(Topic ID: 21366)

Is pinball on borrowed time?


By flipperfingers

7 years ago



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  • 44 posts
  • 36 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 7 years ago by FiveSixPyro
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    #1 7 years ago

    I love pinball and have been playing it regularly since I was in high school. I'm 38, so I was lucky enough to "discover" pinball just in time for the 90's Williams/Bally years. Like many of you, once I was settled in a career I had interest in buying one of these games that I loved so much. I've only owned four machines- TZ (twice- the first time in 1999 and I got a beautiful machine for $1500.) Then I started a family, lost interest and sold, and got interested again within the last 5 or so years. I bought TZ again and sold, Tommy and sold, No Good Gofers and sold. As you can see, I'm one of those who is pretty much allowed one machine at a time. I suppose that it is better than no machines.

    Anyway, I figured I'd give a little background since I never posted here before, so back to the topic at hand-- Do any of you feel that despite the uptick in pinball popularity over the last few years that this trend has any chance of carrying on for very long? Unfortunately, I think the answer is a definitive "no" and here's why. I think that my generation, Gen X is it for pinball, and we're now in our 30's and 40's. I am a middle school teacher in a suburban Detroit school district, so I think that I'm qualified to say that I have a finger on the pulse of the current crop of teenagers. And believe me when I tell you that pinball is NOT even in the top 100 of things that they enjoy doing.

    If the topic of hobbies happens to come up and I make mention of the fact I'm into pinball, the kids look at me like I'm a rack of yard tools from Sears (Great Outdoors movie reference...Sorry.) Anyway, once people realize that buying pinball machines is not a retirement plan, like many people seem to think it is, and that the minimum age of prospective buyers in 20 years is near 60, what is going to become of peoples' pinball collections?

    People need to enjoy pinball for the moment and not agonize over it like a classic car. By the way, I also believe that 60's muscle cars will tank once the boomers are too old to care.

    But who knows? I could be completely wrong in my assessment. I'm curious about what other people think. And yes, I am looking for my next one, singular, solitary machine that I'm allowed to have. Thanks.

    #2 7 years ago

    It seems to me that Pinball is enjoyed by adults more than teens or kids. Most kids dont hang out in arcades so much. They have awesome consoles like xbox 360 to entertain them at home. Arcades are more redemption and stuff So the folks now that are able to put pinballs into their homes are generally middle aged or older.

    I do have a 25 year old friend with a 35 pin sized collection. A lot of his friends in early 20's love playing while drinking and partying there. I don't think the game will die. It may never be played massively by kids on locations, but it won't die out. When I have family get togethers, it gets played by kids of all ages. When my kids bring friends over, they always think the arcade room is awesome.

    #3 7 years ago

    We are all borrowed time.

    Time dilation, the laws of thermodynamics & the Federal Reserve make sure of it!

    Yes one day we will look at our fleet of machines like the people of the great Holland tulip collapse did. Until then it will be fun though

    #4 7 years ago

    Worrying about the state of the hobby in 20 years is way overthinking things. The state of the hobby in 5 years is far more worth considering, or even the state in one year.

    The 20-somethings don't know about pinball because they didn't grow up playing pinball - by the time they hit their teen years, even video arcades were nearly extinct, and most likely the few pinballs they ever encountered were already in poor shape.

    The only way that they can learn to appreciate pinball is to have opportunities to be EXPOSED to pinball - and particularly, in good pinball tables that are in good condition. And in order for that to happen, the hobbyists (as a whole, not necessarily individually) need to work on finding ways to make their machines more publicly accessible.

    Right now, there's a resurgence - more companies making more machines (and, hopefully, top-tier machines). If those tables get more public exposure, there's more chance that people will try them, and if they enjoy the experience, they'll seek it out again.

    #5 7 years ago
    Quoted from markmon:

    It seems to me that Pinball is enjoyed by adults more than teens or kids. Most kids dont hang out in arcades so much.

