollers.com
    http://www.multimorphic.com

    4 months later
    #866 2 years ago
    Quoted from Mocean:

    Could you also post which 485 adapter you are using?

    Here's the one we've been recommending for non-P-ROC users: http://www.futurlec.com/Mini_RS422.shtml

    Note - this is a 5V part for use with 5V controllers. The one ecurtz linked is a 3.3V part.

    - Gerry
    http://www.pinballcontrollers.com
    http://www.multimorphic.com

    1 month later
    #943 2 years ago
    Quoted from Aurich:

    Developing a P3 game is going to be a ridiculous amount of work.

    If by "ridiculous amount of work" you mean significantly less than developing a machine from scratch, then I agree.

    - Developing a playfield module for the P3 is much easier, simpler, quicker, and less expensive than developing a full-sized playfield.

    - Developing software is also much easier; we've already done much of the work. If you're worried about developing content for the playfield LCD, don't be. You can very quickly create a traditional style (static image with 'blinking insert lamps'), and if you want to go fully dynamic, that's possible too. Our dev framework works seamlessly with Unity3D, the most popular 'game engine' in the game dev community (read: mature and has a huge support community). It also comes with a full playfield simulator and a playable sample game with many mode examples, including ones where the ball interacts with virtual targets.

    - Developing cab artwork is no different than with any other game. Plus, the end result is easily replaceable with our magnetic artwork system.

    - Developing a control system solution is... already done. The control system is part of the platform. You simply put the driver and switch boards you need on/under your playfield module, and it acts as an extension of the platform simple. That's one huge advantage of our modular, chainable, extensible control system (P-ROC / P3-ROC + driver and switch boards).

    - Building a cab is... not necessary. We've done that for you.

    - The manufacturing process is also much, much, much simpler for P3 games than for traditional games (or even full-size playfield kits for other platforms).

    And without a large built in base the payoff just isn't there.

    I disagree. The instant payoff is a significantly easier game development process as described above. Certainly the long-term payoff and business advantage is the eventual installed base of P3 machines, and that will take a little time, but if you're comparing a P3 game dev to a traditional game dev right now, both start in the same place... no installed user base. With the P3, the user base will grow and develop into an easily addressable market. With traditional games, there's no such thing as an installed user base because the games are stand-alone.

    Multimorphic needs to prove the platform, ship games, and demonstrate some viability before anyone is going to jump into that pool.

    The dozens of people already jumping into the pool would clearly disagree with you.

    I wish them luck! But there's a real hill to climb in front of them just to see some first party success, definitely feels too early for expecting 3rd party support. IMHO.

    We're not *expecting* 3rd party support. We're just developing a platform that enables 3rd party development and significantly simplifies the game development process. We're obviously also developing our own games (ie. Lexy Lightspeed - Escape From Earth and others to follow soon thereafter). The P3 provides developers with all of the advantages described above, hopefully/eventually including an installed user base. If 3rd party developers do develop games, it'll make good business sense for them, and it'll be a huge plus for P3 customers.

    - Gerry
    http://www.multimorphic.com

    #945 2 years ago
    Quoted from Law:

    Respect you a lot, Aurich, but going to have to disagree with most of your assertions there.
    Didn't Heigway try to do something similar but with the caveat of "we own everything you create" only a month or so ago? No such restrictions here as far as I can tell.

    Correct, no restrictions here. We might participate in a certification and/or labeling process, but you retain full ownership of all P3 games you create. We'll of course offer as much help as we can provide (ie. design and/or manufacturing services). You can use that help or completely ignore it.

    The more P3 games there are, the happier the community will be.

    - Gerry
    http://www.multimorphic.com

    #947 2 years ago
    Quoted from Aurich:

    Well that's really the point though, isn't it? With a standalone game I can sell it to anyone. With a P3 game I can only sell it to someone who owns a P3 cabinet. Right now that number is zero.

    With a standalone game, you buy a full machine (playfield + cabinet + everything else). You start with nothing and wind up with a playable game.

    If you want a 3rd party P3 game and don't already have a P3, you buy a P3 + the game. You start with nothing and wind up with a playable game.

