(Topic ID: 218014)

is there a specific time you would want to use inkjet waterslides?


By hocuslocus

1 year ago



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  • Latest reply 1 year ago by hocuslocus
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    #1 1 year ago

    I have an inkjet, but am seeing that LaserJet is the way to go for the waterslide decals. Seems like any relevance I can find as far as inkjet fading issues were back in 2007-2011 post on the net. So maybe inkjet cartridges are better then they used to be?

    If there are still fading issues with inkjet then why would people still use them? (other then they don't have a color LaserJet)

    #2 1 year ago

    They are not waterproof. You need to spray a clear on them and let dry. Then you wet so they can be transferred to the receiving surface. I have had mixed results doing this successfully, say one in three attempts.

    Regarding the fading I have not noticed that.

    #3 1 year ago
    Quoted from SteveinTexas:

    They are not waterproof. You need to spray a clear on them and let dry. Then you wet so they can be transferred to the receiving surface. I have had mixed results doing this successfully, say one in three attempts.
    Regarding the fading I have not noticed that.

    Quoted from hocuslocus:

    I have an inkjet, but am seeing that LaserJet is the way to go for the waterslide decals. Seems like any relevance I can find as far as inkjet fading issues were back in 2007-2011 post on the net. So maybe inkjet cartridges are better then they used to be?
    If there are still fading issues with inkjet then why would people still use them? (other then they don't have a color LaserJet)

    The lack of water resistance is an interesting one. I have thankfully not encountered any moisture resistance issues with my inkjet decals. Fade can take years to notice. Results may vary with your particular combination of decal paper and ink. I shoot epson k3 archival inks from a high end printer simply because I have one. If I did not have that I would get my decals laser printed at a shop.

    #4 1 year ago

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inkjet_printing#Durability

    Durability
    Inkjet documents can have poor to excellent archival durability, depending on the quality of the inks and paper used. If low-quality paper is used, it can yellow and degrade due to residual acid in the untreated pulp; in the worst case, old prints can literally crumble into small particles when handled. High-quality inkjet prints on acid-free paper can last as long as typewritten or handwritten documents on the same paper.

    Because the ink used in many low-cost consumer inkjets is water-soluble, care must be taken with inkjet-printed documents to avoid even the smallest drop of moisture, which can cause severe "blurring" or "running". In extreme cases, even sweaty fingertips during hot humid weather could cause low-quality inks to smear. Similarly, water-based highlighter markers can blur inkjet-printed documents and discolor the highlighter's tip. The lifetime of inkjet prints produced using aqueous inks is generally shorter (although UV-resistant inks are available) than those produced with solvent-based inkjets; however, so-called "archival inks" have been produced for use in aqueous-based machines which offer extended life.

    In addition to smearing, gradual fading of many inks can be a problem over time. Print lifetime is highly dependent on the quality and formulation of the ink. The earliest inkjet printers, intended for home and small office applications, used dye-based inks. Even the best dye-based inks are not as durable as pigment-based inks, which are now available for many inkjet printers. Many inkjet printers now utilize pigment based inks which are highly water resistant: at least the black ink is often pigment-based. Resin or silicone protected photopaper is widely available at low cost, introducing complete water and mechanical rub resistance for dye and pigment inks. The photopaper itself must be designed for pigment or for dye inks, as pigment particles are too large to be able to penetrate through dye-only photopaper protection layer.

    The highest-quality inkjet prints are often called "giclée" prints, to distinguish them from less-durable and lower-cost prints. However, the use of the term is no guarantee of quality, and the inks and paper used must be carefully investigated before an archivist can rely on their long-term durability.

    -----

    Most home inkjet printers are going to use water soluble ink that will run if it gets wet. So keep that in mind.

    #5 1 year ago
    Quoted from barakandl:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inkjet_printing#Durability
    Most home inkjet printers are going to use water soluble ink that will run if it gets wet. So keep that in mind.

    Think I spent the better part of 3 hours going over the different printers, print quality, inks etc...
    A lot more to it then I ever would of imagined. Wasn't aware that name branded ink supposedly gives a higher yield... maybe that's what they want you to think.
    Epson printers seem like they best for this type of application based on the type of inks they use, but the heads clog if you don't use them on regular basis.
    Rather then spend more money on another inkjet, I decided to just go laser.
    I found out real fast why most people don't use laser jet, the ink is almost as expensive as the damn printers.

    #6 1 year ago
    Quoted from hocuslocus:

    Think I spent the better part of 3 hours going over the different printers, print quality, inks etc...
    A lot more to it then I ever would of imagined. Wasn't aware that name branded ink supposedly gives a higher yield... maybe that's what they want you to think.
    Epson printers seem like they best for this type of application based on the type of inks they use, but the heads clog if you don't use them on regular basis.
    Rather then spend more money on another inkjet, I decided to just go laser.
    I found out real fast why most people don't use laser jet, the ink is almost as expensive as the damn printers.

    I use a brother laser printer to print shipping labels. I got it a couple years ago black friday special for like $50. Went through a couple toner carts (used generic brand, was fine except one bad one) and now the imaging drum has a score mark and is just going bad. New drum costs like 3x what I paid for the printer... which came with a drum.

    Printers they give them away probably losing money on sales on the hopes you spend $$$ on the consumables which is where all the profit is.

    #7 1 year ago
    Quoted from hocuslocus:

    is there a specific time you would want to use inkjet waterslides?

    Sunday at 2:35PM.

    #8 1 year ago

    If you are doing black only, such as insert lettering and keylines, then laser is the way to go just because you don't have to worry about sealing the ink. Also in some cases, "black" inkjet ink is actually dark blue like a Sharpie.

    If you are doing any sort of color, the calculus gets more involved. Most color laser printers do not approach the fidelity of inkjets when it comes to blending and dithering for a wide color gamut. Color laser = spot colors for charts, lines, graphs whereas inkjet allows photo dithering. That said, color lasers are way better than they used to be so for some uses including photos, you might not notice a significant difference. So it would depend on the application: not all playfield art is the same. You might be able to get a good color match from a laser; it would probably be far easier to get an exact match from an inkjet. This is noteworthy if you want to print an overlay or something.

    When I did custom model railroad decals, I was able to print extremely complex graphics in exacting color matches with the high-quality inkjet I had at the time. Getting those same results from a color laser would have been impossible. So I had to seal the inkjet decals, but I had good results even though it was a slightly tricky process.

    I have an obsolete ALPS printer which uses water-tight opaque film ribbons, but requires full layer separation for CMYK/RGB color so its color palette is fairly limited. Which is why I usually only do black and/or white with it. I would NOT recommend an Alps for a newbie though. They are wonderful and missed but not for the faint of heart these days.

    #9 1 year ago
    Quoted from goingincirclez:

    I have an obsolete ALPS printer which uses water-tight opaque film ribbons, but requires full layer separation for CMYK/RGB color so its color palette is fairly limited. Which is why I usually only do black and/or white with it. I would NOT recommend an Alps for a newbie though. They are wonderful and missed but not for the faint of heart these days.

    I heard someone mention that the only way to do waterslides on an LaserJet (pretty sure they said laser) was to use one of these ALPS printers. Guess that was a little while ago... maybe the printer or decals paper had been modified to be able to use it in a wider assortment of printers.

    Going to do some experimenting with both and see what works. Always had the feeling that inkjets were a lot closer to the mark when it comes to replicating a photo. Though unless your looking at the game with a magnifying glass are you really going to notice the finer differences? guess I'll find out

    thanks for the info.

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