(Topic ID: 326324)

Less Desirable Game That's Incomplete - What Do You Do With It?

By NeonNoodle

7 days ago


Topic Heartbeat

Topic Stats

  • 14 posts
  • 8 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 7 days ago by Daditude
  • Topic is favorited by 1 Pinsider

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    Topic poll

    “Less Desirable but Incomplete Machine - What Do You Do With It?”

    • Move it along to someone else as a hopeful project. 15 votes
      68%
    • Part it. 3 votes
      14%
    • Darn it, I'm restoring this thing no matter what, at any cost. 4 votes
      18%

    (22 votes)

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    #1 7 days ago

    Was curious about opinions on the ever present question that hits restorers of everything, including pins: What do you do with a less desirable/valuable game that is incomplete but otherwise in decent restorable shape? Say it's missing something significant like a backglass that is difficult, impossible, or expensive to find. What do you do with the machine?

    #2 7 days ago

    Part it out for someone else missing a different piece, and then build your own homebrew with anything that's left?

    #3 7 days ago

    Find someone that will put the love into it since obviously I'm not the guy. We'll it depends on the title too. I have a lot of games in the collection that other people probably don't find desirable for one reason or another. It's owners choice really.

    John

    #4 7 days ago

    If for whatever reason you can't bring it up to 100% , get it into the hands of someone that wants to.
    Someone out there may have better connections for missing parts and also willing to throw too much money at it for whatever reason.
    -Mike

    #5 7 days ago

    Hold onto it for parts. Occasionally I'll come across two junkers and make
    one nice game. One was Sinbad which turned out to be one of my
    faves from the period.

    #6 7 days ago

    Thanks for the input so far. I was leaning towards two ideas already expressed here: I wanted to repurpose the playfield into an illuminated wallhanger, and then save the rest for parts. I have other machines from the same year of production and same manufacturer (Williams) that would certainly have commonality of many parts.

    #7 7 days ago

    I don't mind dumping way more money than a game will be ever worth for the pleasure of restoring it.

    To me it would depend on the specific machine. If there are a lot of them then parting out might be okay if it was really a basket case. But it would always be a last resort. There are fewer & fewer project machines left.

    #8 7 days ago

    It boils down to time versus money, just like anything else.

    Would it be worth the time to source the part and make money off it? Would it be easier to cut bait and sell to someone that desires it more? Would it be valued more for parts?

    P.S. I would be incredibly interested to know the game and missing part(s)

    #9 7 days ago

    For me it is not time versus money. I'd rather spend time and money for the fun and satisfaction of fixing up a project machine than buy one that was already done by someone else.

    There is no way I'm ever going to make back what I put into my most recent restore. It's a hobby, I don't need it to be a money maker.

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    #10 7 days ago

    Pretty much everything can be restored these days with the amount of reproduction parts and fabrication tools available. It basically comes down to how much time and effort you want to put into something.

    #11 7 days ago
    Quoted from dr_nybble:

    For me it is not time versus money. I'd rather spend time and money for the fun and satisfaction of fixing up a project machine than buy one that was already done by someone else.
    There is no way I'm ever going to make back what I put into my most recent restore. It's a hobby, I don't need it to be a money maker.
    [quoted image]
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    Maybe I'm wrong, but I felt the OP was referring to whether or not it was 'worth' it.
    When words like valuable, desirable, and expensive all come into play (as they did in the opening post)...I have to assume that is the case.

    Of course, if anything is a personal pursuit, a certain self satisfaction could be derived...even if you have more into it than it is worth.

    #12 7 days ago
    Quoted from Daditude:

    P.S. I would be incredibly interested to know the game and missing part(s)

    It's a Williams Casanova with missing backglass. And lock down bar, but that's not a problem.

    Quoted from Daditude:

    Maybe I'm wrong, but I felt the OP was referring to whether or not it was 'worth' it.
    When words like valuable, desirable, and expensive all come into play (as they did in the opening post)...I have to assume that is the case.
    Of course, if anything is a personal pursuit, a certain self satisfaction could be derived...even if you have more into it than it is worth.

    It's a bit of both. I don't think this machine is particularly desirable or valuable (despite the unusual bagatelle in the head). If the backglass was there and decent, I wouldn't even think of this as a potential parts machine. I'll put massive time and effort to save a machine and have done it many times in the past, and thoroughly enjoy that part of the hobby, but the question is wider. I've come across other less desirable (often non-big three EM manufacturer) machines that are missing the backglass and no one is reproducing one for the particular machine. What happens to those machines? And, if I could find a backglass for the Casanova and it was $300, would I do it? Not sure.

    #14 7 days ago
    Quoted from NeonNoodle:

    It's a Williams Casanova with missing backglass. And lock down bar, but that's not a problem.

    It's a bit of both. I don't think this machine is particularly desirable or valuable (despite the unusual bagatelle in the head). If the backglass was there and decent, I wouldn't even think of this as a potential parts machine. I'll put massive time and effort to save a machine and have done it many times in the past, and thoroughly enjoy that part of the hobby, but the question is wider. I've come across other less desirable (often non-big three EM manufacturer) machines that are missing the backglass and no one is reproducing one for the particular machine. What happens to those machines? And, if I could find a backglass for the Casanova and it was $300, would I do it? Not sure.

    For me, this would come to whether or not you would play it and enjoy it. I definitely wouldn't put much money into it, because you have almost zero chance of ever getting it back.

    As Dr nybble hinted at...if you just enjoy restoring for the sake of restoration, or if you would enjoy it in your own collection for awhile...I would go for it. If those 2 don't apply, you should punt it.

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