    Yeah and arcases are completely different now....all redemption these days.

    #6 7 years ago
    Quoted from flipperfingers:

    People need to enjoy pinball for the moment and not agonize over it like a classic car.

    I totally agree with this....I enjoy playing my games and yes my kids think I'm a doofus for owning pinball machines.....although they do want to play WOZ whenever it comes...

    It's going to be interesting to see what happens over the next decade or so.....

    #7 7 years ago
    Quoted from markmon:

    It seems to me that Pinball is enjoyed by adults more than teens or kids. Most kids dont hang out in arcades so much. They have awesome consoles like xbox 360 to entertain them at home. Arcades are more redemption and stuff So the folks now that are able to put pinballs into their homes are generally middle aged or older.
    I do have a 25 year old friend with a 35 pin sized collection. A lot of his friends in early 20's love playing while drinking and partying there. I don't think the game will die. It may never be played massively by kids on locations, but it won't die out. When I have family get togethers, it gets played by kids of all ages. When my kids bring friends over, they always think the arcade room is awesome.

    Right. But do you think that those kids will go on to desire their own machines one day? That's really the only way that pinball will have any longevity. It's the nostalgia aspect that makes adults who have a little extra dough want to go out and get their own machines. Of course, new machines don't have the nostalgia component going for them and are certainly purchased nonetheless, but I do think that when they're bought and played for the first time that people are ultimately looking to recapture the excitement of playing a machine for the first time when they were younger.

    #8 7 years ago

    There are many young folks here on Pinside. Also, my college age daughter brings her friends over to play pinball and they have a great time. There's plenty of hope!

    #9 7 years ago

    As long as my pins are fun for me and my family to play, I don't concern myself with anything else. A lack of interest in pins, by the general public, will not lesson my gameroom experience. It may make my pins worth less, in the future, but they weren't going to auction until you pry them from my cold, dead hands.

    Quoted from iceman44:

    my kids think I'm a doofus for owning pinball machines..

    I'm surprised by this, Ice. I got to say, everytime I show kids how to play(doesn't happen often), most of them seem interested. Maybe WOZ will be the game that brings pins back to glory.

    #10 7 years ago

    Long story short, I've been 'in the game' for a LONG time now, and in 20 years I'll still be well under the 60 year age point and hopefully still buying machines, or at least playing what I have. I worked at and managed in two different arcades, as well as working in two locations where arcades were a major part of them.

    Pinball has never, ever been a middle-school aged kid thing. It just hasn't been. It's an older, more adult style thing. From observing at the place that I managed, the average age of someone actually playing our pinball machines was probably 30. Rarely would younger kids stick tokens in them.

    The arcade has died out in large part because the people who owned arcades didn't put their finger on the pulse of the real world. Did you know that Guitar Freaks came out in the arcade in 1998? You got to play a guitar to songs just like Guitar Hero... YEARS before Guitar Hero earned billions of dollars. But, most arcade owners said that Guitar Freaks and other popular games like Dance Dance Revolution were 'too noisy' so they didn't get them. Instead, they got Tekken 4, Tekken Tag Tournament, and so on... which were HUGELY expensive machines that got ported to consoles very quickly.

    You couldn't recreate Guitar Freaks on home consoles, you could absolutely recreate Tekken.

    So because of that, arcades have been dying. The industry could be re-invigorated, but it would really take some vision to do it right now, and that doesn't seem to be around. For pinball in particular, if the machines were made so that bars could hold leagues on them with little input, they could start taking off. I've argued this before - in Wisconsin where I live, bars build indoor volleyball courts to get people inside during the winter so they will drink afterward. That is a HUGE thing for a lot of arcades, but could you imagine if the games self-monitored a tournament, and you could have just about any location set up, say, four games for the tournament? You'd have people in and playing regularly... and buying drinks.

    Pins don't make much, but a lot of locations love them because the players buy drinks and food when they are there. You need the location to figure out how to promote them, and then you can get back in the game.

