(Topic ID: 108582)

Keeping track of parts when disassembling playfield?


By shaub

5 years ago



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  • 54 posts
  • 38 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 5 years ago by superJackpot
  • Topic is favorited by 4 Pinsiders

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    #1 5 years ago

    Does anyone have any tips for managing all the parts/nuts/bolts/screws, etc. when disassembling a playfield?

    I'd really like to clean and wax the playfield but I'm a touch worried about mismanaging some of the pieces.

    #2 5 years ago

    I disassemble next to my pool table. When I take something off, I lay it on the pool table as if the entire table was the playfield and I position it where it goes. I put the nuts and bolts along with the piece that they held. Then, I tumble and clean stuff section by section. This gives me a limited little puzzle to solve for each area during re-assembly. Pictures obviously help.

    #3 5 years ago

    Pictures and notes along the way as you disassemble. Especially odd parts/locations. Helps get right posts and what not where they belong.

    Get a tray with 6 or 8 compartments. Start at the front and put in one compartment and advance as you work your way back. Helps you know what screws and bolts go in which area.

    LTG : )™

    #4 5 years ago

    Rule#1 Don't be cocky and tell yourself....yeah I'll remember this goes there.
    Rule#2 Get the manual
    Rule#3 Pay Attention
    Rule#4 Take your time.

    With that said. What I usually do before any teardown is to photograph the game from a million angles before taking one thing off. I do the same thing for inside the backbox and make sure you take picture with the ribbons on and off. Sometimes the ribbons block some conenctors and you can't tell which one goes where. With time you won't need to but for starters make sure you have good shots.

    Next up Take the part out and take a picture of it assemble on many angles if you have to. Take the piece apart and photograph all the pieces neatly laid out.

    Now here comes the part if you are comfortable of not. You can either ziploc the parts of one mech all together or split it up in categories like washers, nuts, bolts, springs etc and then rely on the book to reassemble or once you have labelled everything and put every mech in their individual bag is to go bag by bag and clean part by part.

    I've learned from my mistakes and what I have done now is that I put all the screws, nuts, springs, items that are the same for the entire machine together and label them properly (all the 10-120 springs are together. You'll kick your own ass at reassembly trying to figure out if that is the right spring. I do it this way because it's easy to put a whole bunch of stuff in the tumbler at once. So when I am ready to tumble I put 10-120 springs and let's say hex bolts togther..that way I don't get confused has to which spring it is that I am pulling out of the tumbler. In other words i don't put two of the same things in the tumbler at the same time. So washers x will not go in with washer y.

    And do yourself a favour and get Blitz tumbling media and so high grit medium...so small grit takes forever to make a part shinny.

    #5 5 years ago

    I disassemble in sections of the PF, and into ziplock bags. Every ziplock gets an inventory - quantity and part type (screw, washer, coil, etc). Photos, lots of photos.

    Then I dump as much into the tumbler as space will allow. When all shiny, open up the ziplocks, make the inventory match the bag - re-assemble from the bag(s). Reference photos as needed.

    #6 5 years ago

    Throw everything in a box next to you. When ready to reassemble shake the box well, dump out parts on the floor, assemble. It will make you a pro!

    #7 5 years ago
    Quoted from shaub:

    Does anyone have any tips for managing all the parts/nuts/bolts/screws, etc. when disassembling a playfield?
    I'd really like to clean and wax the playfield but I'm a touch worried about mismanaging some of the pieces.

    Solo cups, a sharpie, and a video camera. Work in logical sections.. like a sling shot, a corner of the playfield, a ramp assembly, etc.

    1. Take video of the area before you take anything apart, point out things to yourself, talk to yourself, look all around.. get the close up and overall view of the area (there is always something you don't call out you'll need later)
    2. Take apart the assembly noting any hardware that is unique (IE the longer screws go here, the shorter ones there, the orientation of a guide, where the wires were routed, etc...)
    3. Take a short video of the area after you are done telling yourself the notes you will need to reassemble it.. Example: the stacking order of pieces on a common post.. which screws went where.. what order you had to take things off in, etc
    4. Put all the pieces for that assembly into a solo cup, and write on the side of the cup with the sharpie what area its from

    Repeat for next area.

