(Topic ID: 232784)

Installing a new rectifier board on a Bally Eight Ball


By Sea_Wolf

5 months ago



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  • 51 posts
  • 16 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 5 months ago by Sea_Wolf
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There are 51 posts in this topic. You are on page 1 of 2.
#1 5 months ago

I’m replacing the old rectifier board because of a couple of burnt pins and the fact that it was old and dirty. My question is: Is it okay (or necessary) to let the solder run together when soldering in the 2 wires that go to both E7 and E8? They are close together and it looked like the hack that soldered in the old ones let the solder run together on E7 and again on E8. Being a newbie on early SS pins, I’ll take all the help I can get. I have marked all the wires with tape indicating E1,E2,E3 etc... and have taken pictures and made a color coded chart because I know from reading on here how you can’t be too careful when soldering them back. Any help or advice is greatly appreciated.

#2 5 months ago

NO, there should not be solder or any connection between the two points.

#3 5 months ago

Thanks Skidave. It’s a wonder this game didn’t burn up before I bought it. One other question I had was, how hard is it to pull the transformer out so I can have room to solder and then put it back in its cage to function?

#4 5 months ago

Don't mess with it. I used a card board box and some special tape to hold down wires. All helped lay it over in a good place.

#5 5 months ago
Quoted from Buzz:

Don't mess with it. I used a card board box and some special tape to hold down wires. All helped lay it over in a good place.

Thanks Buzz, that’s what I was hoping to hear. The guy who soldered in the old rectifier board wrapped each of the 12 wires with black electrical tape. I guess he was just being extra careful or maybe a wire or 2 was frayed but I didn’t see any fraying. I wonder if this is necessary or at least a good idea.

#6 5 months ago

I wrote down which wires went where and checked the schematic from the new and old. I also clipped the old wire to work with fresh wire and also not having to de solder old board gave a reference as well. I laid out all the wires and used some soldering tape to hold them in place before I soldered anything. Good light and some good prep and you've got this.

#7 5 months ago
Quoted from Buzz:

I wrote down which wires went where and checked the schematic from the new and old. I also clipped the old wire to work with fresh wire and also not having to de solder old board gave a reference as well. I laid out all the wires and used some soldering tape to hold them in place before I soldered anything. Good light and some good prep and you've got this.

Thanks. I’m going to take my time and also get a lot of practice soldering on the old board before I start. The new board didn’t come with schematics and the ‘E’ connection points don’t exactl line up with the old ones but I’m assuming that E1 still goes to E1, E7 left goes to E7 left, E8 Top goes to E8 Top....etc... There are the same amount of corresponding points and wires on both. Here’s a couple of pictures.

CEA2D565-AEBA-4690-8E83-2FE29719E865 (resized).jpeg76443801-9AB2-4B89-A155-D8F952CB19C3 (resized).jpeg
#8 5 months ago

I would take the whole thing, transformer and board, out and place it on your workbench, lots easier to work on it that way. If you are more comfortable leaving everything in the game do whatever makes you more comfortable. As far as E7--GI buss and E8--ground go, they are redundant points so don't worry about which hole, left right, up down, as they both end up in the same place. Just take your time and don't forget that new female connectors are part of the same job, too. Don't be afraid to use a lot of heat in the soldering process. I believe at last count I have installed well over 25 of these rectifier boards and the first one was the hardest. Good luck!

#9 5 months ago

Thanks Brian. Pretty awesome to be able to refer to both you guys’ advice during the process. Much appreciated and Happy New Year to you both!

#10 5 months ago

Also make sure your J1 connector has a key pin. I had a client who plugged his eight-pin connector offset by one position on the new rectifier board (it has nine pins) because it lacked a key. He made some of the magic smoke leak out.

#11 5 months ago
Quoted from JohnBillerman:

Also make sure your J1 connector has a key pin. I had a client who plugged his eight-pin connector offset by one position on the new rectifier board (it has nine pins) because it lacked a key. He made some of the magic smoke leak out.

Excellent advice.

#12 5 months ago

Thanks guys. I really appreciate the tips. I’m going in to this paranoid but educated. Not all bad

#13 5 months ago

Well you take the plunge yet? Trust me if I can do this stuff and more you can. I think I finally got all the gremlins out of my Strikes and Spares. Rectifier boards are not that hard with multiple solders close to each other. They are more inconvenient due to having to do in back box. Prep makes it easier. Wait to you graduate to TIP's. I got that solder tape off amazon and it helped hold things in place very well.

#14 5 months ago

Make sure you use solder safe for electronics. Don't use acid based solder (used for plumbing). Get some solder with a rosin core which will help the solder flow well. I still prefer to use lead based solder, easier to work with it's lower melting point.

#15 5 months ago
Quoted from Buzz:

Well you take the plunge yet? Trust me if I can do this stuff and more you can. I think I finally got all the gremlins out of my Strikes and Spares. Rectifier boards are not that hard with multiple solders close to each other. They are more inconvenient due to having to do in back box. Prep makes it easier. Wait to you graduate to TIP's. I got that solder tape off amazon and it helped hold things in place very well.

