(Topic ID: 242480)

Jurassic Park for first pinball machine a good idea?


By blkhwks19

4 months ago



Topic Stats

  • 28 posts
  • 20 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 4 months ago by Blackbeard
  • No one calls this topic a favorite

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#1 4 months ago

I found a Jurassic Park (1993) machine for sale at an estate sale this weekend. This would be my first pinball purchase, so:

A) Is this a decent machine as a first purchase for someone just getting into the hobby? Is it fun, challenging, worth it, lame, etc? I haven't had a chance to play much of this table, so not sure what the general consensus is on playability and fun factor.

B) Emailed the organizers to see if they'd divulge price info but assuming they don't, what could I expect to pay for one that works and functions, likely has typical cosmetic wear and tear, no mods?

C) Any advice specifically about purchasing via the estate sale? Never done that before, not quite sure what to expect with crowds, interest, haggling, etc.

Really want to own a machine at some point, but most of my favorites are way out of my price range, so hoping to score a somewhat decent deal on a lesser known table. Figured I'd ask the pros first if it's even worth it, so thanks for taking the time, appreciated!

#2 4 months ago

Definitely a great pin for first purchase only if your willing to dive in a fix a few things. Older machines will require some service. You can probably expect to pay high $2K’s or even $3K for his title. It was one of my first machines but also had a NIB to accompany it.

#3 4 months ago

If fully working Jurassic Park is a great starter pin it has one of the coolest toys in pinball. Rules are decent it's a mode based game. If you can get it for a good price and works i would go for it. The first two pins I ever bought in my collection were the Sega Lost world JP and the Data East Jurassic Park.

#4 4 months ago

Great pinball machine.

Cool modes, (2) different 6 ball multiball modes, shaker motor, T REX, smart missile, new code.. the list goes on.

Just sold mine to fund my grail and miss it already.

#5 4 months ago

You could do worse.

$2500-3500 these days.

#6 4 months ago

Make sure you’re aware of final sales fees at estate sales. Usually there is a percentage on top of your bid that you have to pay. Possibly tax as well?

#7 4 months ago

This is a great game for first game. I had one for years and the whole family enjoyed it.

#8 4 months ago

Estate sales will generally be wayyyy overpriced, especially if it's an actual "estate" sale where the family has hired a company to clear out a house.

I saw a $3000.00 Comet at one a couple weeks ago. Sunday was 50% off day, but $1500.00 was still twice what it was worth. I made an offer, but some of the family members present said if it didnt sell for $1500.00, one of them would take it. Organizers will usually buy whatever doesn't sell for a fixed price to resell wherever at a later time, so they usually dont care if it sells or not at the sale. They will also not care that the batteries have exploded or the flippers need to be rebuilt.

The good news -
#1 Most people don't go to estate sales with thousands of dollars on them - you may be the only legitimate buyer.
#2 Sundays are usually discount days, if it's still there.

#9 4 months ago

Awesome, thanks for the info, glad to hear it's a decent game. Would love to snag this, just don't know if I can go $3k. And it's only listed as a 1 day sale so I'm guessing no discount, unless it sits all day and they really want to unload it. So I'm not expecting to necessarily walk away with it, but I'll at least throw my hat into the ring and see what happens.

#10 4 months ago
Quoted from yuriijos:

Definitely a great pin for first purchase only if your willing to dive in a fix a few things. Older machines will require some service.

Quoted from pinzrfun:

They will also not care that the batteries have exploded or the flippers need to be rebuilt.

I don't mind a little work, but I also don't have any special tools or special knowledge of pinball machines, so it's hard to say what kind of work is reasonable for someone like me and what's maybe a bit too much. Is replacing batteries and rebuilding flippers some of the more common repairs, and are they generally pretty easy/straightforward, or pretty involved/complex?

#11 4 months ago
Quoted from blkhwks19:

I don't mind a little work, but I also don't have any special tools or special knowledge of pinball machines, so it's hard to say what kind of work is reasonable for someone like me and what's maybe a bit too much. Is replacing batteries and rebuilding flippers some of the more common repairs, and are they generally pretty easy/straightforward, or pretty involved/complex?

Replacing the batteries is basic, but fixing damage from battery corrosion not so much. Stuff like rebuilding flippers is fairly simple. JP has one mechanism, the T-Rex, that is pretty complex. But the rest of it isn’t too bad.

#12 4 months ago

JP is great for beginner players to that might come over to play. I stand on the right and hit that Smart Missile for them on ball 3 before they drain. Everyone enjoys a free multiball.

#13 4 months ago

Was my first game, paid $2500 but was only worth $2k at that time market wise but I didn't know any better. Recommend putting the machines right side against a wall to keep the gun from busting your balls!

#14 4 months ago

I would say it’s a good first pin. It’s not too complicated although the T Rex can be a little temperamental. It’s fun to play, simple but with some depth. Gets 100% better with the unofficial 6.0 code. LEDs really set off the playfield, sometimes it can get a little blinding because the game tends to flash at you during certain phases.

As for price around here decent JPs go for around $3200-3500. If you can find one for less than $3000 it’s a good deal unless it needs major work.

#15 4 months ago

Yes, yes and yes! I’ve owned it 3 different times and would own it again. Has great modes and features- T-Rex eating the ball, Raptor kickback, awesome dmd animations, humor, smart missle, shaker motor, etc. Just plain fun to shoot.

#16 4 months ago

Was my first pin and what got me into the hobby. Still have it and still one of the first pins my kids friends gravitate to when they come over.