    People talk about pictures... but I find with pictures you either spend too much time trying to convey ideas by laying things out, etc.. or you lack the detail or tidbit you can't remember. With video, simply TELL YOURSELF what you saw and what you know will be tricky later. You get the best of both worlds, all the images AND someone telling you what you are looking at.

    With digital video now, its so easy to just hop back and forth over a segment, jump to next, etc. I just use a digital camcorder.. and I watch the playback right on the device. Because I tell myself what I'm looking at, I've never had to worry about zooming in to see something, etc.

    Usually the times I hunt, is when I forget to video something and I play the other segments trying to pick stuff out in the background, etc

    Just work slowly, keep your parts into reasonable sized groups, and have your own notes (videos or pictures, or written notes) and you'll be fine.

    Don't be shy on labeling harnesses or wires! Most modern games have harnesses that are hard to screw up, but not always.. and if you have to desolder stuff to get something out, the labels or notes will be a god send.

    #8 5 years ago

    Good advice so far (except for the all-the-parts-on-the-floor suggestion, lol). If this is your first time disassembling a pin (and especially if you have limited time, space, etc and don't want your game out of commission for months), I would recommend a topside teardown only.

    If you want to go with a full teardown, Godspeed! Labeled bags are good and a MILLION pictures (same areas multiple times from different angles). Some people even recommend video as you teardown. The biggest challenge for me 1st time I did this was matching up screws of different sizes to the proper locations, which is why I like the labeled bag approach (less chance to mix them up). To make things trickier, you may notice inappropriately placed screws where operators worked on a game in the past.

    #9 5 years ago
    Quoted from Aeolus7:

    I would recommend a topside teardown only.

    I'd really just like to remove everything from the top so I can clean and wax the playfield.

    -1
    #10 5 years ago

    Keep an accurate log of each step, work from the bottom of the playfield up. I number my steps and work in sections. Take pictures constantly. I use ice cube trays for all screws and washers etc. I number each slot in the tray and in my log note what I did. I lay all plastics on a table in approximate relation to playfield.

    Example:

    Step one. Removed ball guides to flippers, six screws, 2 longest screws were at the top of the guides.

    Then I put all six screws in the first ice cube tray compartment.

    When you put everything back work in REVERSE order.

    #11 5 years ago
    Quoted from Robotoes:

    I disassemble in sections of the PF, and into ziplock bags. Every ziplock gets an inventory - quantity and part type (screw, washer, coil, etc).

    That's what I do, minus the inventory. I save all the different sized Ziploc bags I get from Pinball Life. I put all the parts that go with a ramp/plastic together. I also line up the sections in the order I took them off and reverse the order when I put them back on. This can be helpful for games where taking parts off in a certain order makes things much easier.

    I'd say it's usually pretty obvious where stuff goes unless you're removing all the posts.

    #12 5 years ago

    I bag everything in logical sections (top left, top right, lower left, lower right, etc... more complex machine, more sections) and take pics of those sections, usually in a "semi" disassembled or loose-fit state so you can see where the washers, springs, brackets etc go. Pictures of the final assembled stuff don't do squat for me as most of the 'wtf?' stuff is hidden anyway.

    I also will 'reassmble' sub assemblies to keep fasteners and nuts in their respective places if possible (ie put screws and nuts back onto switches or ramps to trap them there)

    Personally, I would not group all the screws, washers, widgets, etc... together by type but that's just how my mind works. That's more how I build something from scratch, not how I rebuild something after disassembly.

    #13 5 years ago

    I usually start off with intensions like these.

    Quoted from flashinstinct:

    Rule#1 Don't be cocky and tell yourself....yeah I'll remember this goes there.
    Rule#2 Get the manual
    Rule#3 Pay Attention
    Rule#4 Take your time.