    If we offer an empty P3 system (no game) for sale, then it's a perfectly valid comparison, with the exception that you're buying 2 items instead of one (but for similar total pricing). That said, I suspect customers will likely opt to buy the P3 with the included game; so they'll end up with 2 games for what is likely significantly less than 2 standalone games. P3 pricing isn't final yet, though, so the exact math is TBD. Pricing should be finalized soon as we ready our production BOM.

    What you're focusing on (marketing 3rd party P3 games to existing P3 customers) is an advantage that will develop over time as people buy P3's. I fully agree with you there. Until then, to repeat, you'd start with no cab & no game and end up with a fully playable game in either case (P3 vs Standalone). Then you can build up your game library with new game kits as they become available from Multimorphic and 3rd parties. We expect game kits to cost around the $1.5k-$2k range, with complexity-based outliers.

    Companies in many market segments develop and market applications to people without the requisite base hardware. If people want the application, they buy the hardware to run it.

    To bring this post back on topic (or at least close), the P3 represents a platform that makes it significantly easier to build games vs a standalone game. If a game dev simply wants to create a game by focusing only on the actual application needs (p/f layout, rules, art, software), they can do that successfully with a P3. When building a standalone game, there's a lot more work they'll have to do.

    - Gerry
    http://www.multimorphic.com

    #957 2 years ago
    Quoted from Wolfmarsh:

    The platform wants to be a pinball machine, but is definitely not a video game. I think it might have more success as something entirely new. A lot of this is off the cuff, so some (or all) may not stand up to scrutiny.

    I appreciate your comments. One of the biggest advantages of the modularity is that we can experiment with different things and go down paths similar to some that you're suggesting. Gotta start somewhere though. We'll certainly have some future games that push the boundaries in all directions, and hopefully some 3rd party developers will do the same. (Not all though, we still want a nice selection of traditional-style pinball games and variations thereof. After all, pinball is loved for particular reasons.) The risk of experimenting is significantly less for a P3 game kit than for a full stand-alone machine. So we're all excited to see what ideas get implemented and which ones succeed.

    - Gerry
    http://www.multimorphic.com

    3 weeks later
    #1001 2 years ago
    Quoted from VacFink:

    The Fast boards, if you buy outside of the package allows the builder to scale up as they develop, buying the minimum components and adding daughter or other boards based on needs as the layout/design matures.

    That's how the P-ROC driver boards (PDBs) work too. Many people develop and grow their machines exactly as you describe (buying one or two driver boards at a time).

    Summarizing the other thread:
    - Price is comparable with both solutions (when using P-ROC w/ integrated switch matrix + 32 direct switch inputs)
    - Both are chainable / extensible.
    - P-ROC is supported by multiple software frameworks (MPF, pypocgame, pyprocgameHD+SkeletonGame, netprocgame)
    - P-ROC has a huge customer base and active support community
    - PDBs have been stable and shipping for 3+ years
    - PD-16 banks are fused directly on the PD-16s - makes debug significantly easier.

    Feel free to jump onto the forums at http://www.pinballcontrollers.com/forum to meet the community and ask any specific implementation questions you have.

    - Gerry
    http://www.multimorphic.com
    http://www.pinballcontrollers.com

    #1006 2 years ago
    Quoted from Aurich:

    Gerry, can you please stop trying to drive people to your forum in my thread? It's kind of rude man. Pimp your product all you like, you're a huge supporter of DIY pinball and I love it, but I'm trying to generate discussion here, on Pinside, about this stuff. And you're trying to suck it away to your own sandbox.

    That's not my intention at all - sorry you feel that way. I'm glad this thread exists, and I'm certainly happy to participate in discussions here as much as my limited time allows. There are other members of the P-ROC community doing so as well.

    That said, the P-ROC community has hundreds of members who aren't Pinside users. To not let people know that there is a huge community of people developing and supporting other P-ROC projects would be depriving them of one of the greatest things about custom pinball development, passionate and specific community support. If there were similar communities for the other control system options, I'd expect links to their support communities as well. I'd call that helpful, not rude. Rude would be intentionally hiding resources that could help people be successful with their projects or encouraging others to hide them.

    - Gerry
    http://www.multimorphic.com
    http://www.pinballcontrollers.com

    1 week later
    #1040 2 years ago
    Quoted from fastpinball:

    I think it can feel that way when the discussions focus only on hardware.

