(Topic ID: 209199)

Is this a scam by the buyer? - Buyer Paid!


By PinballBulbs

1 year ago



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  • 67 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 1 year ago by PinballBulbs
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#1 1 year ago

So, I've been thinking this over for a while and i am torn on if the buyer did this with malicious intent or not.

Here's the story. We had a buyer place a good sized order(a bit over $400). We shipped order as normal and all was good. We got a notice of chargeback attempt with the reason "Unathorized purchase / fraudulent charge. This person has ordered from us twice in the past. This was their 3rd order. I looked up this 3rd order and looked the exact same as the first two. We even shipped to the billing address that was used. My thought is there isn't any way someone would steal your card and then ship to your address? Plus, stealing a card and ordering Pinball LEDs seems odd and highly specific.

Anyways, I provided all the details to the financial institution and we lost. So, we are out $400 and all the product shipped. I guess i am wondering if people think this was malicious or a scam by the buyer or maybe he really did lose his card and someone bought $400 of LEDs and shipped to his address? Either way, always a bummer to be a really small business in a small niche community to lose $400 and the subsequent product

#2 1 year ago
Quoted from PinballBulbs:

So, I've been thinking this over for a while and i am torn on if the buyer did this with malicious intent or not.
Here's the story. We had a buyer place a good sized order(a bit over $400). We shipped order as normal and all was good. We got a notice of chargeback attempt with the reason "Unathorized purchase / fraudulent charge. This person has ordered from us twice in the past. This was their 3rd order. I looked up this 3rd order and looked the exact same as the first two. We even shipped to the billing address that was used. My thought is there isn't any way someone would steal your card and then ship to your address? Plus, stealing a card and ordering Pinball LEDs seems odd and highly specific.
Anyways, I provided all the details to the financial institution and we lost. So, we are out $400 and all the product shipped. I guess i am wondering if people think this was malicious or a scam by the buyer or maybe he really did lose his card and someone bought $400 of LEDs and shipped to his address? Either way, always a bummer to be a really small business in a small niche community to lose $400 and the subsequent product

I am sorry. I feel your pain. I own a small business that does a LOT of credit, like 250k per month of low margin goods. We average 15 or so charge backs a year and it is absolutely devastating. We provide all we are asked to, but the bottom line is the issuing bank of the credit card views their customer/card holder as king and always sides with them. It amazes me when a person can issue a charge back for an unauthorized charge, yet the card never left their possession, is not reported stolen, and was proven to be swiped. It is tough.

-1
#3 1 year ago

Maybe it might be a good idea to stop taking payments that can be charged back at the customer's will.

#4 1 year ago

Have you contacted the buyer directly?

I once bought some pinball items and the next day I found a fraudulent charge from a day or two earlier. Fast forward 2 weeks and I find out that the card company cancelled all transactions after the fraudulent charge including my legit purchase. I only found out because I paid with PayPal and they froze my account until I straightend it out.

So while it may be a scam it sounds like it could also b an honest mistake

18
#5 1 year ago
Quoted from o-din:

Maybe it might be a good idea to stop taking payments that can be charged back at the customer's will.

I would think that running any business these days, much less one that is internet based, without taking credit cards, isn't a realistic option.

#6 1 year ago
Quoted from Scorch:

Have you contacted the buyer directly?
I once bought some pinball items and the next day I found a fraudulent charge from a day or two earlier. Fast forward 2 weeks and I find out that the card company cancelled all transactions after the fraudulent charge including my legit purchase. I only found out because I paid with PayPal and they froze my account until I straightend it out.
So while it may be a scam it sounds like it could also b an honest mistake

Agreed, I had my credit card stolen last month and they charged back McDonald’s food I ate, they just took the whole two week time period and wiped it clean, despite that I told them which charges were true and false.

Probably an honest mistake

#7 1 year ago
Quoted from o-din:

Maybe it might be a good idea to stop taking payments that can be charged back at the customer's will.

So, it's our fault theft occurs? That seems like a strange way to look at it.

Quoted from Scorch:

Have you contacted the buyer directly?
I once bought some pinball items and the next day I found a fraudulent charge from a day or two earlier. Fast forward 2 weeks and I find out that the card company cancelled all transactions after the fraudulent charge including my legit purchase. I only found out because I paid with PayPal and they froze my account until I straightend it out.
So while it may be a scam it sounds like it could also b an honest mistake

I did, but haven't heard back yet. However, this case had a coupe of back and forths where the customer had to provide further information as well so I'd imagine as some point he figured out what the item was in question right? Maybe not though.