    Quoted from Robotoes:

    I disassemble in sections of the PF, and into ziplock bags. Every ziplock gets an inventory - quantity and part type (screw, washer, coil, etc). Photos, lots of photos.
    Then I dump as much into the tumbler as space will allow. When all shiny, open up the ziplocks, make the inventory match the bag - re-assemble from the bag(s). Reference photos as needed.

    But then - I am who I am and end up going this way instead after a little bit. Luckily I'm usually good enough to take a few pics although never enough or the right angle...

    Quoted from jrivelli:

    Throw everything in a box next to you. When ready to reassemble shake the box well, dump out parts on the floor, assemble. It will make you a pro!

    #14 5 years ago

    The video idea is pretty neat!
    What I do is basically what others suggest here. Photos from many angles before and during the mech or ramp or whatever disassembly. Then write down any wire colors etc if you remove them. I number all bags and make a sheet with the number and the detailed info. Take more pics than you think you'll need and have good lighting so the wire colors are captured well. The order things to back will be self explanatory so when reassembling just do your list/bags backwards.

    I feel I want to improve this method in some way. Like to write what screw sizes are used etc but I find the imperial measures somewhat confusing still =) what would save time would be to be able to tumble more things together. Now I just do a couple of the same kind of assys for example bumpers at once.

    Good luck!

    #15 5 years ago

    Interesting to read these pointers.. a question -

    Is the practise of moving parts and components to a large piece of plywood or cardboard to mimic the layout the playfield not used anymore? That's what I did back in the 90's..

    #16 5 years ago

    Coyote, don't know. I was considering it at first but thought it would be too much extra work and it takes up space too. The reason people are not using it today as compared to the 90s might be the ease of using digital cameras? Wouldn't be handy or cheap to have all film rolls developed =)

    #17 5 years ago

    ...so the cardboard method would've been better then.

    #18 5 years ago

    good timing for this thread as I just started taking my BOP apart to restore it.

    I started with the backbox and at this point I took my label maker and made labels for every connector and zip tied them on. For all the parts I'm using zip-lock bags and took about 50 pics of the backbox alone so far. I'm sure I'll botch something anyways though.

    This reminds me, I need a tumbler

    Hopefully this helps the OP and is not a thread hijack. Is this good enough for cleaning small pinball parts? - http://www.harborfreight.com/5-lb-metal-vibrator-tumbler-67617.html

    #19 5 years ago

    85vett good call there using the zip ties to mark connectors. Don't ruin them with a sharpie!

    #20 5 years ago
    Quoted from 85vett:

    good timing for this thread as I just started taking my BOP apart to restore it.
    I started with the backbox and at this point I took my label maker and made labels for every connector and zip tied them on. For all the parts I'm using zip-lock bags and took about 50 pics of the backbox alone so far. I'm sure I'll botch something anyways though.
    This reminds me, I need a tumbler
    Hopefully this helps the OP and is not a thread hijack. Is this good enough for cleaning small pinball parts? - http://www.harborfreight.com/5-lb-metal-vibrator-tumbler-67617.html

    Mine broke after the 3rd day. Been using a Lyman since, but it is not without fault as the big bowl is vented which causes a huge mess. YMMV

    #21 5 years ago

    Yeah, I saw a lot of negative comments in the past about restores that had writing on connectors. Took me a couple of hours to do all the connectors on the backpanel (boards and light panel) but once finished I can just cut them off.

    #22 5 years ago
    Quoted from 85vett:

    Yeah, I saw a lot of negative comments in the past about restores that had writing on connectors. Took me a couple of hours to do all the connectors on the backpanel (boards and light panel) but once finished I can just cut them off.

    Also, once you finish you'll realize that with only a couple exceptions there is only one way to hook those up anyway and you'll never waste time again.

    #23 5 years ago
    Quoted from Coyote:

    Interesting to read these pointers.. a question -
    Is the practise of moving parts and components to a large piece of plywood or cardboard to mimic the layout the playfield not used anymore? That's what I did back in the 90's..

