(Topic ID: 202815)

Lacquer for EM cabinet webbing


By pinheadpierre

1 year ago



Topic Stats

  • 35 posts
  • 14 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 1 year ago by DropTarget
  • Topic is favorited by 10 Pinsiders

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    Jungle Head.JPG
    Webbing (resized).JPG
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    #1 1 year ago

    I live in California and therefore cannot drive to a local paint store and get real lacquer for cabinet webbing. What's a guy to do? I believe I can get nitrocellulose lacquer locally. Does anyone have experience using nitrocellulose lacquer for webbing?

    What about stuff that I can buy online. Assuming that the seller will ship it to me, there are numerous options but I really can't tell from the descriptions what kind of lacquers the stuff online is or if it would work for webbing.

    I know I'm not the first to run up against this problem. I really want to learn to do it properly but need good material to work with. What have others done?

    #2 1 year ago

    Don't live in Cali, move to another state?

    #3 1 year ago

    But I don't live in Cali. I live in California!

    #4 1 year ago

    I ended up using Montana webbing. I have an extra can of silver I could sell you

    #5 1 year ago
    Quoted from PinballTilt:

    I ended up using Montana webbing. I have an extra can of silver I could sell you

    Thanks for the offer but I tried Montana webbing. I also tried Krylon. Both are decent products but too thick compared to original stock. I really want to find a source for good lacquer that I could use to shoot out of a gun.

    #6 1 year ago

    I haven't tried it myself but I have seen this recommended: http://www.bohning.com/fletch-lac-gloss-lacquer/

    #7 1 year ago

    Marvin Geisting had a great technique back in the ol’ days of RGP and the fun we had on Team-EM. : ) See if this is of any help.

    https://groups.google.com/forum/m/?hl=en#!topic/rec.games.pinball/Bst2Fp6E2H4

    1 week later
    #8 1 year ago

    Micheals here in Canada sells this stuff, which does a semi decent job: http://www.krylon.ca/products/webbing-spray/

    Maybe they carry it there as well?

    #9 1 year ago
    Quoted from pinheadpierre:

    Thanks for the offer but I tried Montana webbing. I also tried Krylon. Both are decent products but too thick compared to original stock. I really want to find a source for good lacquer that I could use to shoot out of a gun.

    Try the spray can stuff with a cheap touch up gun from Harbor Freight. Thin the product down with lacquer thinner (can you get that?) 1-2 ozsin the gun, add a capful of thinner, stir. Practice in cardboard. Works great. Very thin , random and authentic look.

    #10 1 year ago
    Quoted from stashyboy:

    Try the spray can stuff with a cheap touch up gun from Harbor Freight. Thin the product down with lacquer thinner (can you get that?) 1-2 ozsin the gun, add a capful of thinner, stir. Practice in cardboard. Works great. Very thin , random and authentic look.

    I'm going to try this on my next one. I've got all that stuff minus the siphon feed touch up gun which is cheap at harbor freight.

    5 months later
    #11 1 year ago
    Quoted from stashyboy:

    Try the spray can stuff with a cheap touch up gun from Harbor Freight. Thin the product down with lacquer thinner (can you get that?) 1-2 ozsin the gun, add a capful of thinner, stir. Practice in cardboard. Works great. Very thin , random and authentic look.

    So what do you do? Buy the Krylon spray, empty the propellant, cut open the spray can and use the liquid in a siphon gun?

    #12 1 year ago
    Quoted from JethroP:

    So what do you do? Buy the Krylon spray, empty the propellant, cut open the spray can and use the liquid in a siphon gun?

    no you do the obvious, spray the can into the gun.

    #13 1 year ago

    Are you kidding? Is that obvious? Have you actually tried this?

    #14 1 year ago
    Quoted from JethroP:

    Are you kidding? Is that obvious? Have you actually tried this?

    not for webbing but for other things yes.. google "decant spray paint" for pages of ways and means to do it,

    1 month later
    #15 1 year ago

    Bill Herschel Auto (www.HirschAuto.com) sells nitrocellulose lacquer for antique cars.

    #16 1 year ago

    Just realized that I never followed up on this. I tried the method of unloading a rattle can of webbing into a siphon feed touch up gun. It took a bit of fiddling with gun and pressure adjustment but ultimately worked great. I highly recommend this method.

    20180623_112931 (resized).jpg
    #17 1 year ago
    Quoted from pinheadpierre:

    Just realized that I never followed up on this. I tried the method of unloading a rattle can of webbing into a siphon feed touch up gun. It took a bit of fiddling with gun and pressure adjustment but ultimately worked great. I highly recommend this method.

    What webbing did you use?

    #18 1 year ago
    Quoted from zacaj:

    What webbing did you use?

    Krylon. I diluted approximately 1 oz of webbing with 1/4 oz lacquer thinner.

    20180623_122156 (resized).jpg
    #19 1 year ago

    I was very pleased with my final results too....

    IMG_7867 (resized).JPGimage (resized).jpg
    4 weeks later
    #20 1 year ago
    Quoted from JethroP:

    I was very pleased with my final results too....

    Nice,

    Which method and paint did you use?

    #21 1 year ago
    Quoted from DropTarget:

    Nice,
    Which method and paint did you use?

    I emptied a spray can of krylon black webbing into a jar, mixed it with lacquer thinner, then sprayed with siphon spray gun. Played with the pressures and paint flow adjustment for a minute or two on paper for practice, then shot the entire cabinet and head box in about 1 minute.