    Roger Sharpe has told me that they turned down the Batman pinball license because they wanted the machine to be featured on cereal boxes, and when Warner Bros said no, they said then they didn't want to pay that much for the license. When is the last time you've heard of a pinball machine being promoted on anything other than pinball shows? Isn't it about time to branch out?

    Oh yeah... Jersey Jack Pinball went to E3 this year...

    I think there might be hope that it could really stick around beyond just in people's basements.

    #11 7 years ago

    It's all about engaging the up and coming generations through using the technologies that are current to them, social networking to name just one.

    I am still shocked there is no such thing as an "internet connected pin". I would think internet based leaderboards, promotions, etc.. would be a no-brainer for this industry.

    #12 7 years ago

    I agree with your concepts on all things collectable across the board. They have there biggest boom when the kids that played them reach 25-40. Then they all slowly fade the way of the tonka or the baseball card or g.i. joe etc.. I do not see cars being any different either. There is no exception to the rule that I have found except coins. They will always hold some value even if not directly used as currency. Just my opinion.

    #13 7 years ago
    Quoted from Honch:

    I'm surprised by this, Ice. I got to say, everytime I show kids how to play(doesn't happen often), most of them seem interested. Maybe WOZ will be the game that brings pins back to glory.

    When i first got LOTR LE I even had my mom playing and having fun and then for a while after SM came in the kids had fun playing against each other but then a few weeks into SM it was.......crickets......they just laugh at me now!

    I have three girls and pins just don't interest them....I'll have to get creative with tournaments and competition or something...

    #14 7 years ago

    Things change, it'll be interesting to see where and how it goes after this. But to expect it to remain as it is today isn't realistic. Let's just hope that the current companies involved can weather the uncertainties in the market and keep producing great product.

    Maybe in a few years we'll see knockoffs and budget pins coming out of China (shudder), maybe we'll see the price point for US manufactures decrease in an effort to draw in more of the home buyers as opposed to operators (this is where I feel the future is, as pins can't compete with other arcade options). But no matter what happens, it will certainly be different that what we are seeing today, change happens.

    #15 7 years ago

    I'm a Gen X'er and I've been playing pinball since I was a kid. My dad had a gameroom in our basement when I was growing up and now I've got games of my own. Even way back then, I didn't know anyone my age that was into pinball. Shortly after, stand up video games got popular, and then the game consoles came out.

    I know there's a lot of people on this forum in my age group that are really into pinball, but in the grand scheme of things we are a huge minority. There are enough enthusiast out there to support a niche' market and I think Stern has responded to that. I don't know what the percentages are between games bought by operators that go out on a route and games that go straight to someone's private game room, but I would guess the latter has a bigger percentage than it did 30 years ago.

    In a way, I like the fact that pinball isn't all the rage. If gives it a certain uniqueness.

    #16 7 years ago

    I think it's our job to pass it on. I know I am going to share my love of pinball with my kid. Maybe he will take to it, maybe not. Still, it's part of us that we can share. If it lives on great. If not, we gave it our best.

    #17 7 years ago
    Quoted from PW79:

    We are all borrowed time.
    Time dilation, the laws of thermodynamics & the Federal Reserve make sure of it!

    That's one way of looking at it.....

    #18 7 years ago
    Quoted from Ring-Them-Bells:

    I'm a Gen X'er and I've been playing pinball since I was a kid. My dad had a gameroom in our basement when I was growing up and now I've got games of my own. Even way back then, I didn't know anyone my age that was into pinball. Shortly after, stand up video games got popular, and then the game consoles came out.

    I'm also in this age group. And now that you mention it, even though there were a lot of pins in the arcades back in the day(80's), not many people played them. I remember quite well, that out of all my friends, I was the only one that preferred pins over video games. Most of them played pins occasionally, but video games ruled the day.

    #19 7 years ago

    I'm only 28 and remember playing pinball on windows 98 more than I do in an arcade. I've got a pre order in for Predator and am attending PAPA this year.

