(Topic ID: 168710)

Is there anyone that can/will repair this board...?


By PinJim83

2 years ago



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  • 13 posts
  • 12 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 2 years ago by dung
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#1 2 years ago

Here is the Williams System 9 CPU out of the Sorcerer I recently picked up. The game boots (after flicking the power on a couple of times with the coin door open) and appears to play normally with the exception of the bell not ringing and some speech ROMS not working. The big issue, which I have mentioned in other threads, is the GI resistors are fried (refer to pics). Is this something that is repairable, or will board repair places simply return my board and wish me luck? Any recommendations on where I can go? I also realize that the back of the board has a number of jumpers. Is that an issue when looking to have the board fixed? Thanks in advance.

In the alternative, any leads on a working System 9 CPU would be greatly appreciated!

-Jim

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#2 2 years ago

What I will say is usually representative of what most electronics techs will tell you. While some may use the term "unrepairable", it does not mean that the board cannot possibly be fixed, the *more correct* statement would be "cannot be repaired economically". A board in this type of condition likely means a lot of labor time, regardless of the cost of parts. A board in such condition also presents a huge risk in terms of reliability.

That's not to say a hobbyist couldn't devote the time to make it run, perhaps using the work to as a means of learning and developing skills. Keep in mind that a severely damaged board can possibly damage other components in a game that you are using to test it with, so you have to be wary of that as well. Personally, I would recommend a replacement board to get the game up and running, and save this board for the working spare components that can be of use in the future.

#3 2 years ago

Resistors are pretty easy to replace as long as the traces have survived. I doubt that'd fix your booting/sound issues, but grab yourself a cheap desoldering tool and replace em. Honestly though, as long as they still test right with an ohm meter, just because they look cooked doesn't mean much. I've seen worse looking resistor sections that still worked just fine

Agree with wayout though, the amount of time it takes to fix boards rarely makes it justifiable if you can replace them. Anything can be 'fixed' with enough time.

#4 2 years ago

Ask pinsider "johnwartjr" if your not up to it,show him the pics and you"ll get a better idea where you stand with that board.He may be able to help.
Mike

#5 2 years ago

Repairable? Yes.

Economically repairable?

That's where the question lies. The description is a little bit vague, which is understandable since you may not be super technical.

Those resistors are on the lamp columns - not the GI. They typically char like that. They make a lot of heat. I end up replacing those on most Sys9 boards, so I'm not surprised.

There's a lot of scary looking repair work on that board. A lot of rework using jumpers. Stuff like that just takes time to ring out and see if things are connected where they should, etc. Somebody who shouldn't have been working on it worked on it, and did some damage. Someone made an attempt to fix it.

If it's a sound/speech problem, the lamp columns, and a transistor or two, it's very repairable. I don't see any battery leakage, which is a plus. A repair like that would probably only be around $100.

If it is worse than it sounds, that's where it gets sketchy. A good used Sys9 board can often be had in the $200 range - but sometimes you have to wait a little while for one to turn up.

It won't ever be 'pretty' - but that's not always a requirement for every board. We don't just throw boards that aren't pretty but work in the trash, especially when spare boards of that type are few and far between.

If you would like me to take a look, feel free to send me a PM and we can discuss specifics.

#6 2 years ago

What John said.

Most boards are repairable. The question is whether or not its worth it. I had a recent experience with this where a friend wanted me to come look at a machine he owns. There were multiple issues with the boards, including a power driver board that badly needed to be re-done (voltages out of whack and dirty) and problems with both the driver and MPU boards.

It would take me a couple of hours *per board* to clean them up, replace the fried stuff, plus replacing the connectors (which were the typical mess at this age.) But for this machine replacement boards *are* available, and they're not very expensive. For basically the same money he can have new, with no faults and new connectors.

Now if it was MY machine I'd fix the boards because I like doing it and of course my labor, for myself, is "free", but if it's YOUR machine and you're paying me to fix the boards it rarely makes any sort of sense to do so, especially when that sort of previous rework is present as well and some of it looks to have been done poorly.

#7 2 years ago

That board reminds me of the outlet scene from A Christmas Story.

Personally I would tackle it if it was my own board because my labor is free for me and in a sick way I kind of enjoy that sort of punishment. I do not think I would try to have someone else fix it, as others have said that doesn't look economical.

#8 2 years ago

What John and Ticker said.
The burned lamp resistors appear that they would be a straightforward fix, as the PCB itself doesn't appear to be badly damaged. BUT the locations where the driver ICs were replaced are a mess. A case of the 'fixes' making the problem worse. Obviously damaged traces because of all of the jumper wires. I wouldn't be surprised if there were some shorts as well. Some ICs soldered from both sides, which would make it a pain to remove them. I'd be curious to see what the PCB looks like under those solder blobs, flux ponds, and jumper wires.

#9 2 years ago

Your better off in the long run getting a new one. It's another thing if you can do the work yourself, because, it will fail again, most likely, that way you did work, you know right where to go look. Not fun, and frustration detail solder work.
Yup, new one is my vote.

#10 2 years ago

Consult with someone like Clive @ Coin Op Cauldron (google it). You could probably send him the board and for a small fee he would check it out and advise on your options.

Jack

#11 2 years ago

Thanks for all of the solid advice. It sounds like a replacement board is the way to go...now I just need to find one at a reasonable price...

#12 2 years ago

Use your old board for practice once you get the new one.

#13 2 years ago
Quoted from MotorCityMatt:

Use your old board for practice once you get the new one.

Or sell your old board off to someone who will repair it. If you want to learn how to do soldering work, use a common board or one that there are replacements.

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