#8 1 year ago
Quoted from SDTMinSTL:

I am sorry. I feel your pain. I own a small business that does a LOT of credit, like 250k per month of low margin goods. We average 15 or so charge backs a year and it is absolutely devastating. We provide all we are asked to, but the bottom line is the issuing bank of the credit card views their customer/card holder as king and always sides with them. It amazes me when a person can issue a charge back for an unauthorized charge, yet the card never left their possession, is not reported stolen, and was proven to be swiped. It is tough.

Thanks for the kind words. Sucks that happens to you as well that many times a year!

#9 1 year ago

Sorry to hear, James....had a bunch too.

Some got fixed....perhaps youll succeed, as when I had no responses from buyer, I lost.
The ones corrected always had dialogue.

-22
#10 1 year ago
Quoted from PinballBulbs:

So, it's our fault theft occurs? That seems like a strange way to look at it.

I didn't say that.

You are the one that said you are out $400 and there is nothing you can do about it.

I just offered up a solution to prevent it from happening again.

Maybe a better idea might be for you not to advertise how easy it is to rip you off.

13
#11 1 year ago
Quoted from o-din:

I didn't say that.
You are the one that said you are out $400 and there is nothing you can do about it.
I just offered up a solution to prevent it from happening again.
Maybe a better idea might be for you not to advertise how easy it is to rip you off.

I did actually consider that before posting. I opted to trust the pinside folks a bit more than that though. Plus, chargebacks aren't a new scam.

-5
#12 1 year ago

You can't trust anybody, not even relatives.

Money Order is a safe, clean method of payment, and once it's cashed, it's a done deal.

Quoted from tacshose:

I had my credit card stolen last month and they charged back McDonald’s food I ate, they just took the whole two week time period and wiped it clean, despite that I told them which charges were true and false.
Probably an honest mistake

The mistake was using a credit card to pay for food at McDonalds. The more you flash that plastic around, the more it is bound to be compromised. Cash is still king for small in person purchases.

22
#13 1 year ago
Quoted from o-din:

You can't trust anybody, not even relatives.
Money Order is a safe, clean method of payment, and once it's cashed, it's a done deal.

The mistake was using a credit card to pay for food at McDonalds. The more you flash that plastic around, the more it is bound to be compromised. Why anybody uses a credit card for small in person purchases is beyond me.

As a consumer, POINTS, POINTS, POINTS, I get 3X for restaurants etc. I use my credit card everywhere, big small, even vending machines that don’t charge a fee. If it gets stolen, it costs me nothing, they overnight me a new card. It’s paid off every month so why not use it?!?

The only time I pay with cash is if they give me a cash discount

#14 1 year ago
Quoted from o-din:

Why anybody uses a credit card for small in person purchases is beyond me.

My credit card has been compromised via mass hacks, but never locally. As had already been noted, the CC company generally sides with the card holder. If I drop my card on the floor, I cancel it and reverse any actual fraudulent charges. If I drop a twenty on the ground, I'm out $20.
Of course, I strictly use credit cards like a check book(at the end of the month, nothing rolls over to incur a charge), so my monthly statement makes it easy to track purchases and spot fraud.

#15 1 year ago

I would find it strange if the CC company didn't side with the merchant if they have supporting documentation of the order, a copy/record of the shipping label, and a tracking number showing as delivered.

Then again, the last time I had an issue with fraudulent charges, the CC company went through line by line on the phone and asked me to point out which charges were fraudulent and which were legitimate and seemed to take me at my word and reversed the fraudulent charges.

I find it odd that a scammer would buy LED bulbs on someone else's card, of all things. Most of the time, I've heard about more valuable purchases like shoes, clothes, jewelry, plane tickets, or various other store items someone could potentially be turned into cash by return without needing a receipt or just pawning it.

#16 1 year ago

My card info was stolen recently. They charged over $300 of stuff to it and shipped the stuff to my house. I’ve never seen anything like it.

Called the company that the products came from. They said they’ve been getting all kinds of calls about orders being fraudulent. I returned the items and did a chargeback.

I still don’t get what the thief was trying to do in my case. Just cause trouble?