    This is what I do…. Along with lots of pictures.

    #24 5 years ago

    I separate things by assembly. A pop-bumper assembly, a drop target assembly, etc.

    I take photos of the part prior to removal, and after every part that is removed. For every loose part, I then take a photo of it and any screws I removed with it.

    Then, the screws for that assembly go in a ziplock bag, and both the parts and the bagged screws go in a small box. If the assembly has parts on the top and bottom of the playfield, I separate them out a bit more--usually that means additional bags and labels for the screws. If it is a particularly complex assembly, I separate them out further as appropriate.

    This makes disassembly a slow process, but it makes re-assembly a breeze.

    brackets on the playfield
    the brackets and their screws
    disassembled drop target assembly parts in a box. Bags contain screws for the switches, screws/springs for the cage, and screws for the solenoid parts

    #25 5 years ago

    This is how mine generally look. I purchased this one disassembled, only was missing a couple of standoffs. Not bad.DSC03722.JPGDSC03723.JPG

    #26 5 years ago

    Keep in mind:

    Almost anything that has wires from below the playfield disconnects, don't cut the wires, label the connectors on each side with tape and a number or letter, draw a line on each side of connector to easily remember how they plug back together.

    Some games have star posts of different heights, keep track of this if yours does.

    Turn the game OFF When you work on it, even if you are just putting in LEDS. I even unplug for good measure.

    #27 5 years ago

    Everyone will tell you a different way, so you really have to do what you are comfortable with. I have a method that i seem to like, but then again, its what i like. As others said, pictures, pictures, pictures, pictures, pictures, get the idea

    I have 2 foldable tables, they are like 6 foot by 3 foot. I place one on each side of the machine (far enough away so that i can walk between the game and table)

    I then remove "a layer" of things that are layered on top of other items, like ramps, some plastics, etc. And basically lay them out on the table just like they are on the machine, with any bolts, nuts, etc that were required to be moved next to the part that it was removed from. Then i take most of the rest of the stuff off and do the same thing on the other table.

    This usually leaves basically post, and rails (mainly metal parts) and i take a box, and basically draw a very rough sketch of the machine, then as i pull post and screws off, i poke a hole in the box to an somewhat resemble where on the machine it is, this way i know that i put screws where they go, and bolts/spaceers and such all in the general area where it would go.

    this also helps reassemble process as well, because i dont move to the next "table" or such until all the parts from the area you are currently working on. It really sucks to find out that you forgot a post or something and have to remove a ramp assembly again because you forgot something under it

    Lastly, For the few days that i have the machine apart, DO NOT let your kids in the room, 1 minute in the room can cause you hours and hours of extra. My 3 year old "helped" me one day by handing me a handful of parts that he thought daddy was ready for

    #28 5 years ago

    This is what's table looks like after I have taken everything off the top.

    image-362.jpg
    #29 5 years ago

    I would recommend theteardown.com as a reference guide. They have tons of photos of many games during various stages of disassembly. If you can't remember where a particular part goes, you might be able to find the location by checking out their website. Many games are listed but not all games.

    #30 5 years ago

    Pictures...

    And cups...

    Lots of cups.

    HS2.

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    BSD.

    1453493_10152550451348710_5125721223996268881_n.jpg

    Best thing you can do other than LOTS of pictures and cups - don't be afraid. Go in slowly. Take your time.

    I repeat. Take your time. Go in with the mindset that your game may be apart a couple days - maybe the whole weekend. Do not rush yourself no matter how badly you want it back together. Slow is smooth - smooth is fast.

    Do these things, and you'll be ok .

    20141012_020238.jpg

    #31 5 years ago
    Quoted from 85vett:

    Yeah, I saw a lot of negative comments in the past about restores that had writing on connectors. Took me a couple of hours to do all the connectors on the backpanel (boards and light panel) but once finished I can just cut them off.

