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(Topic ID: 276036)

Is this a capacitor?


By Stephan28

60 days ago



Topic Stats

  • 18 posts
  • 11 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 49 days ago by Stephan28
  • Topic is favorited by 2 Pinsiders

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Williams_Switch_Cap.jpg
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#1 60 days ago

Attached to my pop bumper switch on a Flash machine.

Marking is:
22K
+10VDC
7902

What is the replacement part and in a pinch, can I just solder the lead back on to it?

Thanks!

5154F8E7-8328-4269-87C3-0135A167CD3B (resized).jpeg15673505-B39C-4A1C-8D9C-16FC90DCEDBF (resized).jpeg

#2 60 days ago

It is a 22 uF / 10 V electrolytic capacitor. You can try soldering the lead back.

#3 60 days ago

Just be careful not to use excessive heat.

#4 60 days ago
Quoted from Tuukka:

It is a 22 uF

I don't believe that is correct. It would be 22000pf or 22nf or .022 uf

An electrolytic of that age is junk anyhow just replace it.

#5 60 days ago
Quoted from CNKay:

I don't believe that is correct. It would be 22000pf or 22nf or .022 uf

It's 22uF
I don't think I've ever seen an electrolytic capacitor marked in nF or pF values, they're always in uF.

Williams_Switch_Cap.jpg
#6 60 days ago

It's a 22 uf axial leads electrolytic capacitor. I use one rated at either 16 volts or 25 volts as a replacement.

#7 60 days ago

Okay so I guess the K isn't kilo maybe a tolerance rating? Thanks

#8 60 days ago

Based on marking, sleeving and anode termination - that cap appears to be a Kemet T110 series solid tantalum capacitor --> T110B226K010AS. For these capacitors - the "K" indicates a 10% tolerance (standard tolerance for that series cap). Pricey little bugger for how it is used and if it were me - I would replace with simple electrolytic.

If the part isn't burned then odds are the cap is still good.
The lead was originally soldered 'into' the anode tube and resoldering them can be a bugger. And if you do succeed, who knows how long the new solder joint will last.

As Ken said - Can replace with cheaper electrolytic - 22uF axial. For this value of axial, the standard low end voltage on these is now 50V. You can find lower voltage rated parts but the cost difference is negligible (from reseller point of view, the cost difference for these low value caps is less than a penny apiece when comparing a 25V to a 50V part).

#9 60 days ago
Quoted from G-P-E:

Based on marking, sleeving and anode termination - that cap appears to be a Kemet T110 series solid tantalum capacitor --> T110B226K010AS. For these capacitors - the "K" indicates a 10% tolerance (standard tolerance for that series cap). Pricey little bugger for how it is used and if it were me - I would replace with simple electrolytic.
If the part isn't burned then odds are the cap is still good.
The lead was originally soldered 'into' the anode tube and resoldering them can be a bugger. And if you do succeed, who knows how long the new solder joint will last.
As Ken said - Can replace with cheaper electrolytic - 22uF axial. For this value of axial, the standard low end voltage on these is now 50V. You can find lower voltage rated parts but the cost difference is negligible (from reseller point of view, the cost difference for these low value caps is less than a penny apiece when comparing a 25V to a 50V part).

Great info. Thanks!

#10 59 days ago

Closest I could find was:

Siemens
ST513 Series
Sealed Tantalum
22uF, 35V, 10%
Military grade
Axial leads

I think that’ll work. Thoughts?

#11 59 days ago

That’ll work fine.

#12 59 days ago
Quoted from G-P-E:

Based on marking, sleeving and anode termination - that cap appears to be a Kemet T110 series solid tantalum capacitor --> T110B226K010AS. For these capacitors - the "K" indicates a 10% tolerance (standard tolerance for that series cap). Pricey little bugger for how it is used and if it were me - I would replace with simple electrolytic.
If the part isn't burned then odds are the cap is still good.
The lead was originally soldered 'into' the anode tube and resoldering them can be a bugger. And if you do succeed, who knows how long the new solder joint will last.
As Ken said - Can replace with cheaper electrolytic - 22uF axial. For this value of axial, the standard low end voltage on these is now 50V. You can find lower voltage rated parts but the cost difference is negligible (from reseller point of view, the cost difference for these low value caps is less than a penny apiece when comparing a 25V to a 50V part).

Crap, now I’m hearing that the tantalum capacitors are a fire hazard......

#13 59 days ago

Not sure why a tantalum capacitor was used in the first place. Advantages of size and not wearing out like aluminum electrolytic capacitors shouldn't be an issue here. Anyone have an idea if this original or a replacement?

I agree with tuukka it might be worth trying soldering the lead back, there is a fair chance it is still good.

#14 59 days ago
Quoted from ReadyPO:

Not sure why a tantalum capacitor was used in the first place. Advantages of size and not wearing out like aluminum electrolytic capacitors shouldn't be an issue here. Anyone have an idea if this original or a replacement?
I agree with tuukka it might be worth trying soldering the lead back, there is a fair chance it is still good.

I’m thinking they are original since all three pop bumpers have the same exact cap. Unless, at some point, someone changed out all three.

I ordered the replacement tantalum caps as close to the original as I could find. However, since I do t have much to lose, I’ll go ahead and try soldering the lead back on.

Also, anyone know the purpose of these caps? I surmise that it is to give the pop bumpers a little more "pop."

#15 59 days ago
Quoted from Stephan28:

Also, anyone know the purpose of these caps? I surmise that it is to give the pop bumpers a little more "pop."

Works with the resistor to form an RC network so that you get a pulse of known duration to give a good pop.

Without, it's only going to activate the circuit until the switch leaves stop touching. The RC pulse ensures one activation and any bouncing is ignored.

#16 59 days ago
Quoted from Stephan28:

Great info. Thanks!

Yes it was.

1 week later
#17 52 days ago
Quoted from Stephan28:

I’m thinking they are original since all three pop bumpers have the same exact cap. Unless, at some point, someone changed out all three.
I ordered the replacement tantalum caps as close to the original as I could find. However, since I do t have much to lose, I’ll go ahead and try soldering the lead back on.
Also, anyone know the purpose of these caps? I surmise that it is to give the pop bumpers a little more "pop."

Make sure you get the polarity of the new caps in the right orientation when you solder them back in.

#18 49 days ago
Quoted from Schwaggs:

Make sure you get the polarity of the new caps in the right orientation when you solder them back in.

Thanks for the reminder!

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