#17 1 year ago
Quoted from PinballBulbs:

ere's the story. We had a buyer place a good sized order(a bit over $400). We shipped order as normal and all was good. We got a notice of chargeback attempt with the reason "Unathorized purchase / fraudulent charge. This person has ordered from us twice in the past. This was their 3rd order. I looked up this 3rd order and looked the exact same as the first two. We even shipped to the billing address that was used. My thought is there isn't any way someone would steal your card and then ship to your address? Plus, stealing a card and ordering Pinball LEDs seems odd and highly specific.

It stinks that you got stung but thanks for sharing - you're helping us other small businesses understand the risk and adopt best practices. How long after the order came in did the chargeback contact come in? Asking because I'm curious if it would make sense to hold large orders for a day or two just to reduce the risk. I get that larger order equals better customer and no business owner wants to delay service. Who do you process credit cards through? PayPal/Square/etc. Asking because I'm curious if some solutions are less vulnerable than others. When I stood up my most recent Kickstarter they had a few extra steps compared to last time that was all about chargebacks - clearly they've had issues and are putting in place solid pathways to pass them through to the campaign owners.

Also appreciate info like that from chuckwurt - with all fraud somebody crooked somewhere is doing it; it's a whole lot harder to avoid if we can't even understand what drives the theft mechanism.

For what its worth, if there was a poll on this thread my answer to your subject question is "Yes". They may not have gone into the transaction with that intent (ref. the discussion about lost card and "blanking out a time window") but if they are taking advantage of that to keep the product and are telling the bank they didn't get product, that is dishonest. They'd be on my 'cancel future orders from...' list.

-Rob
-check out my Kickstarter at https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/2111218102/skee-ball-display-pcbs-redesigned?ref=e36051
-visit http://www.kahr.us to get my daughterboard that helps fix WPC pinball resets or for my Williams system 3-7 sound board potentiometer solutions

#18 1 year ago

If you own a small business as I do and worry about big orders being charged back, or any order for that matter... you need to go to your bank and open a second account under your business account so you can transfer the funds from one to the other. It is more trouble to have to transfer funds between accounts, but they won't be able to charge back and get any money from you if there is nothing in the account.

18
#19 1 year ago

If the customer doesn’t respond to your inquiry about the bulbs being a screw up with the card company, and they don’t pay for them, even though the bulbs have been delivered to their address.

Then I’d consider outing them here. Pinball is a relatively small group of people. If they truly scammed you and they have no interest in making it right. Then post their name so that other pinball companies dont do business with them either. Do your best to make sure they don’t rip anyone else off.

There must be a way to black list a person that scams the community. But first be sure that it was a scam and not a mistake.

#20 1 year ago
Quoted from APOLLO_13:

If you own a small business as I do and worry about big orders being charged back, or any order for that matter... you need to go to your bank and open a second account under your business account so you can transfer the funds from one to the other. It is more trouble to have to transfer funds between accounts, but they won't be able to charge back and get any money from you if there is nothing in the account.

How does this protect any CC transactions? They will just hold future money to cover the chargeback.

#21 1 year ago
Quoted from Black_Knight:

How does this protect any CC transactions? They will just hold future money to cover the chargeback.

your not going to beat every fraud, this is just what I do and it's one more way to maybe make things harder for people to steal from you... the suggestion wasn't meant to be a fix all for every problem.

#22 1 year ago
Quoted from PinballBulbs:

....or maybe he really did lose his card and someone bought $400 of LEDs and shipped to his address?

Just reading how ridiculous that sounds, I'm sure you know the answer already.

#23 1 year ago
Quoted from ForceFlow:

I would find it strange if the CC company didn't side with the merchant if they have supporting documentation of the order, a copy/record of the shipping label, and a tracking number showing as delivered.

Unless there is a signature confirmation, the merchant is screwed.

And unless the signature confirmation shows the name of the cardholder, in most cases, the merchant is screwed.

#24 1 year ago

There is too much of this going around. If the buyer does not respond to you with a full explanation of what happened then go down to small claims court and have him served. The crime was committed in your jurisdiction so just file it in your local circuit court. The fact that this was delivered to his address and is a similar order is very suspicious. The burden would definitely be on him to prove this was a string of extraordinary coincidences.

#25 1 year ago

I've had my credit hacked twice in the past couple years. Once there was a flurry of local purchases, the other time there was a long list of domain names purchased, and of online tax preparation forms filed. Both times I got on the phone with the credit card company and they asked me line by line which purchases were legit mine, and which were fraud. I save all my credit receipts, so it was a pretty easy task on my end.