    Negative in what way? That they are serviceable instead of beauty queens?

    Removing the very labels that help you maintain the game seems asinine and more about showing the game off vs actually playing and owning them.

    #32 5 years ago
    Quoted from Coyote:

    Is the practise of moving parts and components to a large piece of plywood or cardboard to mimic the layout the playfield not used anymore? That's what I did back in the 90's..

    IMO - its just not needed and takes up too much space. With digital video and photos you can recreate any view on-demand.

    I've done it when I had lots of very similar parts that I wanted to ensure I got them on the same exact location (a bunch of rollover switches from an EM) so I just mocked them up in the correct orientation to each other on a small 16"x16" kind of piece of cardboard. But with more experience now, it just seems like extra anal for no gain. Plus you have this big thing you can knock over, things fall off, etc.

    Lots of cups. I can work my games using just a small 3x3 card table and some shelf space. If it doesn't fit in a cup, its usually pretty clear on what it is vs anything else.. with the exception of ball guides. There, usually only one fits anyways

    I can't stress enough the value of simply telling yourself what to do.. record it and you'll never go back to straining over photos or notepads. I can tell myself something in seconds which can take a minute or two to try to document on paper with descriptive terms, etc. On video I simply say "In this assembly there were two lengths of machine screws.. the long ones went here".

    Where it gets more difficult is when you need to do stuff like clean hardware in bulk.. there you'd not want to clean things in small groups so you need to better document the hardware. I just clean stuff by hand.. so its easy to go cup by cup.

    #33 5 years ago

    I have tons of zip lock bags. I take apart one portion and label exactly what it is (left slingshot, top rollover lanes, etc) I also take tons of pics (assembled, partially assembled, and almost completely disassembled). This way, you don't have to do a tear down and rebuild in one sitting, or fear that you will forget something should you stop in the middle and have to finish another day.

    #34 5 years ago
    Quoted from practicalsteve:

    This is what's table looks like after I have taken everything off the top.

    image-362.jpg 476 KB

    Haha. This is awesome.

    #35 5 years ago

    After you get a few under your belt you will soon figure out that you have 20 baggies with the same style of hardware in them . As far as marking the connectors do what ever makes you comfortable . I hate the look for sharpie drawn on every connector so you should use something that wipes of easy .

    I mark nothing and separate less and less with every build, it takes time to get to that point though .

    Here is a example of marking connectors for no good reason.. Pretty sure a blind man could figure out that the two pin don't fit the 15 pin connector .

    IMG_4904.JPG
    #36 5 years ago

    Really depends on your project. If you are doing a Cabinet restore I would would suggest screwing or taping fasteners right back on what you removed it from when it's out.
    This will take a lot of the guess work away when you put it back,and there won't be as many left over.
    Label accurately anything and everything so that when you read it,you understand your own writing completely. Make important notes on a pad if you have to reassemble back in certain order to avoid having to redo a section because you forgot to do something else first.

    Pictures, many many pics, from all angles, Before,during and after your project. You can never have too many.

    #37 5 years ago

    I just tear shit apart and put shit back together.

    #38 5 years ago

    Three bins new shit ,good shit ,bad shit!

    The forth bin is Oh Shit,not sure what this is.

    Taxi 179.jpg
    #39 5 years ago

    As n All of my Pin Shop jobs ,, My other Pins make Great work tables ,, Each Pin has its place to where parts go back on the p/f ..

    Plus when me & S.tastic shop a Pin , we will work till it's Done .. This WCS94 took 18 hrs ..
    we worked 13 hrs Strait and Finished the next morning ..

    #40 5 years ago

    Dont forget to do this when doing a BSD! (BOP in this case)

    DSC08991.JPG

    #41 5 years ago
    Quoted from centerflank:

    Dont forget to do this when doing a BSD! (BOP in this case)

    Such a good idea, using that for sure.