    Wait... what? Hardware comparisons are where the P-ROC shines, as are support considerations and software framework compatibility.

    Despite being released 6 years ago (April 2009), the P-ROC is still the only WPC-compatible (and Stern Whitestar and SAM) off-the-shelf controller board available, has a huge support community, hundreds of developers, 3+ open-source software frameworks (pyprocgame / pyprocgameHD, MPF, netprocgame), and is at feature parity with boards that are yet-to-be-released. Is this where we talk about reinventing the wheel? The P-ROC is also used in a number of system 11 games in concert with Mark's interface board.

    The P3-ROC and PDBs were released 3 years ago and are the fastest, most capable custom pinball controller boards in the industry, even when compared to recent offerings from other MFGs. They are supported by the same software frameworks mentioned above.

    There are literally hundreds of custom machines and rethemes using the P-ROC or P3-ROC, as well as a handful of new (hopeful) MFGs. We of course use the P3-ROC and PDBs in our P3 machine as well. In fact, just about every board we use in the P3 will be available for purchase. Many are already available.

    If there are additional features people need our boards to support, we're listening. The firmware for both the P-ROC and P3-ROC is field upgradeable, and we're always open to discussions about new features. Supporting customers and helping them with their projects is a huge part of what makes this business fun. I think that's why so many P-ROC users participate in our support community.

    - Gerry
    http://www.pinballcontrollers.com
    http://www.multimorphic.com

    #1052 2 years ago
    Quoted from Aurich:

    Right, that's why I thought the number was so cool. If there are "literally hundreds" then that means there must be just a ton of homebrew projects I've never seen.

    There are, and I've never seen many of them either! We get pre-sale emails and orders from many people who never ask for help or talk about their projects on any public forum I read. Sometimes they email us with pics and videos after their projects are complete, and sometimes we see them for the first time when they choose to reveal the games to the public. I suspect you'd be surprised how many repeat orders we get from folks who claim to have finished one game and are starting on their next.

    To Rosh's point, our customers are worldwide. There are probably 100+ custom projects being developed right now over in Europe... both personal and professional projects. There are a bunch in Australia and New Zealand too. I hope we'll get so see them all some day, but it's unlikely many of them will make their way over here. Also, it's not uncommon for folks to tell me they don't want people judging their efforts. Most just do it for fun.

    - Gerry
    http://www.pinballcontrollers.com
    http://www.multimorphic.com

    #1086 2 years ago
    Quoted from epthegeek:

    Just guessing here, but Gerry may be including individual occurrences of each title in the 'literally hundreds' - so ALL the CCCs, ALL the BOP2.0s, etc. In that sense, PROCs really are driving hundreds of games.

    Honestly, I wasn't trying to sneakily inflate the number. There are hundreds of unique projects being developed on the P-ROC. Custom pinball is thriving.

    - Gerry
    http://www.pinballcontrollers.com
    http://www.multimorphic.com

    1 month later
    #1146 2 years ago
    Quoted from jwilson:

    That's one thing that hasn't really advanced at all in decades - switch tech in pins. What other options are there besides optos and hall effects?

    Super fast and super sensitive RFID embedded into ball!

    - Gerry
    http://www.multimorphic.com

    3 weeks later
    #1192 1 year ago

    I hope you guys forgive the short trip down memory lane, but I'm absolutely loving this conversation, and it reminds me of the feedback I most commonly received when first designing the P-ROC.

    Just about everybody who reviewed the board (not just a couple of people, but practically everybody) told me to remove the usb port and design in an embedded cpu.

    The biggest reason I didn't do that was because of this exact conversation. I wanted people to be able to choose the processing engine that fit their needs. That was in March 2009, three years before the release of the first raspberry pi. I used an old MacBook pro and a desktop Linux box for development, and I ran my first P-ROC game (JD) on an original Beagleboard.

    Fast forward 6.5 years later, and we have some users using $25 credit card sized single board computers and others using full sized computers to do real-time rendering on 1080p displays using game engines like Unity3d.

    It's been a crazy ride and fun to watch the evolution of custom and boutique pinball development. Can't wait to see what's to come!

    See you guys at Expo!