    There's still hope

    #20 7 years ago
    Quoted from markmon:

    I do have a 25 year old friend with a 35 pin sized collection.

    WOW!!!! That's a nice collection. I definitely won't reach the 35 pin mark in a few years.

    Quoted from Spankey:

    I think it's our job to pass it on. I know I am going to share my love of pinball with my kid. Maybe he will take to it, maybe not. Still, it's part of us that we can share. If it lives on great. If not, we gave it our best.

    That's what I keep doing when kids and teens come over, I ask them if they'd like to see my TSPP, and they love playing it. When kids keep asking me to get more pins, I know I'm doing my job to keep pinball going.

    #21 7 years ago
    Quoted from goatdan:

    For pinball in particular, if the machines were made so that bars could hold leagues on them with little input, they could start taking off.

    That would be AWESOME! It would be a great feature if I could walk into the local bar and choose to pay $1 per play instead of 50cents and the additional cash went towards the monthly high score trouney/pool on that game. It would also be great if a bar could effortlessly run a tournament if they had a few games.

    #22 7 years ago

    I think you doubt the next generation. With as many pinball video games being released, and kids to play them, eventually those kids will want to play those pins for real.

    It's like 5 years ago, there was a sudden resurgence for kids wanting to listen to records, RECORDS! And look at all the kids riding long skateboards, I haven't seen anyone ride those since the 70's. Everything comes back around, eventually. Even if it gets so bad that medieval madness machines start selling for a thousand bucks, eventually when pinball catches on again (and it will), they will be the first ones people will be after.

    #23 7 years ago
    Quoted from Honch:

    I'm also in this age group. And now that you mention it, even though there were a lot of pins in the arcades back in the day(80's), not many people played them. I remember quite well, that out of all my friends, I was the only one that preferred pins over video games. Most of them played pins occasionally, but video games ruled the day.

    I remember the days when the convenience stores had games. I remember playing Space Shuttle pinball while the rest of the kids hanging around Spy Hunter (the video, not the pinball), Punch Out, and all the rest of them. In the event that there was another pinball player, they were always older than me.

    The only place I remember seeing a lot of pinball games was at the local bowling alley and that's where I discovered High Speed, Pinbot and F-14. I'm thinking it was that way since the bowling alleys catered to an older crowd.

    #24 7 years ago

    I remember the days back in the late 70's early 80's, wherever I happen to be walking, I would take a peek into EVERY store, gas station or restaurant hoping to see a pin. The EXCITEMENT I would feel when I would see one inside all lit up!!!

    Now that I'm 44, and have the room and means to slowly start buying my own pins, it is an awesome feeling to be able to start living my dream.

    The bug has always been with me, but It REALLY got intense about a month or so ago when I picked up the Wms. collection for my X360. Over the past decade, I've grown bored with Madden, NCAA Football, NBA 2K, etc...All I want now are pins!

    #25 7 years ago
    Quoted from PW79:

    We are all borrowed time.
    Time dilation, the laws of thermodynamics & the Federal Reserve make sure of it!
    Yes one day we will look at our fleet of machines like the people of the great Holland tulip collapse did. Until then it will be fun though

    Good post, minus that Holland tulip collapse reference.
    Pinball & Tulips is like like comparing a Dali painting to a kid's stick figure drawing.
    Pinball has intrinsic value and is healthy to play.

    #26 7 years ago

    WTF if 1% of Americans 30 to 18 realize pinball is awesome and start playing or buying them then boom the results will be be insane. I didn't know any f-)king pinball head kids when I was 10-18, hell I didn't know any pinball heads from 18-28. This is the time pinball really shifts gears.

    Post edited by absocountry2 : Profanity edited

    #27 7 years ago

    If pinball becomes a televised event like poker. It will be a sensation. Who ever thought watching a bunch of people sitting around playing poker, would have been the big hit it is? If done right, pinball tournaments could do the same thing. Then you'll see a boom like no other, and pinball will be in every movie theater and restaurant like the old days.

