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(Topic ID: 252504)

Is it ok to use your DNA Geneology to solve Cold Cases?


By hAbO

1 year ago



Topic Stats

  • 12 posts
  • 8 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 1 year ago by Manimal
  • No one calls this topic a favorite

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Topic poll

“Is it ok to use your DNA Geneology to solve Cold Cases? ”

  • Yes, its alright to use DNA results as long as they notify me first. 7 votes
    39%
  • No, my DNA is for my personal use only. 11 votes
    61%

(18 votes)

#1 1 year ago

My wife and I watch a lot of true crime stuff like "On the Case", "Homicide Hunter", and "Dateline". DNA testing has really evolved into one of the biggest payoffs for solving cold cases sometimes that were unsolved for up 40 years. To broaden the scope of a search, law enforcement has been able to use other DNA databases like Ancestry DNA and Heritage for example. Recently, the Golden State Serial Killer was matched using this method where one of his relatives submitted their DNA to research their family tree. Another case solved was of Christy Mirack - https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2019/jan/08/pennsylvania-dj-dna-schoolteacher-murder The same type of investigating has been used to prove the innocence of people falsely accused of murder.

So, whom does your DNA belong really belong to when submitting it to a company? Do you think its ethically alright to use your DNA?

#2 1 year ago

Had an in depth discussion about this just a week ago. I think we are entering into a brave new arena of crime fighting, and I actually don't know how I feel about it.

#3 1 year ago

Its one of those types of technologies that some of the laws have to catch up to with all the implications. I've never submitted DNA to do a family tree or genealogy but if any relative has then the whole family is essentially in there right?

#4 1 year ago

Innocent until proven guilty. Fishing through dna reverses that fundamental right. Sorry, no. Once theres probable cause through good police work fine, have a judge sign off on the warrant and proceed.
Dna is the property of the individual, always. These companies should test, report results to individual, and destroy the sample and the results. No one is entitled to it except the owner imho. But the cat is out of the bag already so see paragraph one.

#5 1 year ago

That's how they caught the Golden State killer. They had some of his DNA but wasn't able to do anything until one of his distant relatives signed up for one of those DNA sights. It's a very interesting story how they finally tracked him down

That being said, I'm not so curious that I would ever send a sample of mine to anyone.

#7 1 year ago

I'm sure our government is working to develop 'precogs' now for the next level, I mean why not stop a potential crime before it takes place?

#8 1 year ago

If you send off your DNA to '24 and Me' or similar company. If you signed the waiver and agreeing to their program. Your DNA is accessible to the Police and who ever has paid to access your info. There is an understanding that the Mormons are behind this DNA testing, but not sure on that.

#9 1 year ago
Quoted from Darcy:

There is an understanding that the Mormons are behind this DNA testing, but not sure on that.

It is my understanding that only morons send in evidence that somebody could find a way to use against them.

#10 1 year ago
Quoted from o-din:

That's how they caught the Golden State killer. They had some of his DNA but wasn't able to do anything until one of his distant relatives signed up for one of those DNA sights. It's a very interesting story how they finally tracked him down
That being said, I'm not so curious that I would ever send a sample of mine to anyone.

The book about that is pretty fascinating, because of my age and being so far from California I didn't really know about that piece of shit and all the rapes he managed to commit over such a long period of time. Glad they finally found him but too bad it didn't happen a long time ago so he could suffer longer for all the pain he inflicted on others.

#11 1 year ago
Quoted from bobukcat:

The book about that is pretty fascinating

I watched the TV documentary about it six or so months ago, and yes it was very fascinating. It was very tedious and meticulous investigation that led to his capture.

As opposed to Gacy, where he should have been put away with evidence they had long before they finally did. That was some serious bumbling detective work.
Similar to the Ed Buck story where it took almost three men dying before they arrested him.

#12 1 year ago

First off, you can get a DNA sample from someone, at just about any turn. Drop a cigarette, throw away a Kleenex, etc. DNA is already in the public domain. The DNA databases are just a research tool used to narrow a search, admittedly, sometimes to the very individual, but it is just a part of the investigation. It's no different than looking through a database of pictures, or having your fingerprints run through the FBI. It is a tool used to find killers and rapists, etc. and while NO type of identification is 100% fool proof, I sleep a lot better at night convicting someone with the help of a DNA match, than I would convicting someone solely on eye-witness testimony, which we all know is the most unreliable type of identification there is.

No prosecutor is going to charge a person solely on a DNA match from a database...they use it to identify a family, a likely suspect, etc....and then they either get a warrant for the actual DNA if they have other evidence, or they get the DNA from something discarded and use that for cause for search warrants, etc. Throwing away DNA is the same as throwing away a murder weapon with fingerprints still on it...no difference....it's all fair game. It's a new way of doing things with new technology, and I understand how some are scratching their heads and trying to figure out how they feel about it. But when you boil it down, DNA is just another tool. It does not replace good investigative work, and it is no different than many of the tools we have had at our disposal for years. It's just new.

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