It could be that the buyer in this case went through the same recovery process and there was a mistake made when identifying real vs fraud purchases?

#26 1 year ago

If it was a mistake, the “buyer” should offer to return the goods. If not, then he’s a scammer and needs to be outed.

#27 1 year ago

I've had plenty of unauthorized purchases on my cc. It's disgusting how easy it is for that to happen. Sometimes it's really hard to tell if a charge was legit if I had a lot of different charges or was traveling. I've always been able to work things out with the bank but do feel bad for the merchants. I assume they are the ones that are really getting scammed.

I would try to contact the customer and get their story. It doesn't add up if they had purchased before and then had someone steal the card making the same order. If I had to guess, I would say the customer is a bit scattered brain. Maybe they forgot they ordered before, ordered again, and then forgot they ordered again. When they got the same order twice, they thought it was your fault for processing the order twice.

#28 1 year ago

Best fraudulent use of my card was someone placing a £500 bet on my card at an online betting site -- and winnings going back onto my card! Credit card company detected the fraudulent use but it ended up being pretty much a wash as they won back what they bet.

Not sure what a small merchant can do to avoid this - maybe confirming large orders directly with the customer? My local Chinese takeout place does it!

#29 1 year ago
Quoted from dr_nybble:

Not sure what a small merchant can do to avoid this - maybe confirming large orders directly with the customer? My local Chinese takeout place does it!

This sounds like a great idea to look into for future orders. Maybe a personal e-mail (not just a generic purchasing email) to them confirming the order as well as a phone call. That way you have it in writing and they can't say someone hacked their email account if you talked to them. It still amazes me how many scumbags are out there. Good luck figuring this one out and future transactions.

I'm also in the group that says out this person (if he is a pinsider and we would know his username) if he does not get back to you to discuss the situation.

#30 1 year ago
Quoted from chuckwurt:

My card info was stolen recently. They charged over $300 of stuff to it and shipped the stuff to my house. I’ve never seen anything like it.
Called the company that the products came from. They said they’ve been getting all kinds of calls about orders being fraudulent. I returned the items and did a chargeback.
I still don’t get what the thief was trying to do in my case. Just cause trouble?

I had the same thing happen to me just before Xmas. My CC info was stolen and they order over $2k of stuff from various stores and it was all shipped to my home (or billing address of the CC). Also signed up for some online classes. This is the latest scam. I was told the thieves would steal the packages from our house upon delivery. And they would have all that info since they would have been provided tracking numbers. I spent a lot of time with my CC company and the vendors (getting RMAs and sending stuff back). The most bizarre thing about it was my CC company flagged the scam as soon as it happened but still let most of the charges thru. Then I had to dispute the charges later. How does that make sense, they know the charges are fraudulent but let them thru anyway???

#31 1 year ago
Quoted from Turtle:

How does that make sense, they know the charges are fraudulent but let them thru anyway???

#32 1 year ago

I think the fact that the buyer hasn't responded to you tells me he is scamming you. If this happened to me, I would certainly respond to the vendor and be extremely apologetic about it as I would want to continue doing business with them.

I say publish his name for all to see if he doesn't respond.

#33 1 year ago
Quoted from pipes:

Just reading how ridiculous that sounds, I'm sure you know the answer already.

I did have my opinions on it and I believe it had to be some sort of lame scam. However, some guys brought up some interesting points about maybe being an accident so I've reached out to the buyer.

Robin was kind enough and actually contacted me to see if we can determine if this is a pinsider and go from there. I am giving him a few more days to respond though before anything else is decided such as outing him etc.

#34 1 year ago
Quoted from PinballBulbs:

I did have my opinions on it and I believe it had to be some sort of lame scam. However, some guys brought up some interesting points about maybe being an accident so I've reached out to the buyer.
Robin was kind enough and actually contacted me to see if we can determine if this is a pinsider and go from there. I am giving him a few more days to respond though before anything else is decided such as outing him etc.

Certainly give the buyer time to make it right before you out them, especially if the line of communication was just started. Hopefully you both can get this resolved and it was an honest mistake (those things do still happen every once in a while).

#35 1 year ago

Maybe it will help to modify how you look at the loss.

You are not out the product AND the $400, it's either/or. If you had gotten the $400, you would not be "out" the product, right? If you still had/hadn't sold the product, you're not "out" $400.