    #42 5 years ago

    In addition to the take lots of pictures and label everything suggestions, when doing an upper PF teardown, I had a thick piece of cardboard placed securely on top of the game next to me and used it to (literally) hold most small parts - posts, screws, guides etc. in their relative positions as I disassembled them. I made notes on the cardboard itself including anything like, for example the location of bulb sockets that would help me position everything back in the right place. It was very useful when staring at the empty PF to have a 'copy' of the game next to me. And while I individually cleaned, polished or regrained metal parts as I put them back, reassembly was extremely easy, especially the top part of the playfield. I found I didn't need the photos nearly as much as on previous teardowns where I didn't take this approach.

    Plastics, habitrails, ramps and other larger parts went onto another flatter surface that kept things from sliding around.

    IMG_0970.JPGIMG_0967.JPG

    #43 5 years ago

    Along with too many pictures, I got one of these:

    image_13741.jpg

    As parts are removed from the play field, the first layer off goes in the top bins, bins 1-5 from top of field to bottom. Next layer into the middle bins etc. I reverse the procedure to rebuild starting with the lowest layer of bins and work my way up.

    #44 5 years ago

    Sometime it would be a crazy project to draw all parts in a 3d software while disassembling and then put everything together. Then you can just hit the button for exploded view and reset it when done =) of course there should be a clickable link on every part that takes you to an online store where you can buy replacements. Not to mention the mouse over function that shows the part number! Would take time but be cool.

    #45 5 years ago

    I just throw all the parts in a tub and if I have to put things together a couple of times to make it right, I do that. Who wants to write a book on stripping down and rebuilding a playfield?

    Oh and I throw all the leftover parts in my "extras" bucket.

    IT's a lot more fun doing things off the cuff. Besides, most of the games I buy have been butchered by hack route technicians and have a ton of wrong hardware and bad fixes. My games are great when I'm done.

    #46 5 years ago
    Quoted from centerflank:

    Dont forget to do this when doing a BSD! (BOP in this case)

    DSC08991.JPG 394 KB

    Centerflank,not sure you measure up.

    #47 5 years ago

    I agree on measuring ALL the risers & standoffs... especially if you separate and tumble them. Some can be so slightly different and critical for ramps etc.

    Also, I take my game manual and copy the page that shows most of the playfield, on one page. I make many copies of this page. I take many notes on it, and reference different parts or special notes pointing to the areas of the copied playfield picts.

    #48 5 years ago

    Staub: I just shopped my TFTC and it was somewhat a pita. Just go slow and think about the ordering of things, like ramps, before you start unscrewing stuff.

    I also found it easier to unscrew some of the ramp's switches from their associated ramp (in order to remove the ramp) instead of undoing all the zip tied wires underneath to access the connectors.

    #49 5 years ago
    Quoted from superJackpot:

    In addition to the take lots of pictures and label everything suggestions, when doing an upper PF teardown, I had a thick piece of cardboard placed securely on top of the game next to me and used it to (literally) hold most small parts - posts, screws, guides etc. in their relative positions as I disassembled them. I made notes on the cardboard itself including anything like, for example the location of bulb sockets that would help me position everything back in the right place. It was very useful when staring at the empty PF to have a 'copy' of the game next to me. And while I individually cleaned, polished or regrained metal parts as I put them back, reassembly was extremely easy, especially the top part of the playfield. I found I didn't need the photos nearly as much as on previous teardowns where I didn't take this approach.
    Plastics, habitrails, ramps and other larger parts went onto another flatter surface that kept things from sliding around.

    IMG_0970.JPG 293 KB

    IMG_0967.JPG 520 KB

    ive done this and now I use rigid insulation instead. same idea though.

    #50 5 years ago

    I divide the PF into six sections: 1) upper left, 2)upper right, 3)mid left, etc to 6)lower right. Take pics of each section in order from various angles. Store the parts in labeled/numbered zip lock bags. Found this method easier and takes less space than laying them out as they come off. For a PF swap I leave the posts on until I am ready to move them to the new PF. I use an iPad for pic reference when/if I need to reference them.

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