    - Gerry
    http://www.multimorphic.com

    1 week later
    #1303 1 year ago
    Quoted from Bonnevil69:

    Also no shooter lane so it expands what I am able to fit.

    This makes me smile every time I read it.

    - Gerry
    http://www.multimorphic.com

    #1306 1 year ago

    From the early P3 protos to the current, nearly-finished ones, we've had maybe 3 people comment about our lack of shooter lane. IMO, that playfield space is much better used in gameplay than launching a ball into play, well-implemented spring-based skillshots notwithstanding. There are many other ways to implement skillshots.

    - Gerry
    http://www.multimorphic.com

    #1358 1 year ago
    Quoted from Zitt:

    Dude; that's picture is from like early development. It's the wood grained cabinet from like 3 years ago.... probably at TPF'2013 or something.
    The current Cabinet is more traditional. I wouldn't assume the MFG protos are using coils based upon that picture.

    Whoa, that's quite the blast from the past! That was the headless cabinet that we built in mid-2012 with the flip-up glass, fixed upper playfield, 27" playfield display, and original P-ROC board (as opposed to the P3-ROC we designed shortly thereafter). That image still looks super cool to me, but pretty much everything has changed. That playfield was a proof of concept for the ball-tracking, playfield display, floating flippers/slings, rear trough, and wall/scoop assembly. We've since re-engineered everything, resulting in a fully modular system with a number of enhancements that will benefit owners, players, and game designers.

    The modularity of the system is quite relevant to the discussions in this thread. We can (and will) continue to improve sub-assembly designs throughout the life of the platform to reduce weight, improve performance and reliability, and reduce cost. So the current wall/scoop assembly (which is different than the one in the pic) could later be replaced by a new and improved wall/scoop assembly (assuming such improvements are warranted).

    - Gerry
    http://www.multimorphic.com

    2 months later
    #1430 1 year ago

    Lexy Lightspeed - Escape From Earth has one too: Reverse-O-Matic

    - Gerry
    http://www.multimorphic.com

    1 week later
    #1459 1 year ago
    Quoted from unigroove:

    Another question: If you were to program a prototype to show to a potential manufacturer, including the main rules programmed, which platform and/or programming language is recommended (including use of an LCD with video as well as simpler alphanumeric LED displays)?

    Depends on what you're hoping will happen. If you want an MFG to buy or license the design from you, then good luck. If you want the MFG to act as a contract manufacturer and build the game as you designed it, then they'd be working for you and should be willing to use whichever [off the shelf] control system you want them to.

    You can't go wrong with the P-ROC or P3-ROC. Our hardware is mature and being used in literally hundreds of individual new custom machine projects and by a half dozen or so new pinball manufacturers, including Multimorphic with the P3. If a contract manufacturer (CM) cares which programming language you use, then there's something wrong with the CM. The P-ROC's low level control libraries are written to make it easy on programmers to write their game rules in almost any language they want. We've seen people develop P-ROC games in C/C++, Python, C#, and Java. So far, the open-source, higher-level, pinball frameworks are mostly Python (MPF, pyprocgame-HD, and pyprocgame), likely because they grew (either in code or in concept) from pyprocgame.

    - Gerry
    http://www.pinballcontrollers.com
    http://www.multimorphic.com

    6 months later
    #1600 1 year ago
    Quoted from Aurich:

    ... getting a full on kit, with a basic bottom sounds like a great way to experiment. Your game flips "out of the box", and so you can focus on learning about shot geometry, trying to build ramps, etc. It jumps you right into the game, to the "fun" stuff, and you can start learning what you really want and like quickly.

    For those that really want to experiment with shot layouts and such without having to do any of the foundational work, the P3 will be a great option (available soon). In fact, a good number of P3 pre-orderers have signed up for that exact reason. In addition to having a basic and completely working bottom end, the upper playfield interface was designed to allow people/designers to easily experiment with new shot layouts and concepts. Further, by building a new upper playfield to try out your idea(s), you're not sacrificing that lower end. If it doesn't work out as planned, make another upper playfield and swap it in.

    The P3 also provides functional software (existing games) and a full development kit that handles all of the low level functionality needed to run a game. In that sense, it fully delivers our vision of providing the foundational work for a pinball machine (hardware and software) and allows designers to just "implement the fun stuff" (game specific rules).