Don't make yourself feel twice as bad by telling yourself you lost both!

You could ameliorate further by realizing you're really only out your cost on the product and some postage.

As for the "scam" it sounds to me like some kind of bug where his previous order is being resubmitted unintentionally, as you said they're exactly the same. If that's the case then from his end he would see it as you scamming him!

#36 1 year ago
Quoted from PinballBulbs:

I did have my opinions on it and I believe it had to be some sort of lame scam. However, some guys brought up some interesting points about maybe being an accident so I've reached out to the buyer.
Robin was kind enough and actually contacted me to see if we can determine if this is a pinsider and go from there. I am giving him a few more days to respond though before anything else is decided such as outing him etc.

If you're an honest person and received a package like that by "accident", I'd think the first course of action would be to contact you and arrange to have it shipped back. Assuming you have tracking for the package, how long has it been since it was delivered?

-5
#37 1 year ago
Quoted from DanQverymuch:

Maybe it will help to modify how you look at the loss.
You are not out the product AND the $400, it's either/or. If you had gotten the $400, you would not be "out" the product, right? If you still had/hadn't sold the product, you're not "out" $400.
Don't make yourself feel twice as bad by telling yourself you lost both!
You could ameliorate further by realizing you're really only out your cost on the product and some postage.
As for the "scam" it sounds to me like some kind of bug where his previous order is being resubmitted unintentionally, as you said they're exactly the same. If that's the case then from his end he would see it as you scamming him!

Right, he is actually just out the cost of the product which is probably like half.....So $200?

#38 1 year ago
Quoted from DanQverymuch:

Maybe it will help to modify how you look at the loss.
You are not out the product AND the $400, it's either/or. If you had gotten the $400, you would not be "out" the product, right? If you still had/hadn't sold the product, you're not "out" $400.
Don't make yourself feel twice as bad by telling yourself you lost both!
You could ameliorate further by realizing you're really only out your cost on the product and some postage.
As for the "scam" it sounds to me like some kind of bug where his previous order is being resubmitted unintentionally, as you said they're exactly the same. If that's the case then from his end he would see it as you scamming him!

Sorry, by exact same I meant name on order, billing address all of that etc. It was a different product set entirely.

Quoted from pipes:

If you're an honest person and received a package like that by "accident", I'd think the first course of action would be to contact you and arrange to have it shipped back. Assuming you have tracking for the package, how long has it been since it was delivered?

About 3 months ago and it shows delivered.

#39 1 year ago

I had an incident years ago in which someone used my credit card to start a subscription to a frozen food delivery service, but due to a processing error the item (an styrofoam container filled with gross looking frozen food) arrived at my doorstep in MA, with a random address in NYC as the destination on the invoice within the package, that address did not exist).

When I called the company about the fraud, they didn't want to believe anything and it took lots of calls to them and a fraudulent charge claim (changed credit card number, etc) to get them to do anything. The only reason I bring it up is that after credit card company began to process the issue, the company told me that their credut card processor automatically changed the shipping address to be the billing address for orders over a certain amount or if they can't verify the destination address. I found that hard to believe, but maybe that's the issue here?

Honestly, though, I don't buy it. Stealing food is sad, but people need to eat. I don't think anyone needs pinball bulbs.

Is it possible the charge back was issued due to insufficient funds/exceeding max balance.

#40 1 year ago
Quoted from Turtle:

I had the same thing happen to me just before Xmas. My CC info was stolen and they order over $2k of stuff from various stores and it was all shipped to my home (or billing address of the CC). Also signed up for some online classes. This is the latest scam. I was told the thieves would steal the packages from our house upon delivery. And they would have all that info since they would have been provided tracking numbers. I spent a lot of time with my CC company and the vendors (getting RMAs and sending stuff back). The most bizarre thing about it was my CC company flagged the scam as soon as it happened but still let most of the charges thru. Then I had to dispute the charges later. How does that make sense, they know the charges are fraudulent but let them thru anyway???

Just remembered similar kind of similar happening to some friends. Scalpers from overseas bought season tickets to the Astros late in the season. Box office would not sell season tickets to someone out of town knowing they are scalpers. What they would do was find local houses on the market that were vacant. They use this address for the purchase and have the tickets delivered to the house. I assume they have someone come by and grab them right after delivery. Apparently they do this with all the teams that appear to be heading to the playoffs. While my friend's house was vacant, they did not realize that it had a mail slot that dropped mail inside the house. Scalpers still had digital tickets but printed tickets could still be used. It's only a matter of which gets used first.