    #22 1 year ago
    Quoted from JethroP:

    I emptied a spray can of krylon black webbing into a jar, mixed it with lacquer thinner, then sprayed with siphon spray gun. Played with the pressures and paint flow adjustment for a minute or two on paper for practice, then shot the entire cabinet and head box in about 1 minute.

    thank you, I tried that using Montana brand webbing, but it was a total failure. I used mineral spirits instead of lacquer thinner, could that be the reason?

    btw. my resistors and SMDs just arrived.

    #23 1 year ago
    Quoted from DropTarget:

    thank you, I tried that using Montana brand webbing, but it was a total failure. I used mineral spirits instead of lacquer thinner, could that be the reason?
    btw. my resistors and SMDs just arrived.

    I'm not sure why your paint failed. Not sure what Montana is. Not sure what mineral spirits would do to the mix. I've never heard of trying that. I'm jonesing for a new project, preferably an older EM.

    #24 1 year ago

    lac thinner...

    20180722_110046_resized (resized).jpg
    #25 1 year ago

    Montana is a brand of high end spray paints.

    I just ordered some Krylon Marbelizing spray cans, I'll experiment again when they arrive.

    The issue I foresee is that I plan on using oil based paints for the cabinet and don't know if using the spray webbing cut with lac thinner will react poorly with the base coat. I guess I'll try it on a scrap piece of wood 1st.

    Worse comes to worse, I'll use acrylic spray paint for the base coat and colors instead, but would prefer not to. The oil base (benjamin moore impervo) goes on like a dream ands self levels, no sanding required, comes out like factory. Plus I've already spent $75.00 on them.

    Very nice Pinhead. about how much did you guys thin the webbing spray, I've seen people say they use as much as 1 and as little as 1:4

    I'm also hoping that my touch up gun will work for the job.

    Thanks again.

    #26 1 year ago
    Quoted from JethroP:

    I'm jonesing for a new project, preferably an older EM.

    patience! They always come around.

    #27 1 year ago

    I don't think you will have any problems with the oil based paints, either as a base coat or top coat. Generally, you can paint oil based paints over lacquer, but can't paint lacquer over oil based paints. But you will be applying a very small amount of paint (the webs) thinned with a very small amount of lacquer thinner. In order to do one machine (cabinet and head), you will not even use 1/4 of a can of the Krylon Marbellizing paint. I think I thinned my paint with about equal parts of thinner....won't hurt to thin less, but may not siphon out of the gun if too thick. Not sure about using a HVLP gun. I didn't try that. Crank up the pressure to about 40-60 psi and practice on some scrap. Really it's easy. Play with the mixture flow adjustment and practice moving the gun fast enough to spread out the "wisps" of paint.

    #28 1 year ago

    Thanks,

    I picked up some more of the Montana brand webbing (marble effect) and am experimenting. It's almost perfect right out of the can, although a bit difficult to get consistently thin webs. It seems to be adhering to the oil paints. For the next attempt, I'll thin it with lacquer thinner and spray. Now if it would only stop raining here.

    #29 1 year ago

    I used Montana webbing and was happy with it.
    Just make sure you practice on cardboard or something first.
    You REALLY have to keep the can moving to get thin webs. (like a karate move)
    Webbing (resized).JPG

    I brushed on two coats of Minwax Polycrylic after the stencil work.

    Good Luck !

    Jungle Head.JPG
    #30 1 year ago

    Those Montana webs are interesting. I opted for the smaller, more subtle webs, hence the thinning with lacquer thinner. And I agree, keeps moving the gun like karate chops!

    IMG_7867 (resized).jpg

    #31 1 year ago
    Quoted from Budwin:

    I used Montana webbing and was happy with it.
    Just make sure you practice on cardboard or something first.
    You REALLY have to keep the can moving to get thin webs. (like a karate move)

    Thank you,

    I've used the Montana before as well, and was pleased. For this one I want smaller webbing, I experimented thinning and spraying it yesterday. Seems to work, I just have to dial in the settings.

    #32 1 year ago

    Agreed - Montana or Krylon can be used straight out of the can if you don't mind a heavier than factory web. Thinning it is key to a lighter, more subtle web like the original. Distance from the surface is also an important factor when karate chopping. You're basically tossing strings of paint through the air.

    #33 1 year ago

    I might add that I brushed a coat of water based satin polycyclic over the entire cabinet and head after the webs dried to prevent them from lifting when I did the stenciled top coats. Any clear should do, I just happened to have some of that clear satin from another project I did.

    #34 1 year ago

    I generally put it on a little thick expecting that a bunch will come off. I do a light sand of the webbing to remove the ridges so the art paint wont be ridged as well. And I occasionally will sand an area of a color cut out just before I spray to try to smooth it out.

    But yea, trial and error and practice. Keep gun moving. I usually start the gun off surface, wait for the first webbing to come out then start moving across the surface.

    Some rgp'er had given me the technique about 10 years ago (reshooting it in the touchup sprayer) and it has worked well for me. During my first BankaBall kept wondering where the hell I was going to get blue webbing then the lightbulb goes off to cut silver webbing with blue spray paint... Ive actually mixed black webbing with silver webbing and gotten a lighter black etc.

    Time to go paint some more art on my 4th Ks&Qs restore.

    #35 1 year ago
    Quoted from JethroP:

    I might add that I brushed a coat of water based satin polycyclic over the entire cabinet and head after the webs dried to prevent them from lifting when I did the stenciled top coats. Any clear should do, I just happened to have some of that clear satin from another project I did.

    Good idea, I was planning on doing the webbing while the base coat was still tacky.

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