    The biggest argument against buying a P3 for developing custom games concepts would be the cost, but you'd also be getting a state of the art platform machine with working, complete games like Lexy Lightspeed, Cannon Lagoon, ROCs, etc, and you can swap those back in when you want to play an existing game instead of working on your custom game. Truth be told, most custom game builder spend more than the price of a P3 developing their custom games, at least those that compare in complexity to modern machines from existing manufacturers. Further, if you develop your game on the P3 and decide you want to sell it commercially, your path to market will be much much easier than building a traditional game, the cost of your game will be significantly less than a traditional game, and you'll already have an installed base of P3 owners who will likely be eager to expand their game libraries by buying your game.

    Ultimately it comes down to how much work you want to do yourself (relative to prototyping, hardware, software, production, marketing, etc). Many want to do absolutely everything themselves, whereas many don't want to do any of the foundational work. We used to offer P-ROC starter kits like Aaron is proposing (though without the connectors and crimps), but the market spoke. We actually had 3 different starter kit variations in an attempt to appeal to designers of machines with different complexities, but most people still opted for custom board combinations and specific power supply specs. Relative to a starter whitewood, based on experience with the majority our customers, a blank playfield with a pre-installed lower end isn't that helpful to new custom machine builders. They still have to route it to install their own mechs, and at that point it's no big deal to include the lower end in the CNC data. Having flippers, trough, and control system pre-installed will actually get in the way initially instead of helping. Testing top-side shot layouts is far less important than most beginner designers seem to think. It's pretty easy to judge flow and shot accessibility with simple 2D drawing tools. Send anybody in the P-ROC forums or slack chat channel a playfield layout, and we'll be able to tell you with almost 100% certainty where your issues will be (not because we have any unique skills. We've just been through the process so many times). It's when you add in the complexity of posts and mechs that require drilling and routing that positional dependencies start to require minor corrections.

    - Gerry
    http://www.pinballcontrollers.com
    http://www.multimorphic.com

    1 week later
    #1645 1 year ago
    Quoted from fastpinball:

    I will sometime load the stranded wire ends with some solder to give it a little more mass to clamp onto.
    Aaron
    FAST Pinball

    If you want a reliable connection, do *not* tin your wire ends going into a screw terminal. The internet is full of reasons why stripped/bare wire is better than tinned for screw terminals.

    - Gerry
    http://www.pinballcontrollers.com
    http://www.multimorphic.com

    2 months later
    #1720 11 months ago
    Quoted from BloodyCactus:

    I like diodes on my coils rather than my pcb's. If you got some reverse junk coming down the line, I'd rather it didnt reach the pcb Im just irrational

    And I'd rather my PCBs are protected just in case the coil diode gets broken or desoldered accidentally.

    IMO, putting flyback protection diodes on the PCBs is a necessity, and putting them on coils is only really helpful if you still have unusually long runs of wires. Even then, it's really only necessary if you're running those wires through areas with digital logic. People using our PD-16 boards do not need diodes on their coils. Like Scott said, those who choose to put diodes on their coils anyway need to be careful about wiring polarities. Wire the coil/diode backwards, and you'll blow both diodes and the transistor. Oh, and the fuses will cry.

    - Gerry
    http://www.multimorphic.com

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    Cabinet - Toppers
    liorillusion
    From: $ 119.99
    Lighting - Backbox
    Rock Custom Pinball
    $ 29.99
    Cabinet - Sound/Speakers
    Lighted Pinball Mods
    From: $ 25.00
    Boards
    German-Pinball-Modular
    $ 26.99
    Lighting - Interactive
    Lee's Parts
    $ 48.00
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    ModFather Pinball Mods
    $ 9.95
    $ 9.99
    Eproms
    Matt's Basement Arcade
    $ 65.00
    $ 22.00
    Cabinet - Sound/Speakers
    ModFather Pinball Mods
    $ 48.00
    Cabinet - Other
    ModFather Pinball Mods
    $ 27.99
    Eproms
    Matt's Basement Arcade
    $ 24.50
    $ 27.99
    Lighting - Interactive
    Lee's Parts
    $ 400.00
    Boards
    Great American Pinball
    $ 26.99
    Lighting - Interactive
    Lee's Parts

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