#41 1 year ago
Quoted from o-din:

You can't trust anybody, not even relatives.
Money Order is a safe, clean method of payment, and once it's cashed, it's a done deal.

The mistake was using a credit card to pay for food at McDonalds. The more you flash that plastic around, the more it is bound to be compromised. Cash is still king for small in person purchases.

You tell us how many internet companies you've done business with because all they do are money orders.

#42 1 year ago
Quoted from APOLLO_13:

If you own a small business as I do and worry about big orders being charged back, or any order for that matter... you need to go to your bank and open a second account under your business account so you can transfer the funds from one to the other. It is more trouble to have to transfer funds between accounts, but they won't be able to charge back and get any money from you if there is nothing in the account.

And what... start a new merchant account every time he gets a chargeback??

This isn't paypal...

#43 1 year ago

On relatively large orders, call the customer to verify the order, thank them for their business and confirm a shipping date. A simple step taken by many merchants, and it also helps build relationships.

#44 1 year ago
Quoted from Monk:

This sounds like a great idea to look into for future orders. Maybe a personal e-mail (not just a generic purchasing email) to them confirming the order as well as a phone call. That way you have it in writing and they can't say someone hacked their email account if you talked to them.

That really doesn't help him with regard to the charge backs tho... maybe in a future civil action, but not with the CC company. The merchant liability is pretty straight forward and well documented by the CC company.

#45 1 year ago
Quoted from lancestorm:

You tell us how many internet companies you've done business with because all they do are money orders.

PBResource also takes checks from people they trust. But they won't take credit cards and bars customers that they don't feel comfortable dealing with.

Keep those thumbs down coming people, if you have the time between dealing with identity theft and those false charges and scams on your credit cards.

#46 1 year ago
Quoted from PinballBulbs:

About 3 months ago and it shows delivered.

Wow, that's quite some time then. I thought you might say a couple of weeks ago. That's way too long to still be waiting for some kind of communication from this person. Sorry to hear about this.

#47 1 year ago

Ah the age of digital money. So convenient but so easy to get screwed.

#48 1 year ago

At three months out the guy is a d-bag. He got the goods, and his money money back and is well aware he screwed you over. Whether it was his intention or not. Don’t do him any favors, out him and let us direct some karma back at him.

#49 1 year ago

Over the years, My small business has been the victim of credit card fraud several times that I did not catch. Lost a couple of thousand total. Been chraged back many times. Of all the chargebacks, I have won them a majority of the time. Mostly people scamming me.

Over the last several years, the increase of online fraudulent orders being placed through my business has been huge. Some weeks I get more fraudulent orders then real ones. I have gotten pretty good at catching them now. There is a pattern to how they operate. My shopping cart stores IP address. I check it with where the order is placed. Then I check to see if the address is a serial address used in fraudulent orders. Then I check to see if address is a mail box place or freight forwarding company.
Also beware of the phone order when customer uses Voip or magic jack. If shipping address and billing address don't match. that is a red flag.
At that point I tell them Western Union cash or Paypal verified with confirmed address.. 100% of the time, legit orders do not have a problem with those requests. I refund all paypal payments that are not verified or confirmed.
I know it is a lot of work, but orders usually are higher dollar.
I know some complain about paypal, but if buyer is verified and confirmed, all you have to do is ship to registered address and ship quality product. Well worth the extra percent they charge.

I had one gentleman that turned out to be from some South American country. Phoned order in. Overall placed several orders. Worth about $1600 bucks. Used several credit cards. Yes, that can be normal in my business. A few weeks later, charge backs started happening. The address was a freight forwarding company specializing in freight out of country. Now here is the weird part. Not every card he used was charged back. So thankfully I did not lose entire order. I called him back... Got the magic jack customer voice mail. I tried to call police, they did not care.

#50 1 year ago
Quoted from o-din:

PBResource also takes checks from people they trust. But they won't take credit cards and bars customers that they don't feel comfortable dealing with.
Keep those thumbs down coming people, if you have the time between dealing with identity theft and those false charges and scams on your credit cards.

Great, you found one example. It is just the cost of doing business today, and businesses need to expect to cover this as part of their end-cost to consumer. You and I are the ones that end up paying for it and a small business should make sure their % profit covers this scenario occurring. It will only increase over the years.

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