    #28 7 years ago
    Quoted from CaptainNeo:

    If pinball becomes a televised event like poker. It will be a sensation.

    Yes great idea

    #29 7 years ago

    I'm 19 and I play pinball on location (yes, on location) almost every night for 2-3 hours. I'm sure there's at least a couple more of me out there. That said, I don't doubt that pinball is on borrowed time in some sense. I get the same "weird stare" some of you mention when I mention that I play pinball to my non-pinball friends. Maybe I'm just pessimistic, but I'm having a hard time seeing the market grow when there is practically no knowledge of pinball among the current generation of young adults / teenagers. It probably also doesn't help that there are very few arcades left, let alone arcades with pinball machines, let alone arcades with pinball machines that actually work. I'm lucky to have Full Tilt Ice Cream up here in Seattle, but I'm sure there's good portions of the country that are without all-ages locations.

    #30 7 years ago

    I operate the games at Full Tilt and it's absolutely amazing and awesome to me how many kids play them. I was there all day a couple of days ago and should have counted just how many kids played the pins, sometimes for hours on end. There were probably 30 of them between ages 5-14 playing pinball over the course of a day. Now, admittedly, their parents brought them there and were generally the ones showing them how to play and such, and were probably pinball fans to begin with, but it only took a game or two to get the kids hooked. Some others already knew how to play -- a girl who couldn't have been older than 12 was doing slap saves and drop catches! A few teenage girls who were part of a youth roller derby league (!) came in with their coach and were shown how to play for the first time, and before long they were challenging each other to head to head money matches and loving every minute of it. It was so cool seeing how excited they were to be discovering and playing pinball for the first time. I even talked to one of the families with 3 kids for a while and eventually told the mother about how people on pinball forums think today's youth has no interest in pinball, and the whole family erupted in protest and told me to tell all those people that they're full of it. I should add that all 3 kids were carrying note pads to write down their high scores on each game, which they apparently do every time they come in to keep track of their progress!

    Whether that means that pinball has a great future ahead I don't know, but I do get the feeling that younger people are tiring slightly of disposable digital entertainment and are attracted to the "real" kinetic appeal of pinball, as well as the whole retro appeal, similar to the vinyl resurgence mentioned earlier. I think with a little push -- say, pinball featuring prominently in a movie (not PDG..), tv show, song, etc -- it could see a huge boost. Something to re-introduce it to the general public and expose young people to it for the first time. Leagues and tournaments are doing a really good job of this as well, and have seen massive growth in the last few years thanks to the WPPR. The league I help run here in Seattle has had to stop seeking out members because we already have too many to wrangle. I know the pinball rankings and increasing tournament prize pools have certainly influenced Kevin here, as well as myself. Just 3 years ago I never would've imagined I would fly across the country to attend a pinball tournament, and yet here I sit making travel plans for my trip to the PAPA World Pinball Championships next week. It's all very exciting stuff. I really think it's a great time for pinball and that things will only get better.

    #31 7 years ago

    Some great stories. I teach vo-tech to 11-12 graders. I tell them everything about pinball every chance I get. Most are amazed about how many I have but are interested to know that there are goals, not just slap the ball around.

    #32 7 years ago

    I'm 25, and all my friends enjoy pinball because of me. I'm trying to spread the pin love to younger generations.

    #33 7 years ago

    I didn't play pinball as a kid, small world.. It was because of full tilt ice cream I thought ..this is bad ass I need this in my house... Went and purchased a few machines.. Now all my family, neighbors, friends demand that all parties and evens are at my house.

    As mentioned, for me ... Being able to drink eat and casually play pinball is amazing.. It's like owning a pool table, but less space needed.. And any idiot can play pinball with no skill or desire for skill.