#17 4 months ago
Quoted from blkhwks19:

I don't mind a little work, but I also don't have any special tools or special knowledge of pinball machines, so it's hard to say what kind of work is reasonable for someone like me and what's maybe a bit too much. Is replacing batteries and rebuilding flippers some of the more common repairs, and are they generally pretty easy/straightforward, or pretty involved/complex?

If you own any pinball machine, you will need to also become a part time pinball repair man. You will need some special tools and to learn and gain some knowledge. You need to consider this part of ownership and part of the hobby (and part of the fun). Luckily you can find lots of support and guidance here. You can expect to need to diagnose problems, fix/replace a lot of mechanical issues, use a pinball manual to identify and order needed parts, do some soldering to repair/replace components. You can get away with not being an electrical engineer if you are willing to remove and ship circuit boards for repair when needed. For example I have learned to fix anything on my machines except board work which I ship out.

Good luck!

Jack

#18 4 months ago

Excellent pinball to get.

#19 4 months ago

OP,

Jurassic park is a great first pin to get, but I would recommend getting one from someplace other than an estate sale, preferably another pinball person if you can. Do not purchase that machine if it is not plugged in and fully functional when you go in to see it, unless it is super cheap. I would recommend that if you see the machine and it's turned on and fully functional, you offer no more than $3,000 for that machine. If it is folded up in a corner in the garage and hasn't been turned on in years, offer $2,000 for that machine. Plan on the estate sale wanting too much money for that machine, and getting the price range off of Ebay. What you want to do is contact the estate sale and offer those prices as given above, and tell them if they don't get the outrageous price they ask that you would be willing to take it off their hands for 2k or 3k depending.

If you have a chance to look at it in person and it cannot be turned on, walk away. If you have a chance to turn it on and it doesn't work, or you open the back box and you see leaking batteries onto the circuit boards, or evidence of it in the past, run.

If it turns on but the TREX doesn't move side to side and up and down, subtract $500 from the offer and plan on 8-10 hours of troubleshooting and parts.

If it turns on but looks like all the rubbers are rotting off, this is a good sign and an easy fix.

I would recommend getting a fully working pin for your first... especially something you can test and play. Replacing bulbs and rubbers is mechanically simple, and you'll do fine. You will do much better if you have a pinsider or someone who has owned the game for a while and operated it explain to you how to do the basics.

Jurassic Park is a great game and probably my favorite of those I've owned (Attack From Mars, Stern Star Trek, World Cup Soccer, Pinbot). It is a great game in a one game lineup and fun to play, modify, and looks cool in the house. I would absolutely recommend getting one, but would make sure it worked if it was your first pin.

I've had mine 3 months and in that time I have had to do some minor soldering to fix the TREX, some troubleshooting to fix the ball trough, replaced all the lights with LEDs (easy) installed a few mods (easy) and replaced the rubbers (easy).

Long story short, get a Jurassic Park, but make sure it's one that is fully working if it is your first pin. It will break slowly over time, but starting from a working game is much easier than starting from scratch.

#20 4 months ago

Yeah I'd have to agree a first-time buyer really has no business getting their game from an estate sale. Just a can of worms on condition. Not to mention the prices tend to go nuts with competitive bidders and up to and beyond 25 percent tacked on fees and taxes.

Better off making a less rash and rushed purchasing decision.

#21 4 months ago
Quoted from sataneatscheese:

OP,
If it turns on but the TREX doesn't move side to side and up and down, subtract $500 from the offer and plan on 8-10 hours of troubleshooting and parts.
.

You lost me here.

#22 4 months ago

Thanks for the great advice guys! I think I'll still go check it out for giggles, but I plan to be very cautious. They are asking around $3k, according to the organizers, but I'd be much more comfortable around $2k (assuming it's all working and only minor replacements need to be made). So I'm fully not expecting to get it, but I want to check it out anyways for R&D, and just my own personal experience looking at and analyzing pins. Gotta start somewhere.

Thanks again for the advice!

#23 4 months ago

Don't do it. Its like asking smokers what is the best brand to smoke. The pinball hobby is an addictive one. One day you think "Having a pinball would be cool." Then you find yourself justifying spending $180 on a stupid 3 inch tall guy who flashes 3 times a game because it looks cool.

Jurrassic Park is a good game. There are plenty of tips here to help you get it going. I will agree that jumping in on an estate sale game is a little scary. If you have decent mechanical skills you can fix playfield issues easily.

Now when it comes to board work, you will need to find a guy you can trust. This is where it helps having friends that also like pinball.

#24 4 months ago

I’d steer clear of the estate sale games. No way you’re going to get a good deal on it and you won’t really get to probably check it out most likely either

#25 4 months ago
Quoted from Blackbeard:

You lost me here.

All I'm saying is that the TREX is notoriously difficult to get working again if it breaks.

#26 4 months ago

It is one of the most complex and cool mechanisms to ever be put in a pin, that’s for sure.

#27 4 months ago

I owned the game and loved it... for a few months. Game kicked my ass, and the "power shed" shot is tough to hit. Would I own it again? Possibly.

If that was the first pin I owned, it might have taken me out of the hobby. I started with NBA Fastbreak - roughly $2500, easy to fix, and enjoyed the simplistic rule set that was integrated with the theme nicely.

Best of luck in your decision.

#28 4 months ago
Quoted from sataneatscheese:

All I'm saying is that the TREX is notoriously difficult to get working again if it breaks.

Honestly it's not that bad to work on. I've worked on FAR worse than Trex. And it certainly didn't cost $500. haha.

I get your point though. All pinball can be a pain in the ass to work on. Fiddle with the JM hand. That's a royal pain.

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