    My name is Kelly I'm 31 and I'm a pinball addict

    #34 7 years ago

    The local bar in my area that holds pin leagues had a young group. Most of the league guys and girls are in their mid 20's. Yep, 3-4 of them are chicks and a couple of those are chicks that come by themselves. Not with a boyfriend of husband.

    #35 7 years ago

    we need more bobbyconover's around the country. Simply arent enough places for people to play for a resurgence to take hold. Nevertheless, we have all seen an expanded interest in the past few months to have some hope for the future.

    #36 7 years ago

    I don't know if he's on this forum, but the owner of our nickel arcades does a great job of promoting pinball. Unlike most arcades where pinball machines are hidden in a corner or up on a floor away from the main crowds he has a dozen pins lined up right along the front and in another location he put 16 pins out right in the middle. It's a nickel arcade... talk about doing all you can to make pinball accessible!! They aren't as used as the arcade or the ticket machines that he also has out but they are used. It's because of our nickelmania arcade that I even know about pinball.

    Will it ever be mainstream? I doubt it, its still for the most part a solo experience, not a social one. As much as I love playing with my friends and family at home, I still 'prefer' to just stand there and play on my own game after game after game. It's not like I can have a conversation during a game like I can playing pool or air hockey. There's no banter during a game, it's really a focused solo experience. That makes it hard to spread IMO That all sounds like a downer, pinball will ebb and flow and hopefully the demand for new tables never goes away, but mainstream... personally I don't see that happening (hopefully I'm totally wrong!!!)

    #37 7 years ago

    I wouldn't say it's on borrowed time.

    Pinball is constantly evolving.

    Late 1999 when Williams closed the hobby was really taking off. You could find great pins cheap and it really helped the hobby.

    While location play has been dieing a slow death. Is going to effect the hobby. Finding a new Stern pin or JJP pin cheap isn't going to happen. And resellers are running out of routed games coming in and know if they sell an A title Williams pin now, they may never have another one for stock again.

    The prices of new pins has risen dramatically, the A title games have followed along.

    And we may see in the future cottage industry games coming into the hobby with Jpop and Ben Heck, and others.

    Pinball has changed more in the last 12 years than the previous 50.

    Exciting times. It will be interesting to see where pinball leads us.

    LTG

    #38 7 years ago
    Quoted from CaptainNeo:

    If pinball becomes a televised event like poker. It will be a sensation. Who ever thought watching a bunch of people sitting around playing poker, would have been the big hit it is? If done right, pinball tournaments could do the same thing. Then you'll see a boom like no other, and pinball will be in every movie theater and restaurant like the old days.

    +1

    I don't agree with people who say it would never work. If you have a commentator like Bowen, who points things out, it would be fascinating. Viewers would learn rules by watching.

    Might not want to but it on CBS at 8pm time slot, but a cable station somewhere and other time would be fine.

    #39 7 years ago
    Quoted from Don1:

    Will it ever be mainstream? I doubt it, its still for the most part a solo experience, not a social one.

    Understand the point your making but would debate that...

    I find that pinball is actually more social then anything else..

    Pinball is physical, you must touch it.. Xbox "social" it's kids anywhere in their basements not leaving the house.

    That could be the problem, people don't interact with people any more.

    I don't know a game of pinball I play where others don't come watch at a minimum...

    Multiplayer games of pinball are always hot.. Including games with a ..whoever is last buys the next round.

    #40 7 years ago

    Don't have time to read it all right now, but got a few posts in, just wanted to say I agree with Gotadan.

    I am 31, when I was a kid, I played pinball not because I was inherently drawn to it, but I found a love of it because my PARENTS would play it when we were at an arcade. My dad had bought a Cyclone at one point, didn't even bother getting it fixed when the pops stopped firing, just sold it. If he were still alive I would kick his butt for that. But I remember playing Bride of Pinbot with my mom in the arcade many times. She was good at it, and it would kill me, I'd get pissed off and go play Street Fighter.

    #41 7 years ago
    Quoted from Spudgunman:

    Understand the point your making but would debate that...

    I find that pinball is actually more social then anything else..

    Pinball should be more social. After all, 'It's more fun to compete'. Unfortunately the vast majority of the new folks coming into the hobby don't see it that way. Same goes for many of the oldtimers. They're perfectly happy to play alone in their basements and 'socialize' on pinside and RGP. Maybe go to one or two shows a year.

    Quoted from Spudgunman:

    That could be the problem, people don't interact with people any more.

    That's it in a nutshell. They 'interact' on pinside, RGP and facebook, but not nearly enough face to face. I play on location regularly and probably will the rest of my life. It frustrates me that all these new people are getting into the hobby, yet I never see them playing on location. They're missing the best part of the hobby. When you play on location, anything can happen and often does. I played an AC/DC with a 9 year old kid named after Angus Young a few weeks ago at the beach. Afterward, I walked out of the arcade and watched Blue Oyster Cult play live for free. Things like that don't happen in your basement.

    To answer the original poster's question, location pinball is on borrowed time. Without that, the rest doesn't matter to me. I get more enjoyment out of playing on location than any other part of the hobby. I've done all I can to encourage people to play on location, including operating games, but it doesn't seem to be helping.

    #42 7 years ago

    There have been a few new arcades/pinball joints opening here in the Seattle/Tacoma area in just the last year. I don't think location pinball is on its last legs yet.
    Someone posted elsewhere that they think the kids who are rediscovering pinball have got bored with the XBox and other games and found that pinball requires a whole different set of reflexes and skills.

    I like our new pinball garage (it's something I've dreamed of for decades) and I constantly try to get people to come over and play. We like socializing as much as playing. Indeed, since neither my wife nor I are top players by any stretch, the social scene is as important (maybe a bit more so) than the competitions.

    LTG is right when he says pinball has changed more in the last 12 years than the previous 50. I've seen the former happen, I'm almost old enough to have watch the latter happen.

    Don't give up on pinball. It's Not Dead Yet!

    #43 7 years ago
    Quoted from LaughingOtter:

    There have been a few new arcades/pinball joints opening here in the Seattle/Tacoma area in just the last year. I don't think location pinball is on its last legs yet.

    The pacific northwest is the exception. You folks are very fortunate to have a thriving location scene with great operators supporting them. When global warming really kicks in, I'll be headed your way. d

    #44 7 years ago

    Pinball could never be televised like poker. Poker was a hit because it showed the best in the world being beat by lucky nobodies and walking home with millions. When you were done watching you could log on your computer and buy entries for $1 and satellite your way into a 10k buy in. Everyone watched knowing they had a chance. Also nobody is going to be able to see someone playing pinball and wonder how he had the sand to bet a chance at millions or shove his 50k CASH into a pot. I love pinball and it could become more popular. It would have to be because of a movie or other entertainment. I love pinball but poker isn't a just few guys sitting around a table. For example archery was one of the highest rated olympic events because of "Hunger Games". That's the angle. There could be money involved in winning a tournaments with a lucky ball bounce but how many people want to buy in for 5K to compete against Bowen?

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    Playfield - Plastics
    Mod Magic!
    $ 149.00
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    Sparky Pinball
    From: $ 99.99
    Cabinet - Other
    Lighted Pinball Mods
    $ 26.99
    Lighting - Interactive
    Lee's Parts
    $ 76.95
    Cabinet - Shooter Rods
    Super Skill Shot Shop
    $ 209.99
    Lighting - Led
    PinballBulbs
    $ 45.00
    Cabinet - Shooter Rods
    LightAndTimeArt
    From: $ 18.99
    $ 69.95
    Cabinet - Shooter Rods
    Super Skill Shot Shop
    $ 16.95
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    ULEKstore
    $ 9.95
    Playfield - Protection
    ULEKstore
    From: $ 44.95
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    PinBoss Mods
    € 100.00
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    Dystopian Mods Italia
    $ 5,799.00
    Pinball Machine
    Classic Game Rooms

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