@buzz can you post a link to the Solder Tape please? I have never used that and am willing to give it a try in my projects.

Thank you.

#16 5 months ago
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#17 5 months ago

Worked great. Good hold with no residue and easy to remove.

#18 5 months ago
Quoted from Buzz:

Worked great. Good hold with no residue and easy to remove.

Thanks for the post.

Somehow, I thought that you were referring to a "melting solder tape" that you would wrap around a joint and then apply heat to it. Now I see that you mean a tape to hold items in place while you are soldering.

#19 5 months ago

LOL. I wish something like that existed for all the gravity defying need four hands stuff there is to solder on these things.

#20 5 months ago
Quoted from Buzz:

Worked great. Good hold with no residue and easy to remove.

Kapton tape is some pretty amazing stuff. I use it in the lab fairly often. Great electrical isolation properties, and the temperatures it can handle are beyond extreme. It could care less if you place a hot soldering iron up against it.

#21 5 months ago
Quoted from Buzz:

LOL. I wish something like that existed for all the gravity defying need four hands stuff there is to solder on these things.

Radio Shack used to sell solder strips that were intended to be wrapped around a connection and melted with a lighter or a match. Part #64-010 IIRC.

amazon.com link »

Just looked it up and scarily that was the right part #. I remember it well from working at the shack in the 90s because we NEVER sold any of it.

#22 5 months ago

I miss Radio Shack

#23 5 months ago
Quoted from mrm_4:

I miss Radio Shack

I miss the 70's Radio Shack

#24 5 months ago

And the new Radio Shack catalog every year. Like the the Sear's Toy catalog.

#25 5 months ago

I was there the year they decided to charge $2.00 for the catalog.... there was almost a riot.

They really should have survived but they were so stupid in their management - they put sales of cell phones above profits. The parts were their bread and butter and they blew it.

1 week later
#26 5 months ago
Quoted from Buzz:

Well you take the plunge yet? Trust me if I can do this stuff and more you can. I think I finally got all the gremlins out of my Strikes and Spares. Rectifier boards are not that hard with multiple solders close to each other. They are more inconvenient due to having to do in back box. Prep makes it easier. Wait to you graduate to TIP's. I got that solder tape off amazon and it helped hold things in place very well.

Thanks. I’ve finally got my 2 EMs up and running smoothly so the Eight Ball is next. Probably going to give it a go this weekend.

#27 5 months ago
Quoted from mbwalker:

Make sure you use solder safe for electronics. Don't use acid based solder (used for plumbing). Get some solder with a rosin core which will help the solder flow well. I still prefer to use lead based solder, easier to work with it's lower melting point.

Is this stuff from Home Depot good? I think it’s lead free but seemed to work ok on some of my EM contacts.

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#28 5 months ago
Quoted from Sea_Wolf:

Is this stuff from Home Depot good? I think it’s lead free but seemed to work ok on some of my EM contacts.[quoted image]

It's rosin core and mentions electrical - so that part sounds OK. It's silver bearing solder, and if I'm not mistaken, has a much higher melting point than 60/40 (tin/lead) solder. So given that comment, I'd likely be concerned w/small parts and PWB damage from heat.

I've used silver solder on parts years ago that required silver solder...sure did need a higher temp to flow well. A PIA to use. Not sure of the 'bearing' part of silver bearing.

Looking at the HD web site, they have leaded solder, but the diameter is rather large (0.062") - that's a bit much for parts, but for wires -no problem.

Here's some Amazon stuff if you want smaller: amazon.com link »

Just my 2 cents!

#29 5 months ago
Quoted from mbwalker:

It's rosin core and mentions electrical - so that part sounds OK. It's silver bearing solder, and if I'm not mistaken, has a much higher melting point than 60/40 (tin/lead) solder. So given that comment, I'd likely be concerned w/small parts and PWB damage from heat.
I've used silver solder on parts years ago that required silver solder...sure did need a higher temp to flow well. A PIA to use. Not sure of the 'bearing' part of silver bearing.
Looking at the HD web site, they have leaded solder, but the diameter is rather large (0.062") - that's a bit much for parts, but for wires -no problem.
Here's some Amazon stuff if you want smaller: amazon.com link »
Just my 2 cents!

Thanks for the input and the link. I have time to do more research. In this case I think it’s worth it before I take on this task.

#30 5 months ago

Except go to 63/37 instead of 60/40. 60/40 is a hair cheaper but 63/37 (also known as "Eutectic" composition) provides a much lower chance of getting bad solder joints due to it having an instant fluid to solid state change.

Best place to get an American brand (Kester) is through Kimco at www.gokimco.com
https://gokimco.com/44-rosin-core-solder-wire-sn63-pb37-031-66.html

This is a good Kester #44 rosin with 63/37 tin lead composition.
It costs about 2x that of the Chinese stuff in link above but is for a full, 1lb roll instead of the less than 1/4 lb roll.
You can also find the Kester #44, 63/37 solder in 3/4 ounce tubes on Amazon.

#31 5 months ago
Quoted from G-P-E:

Except go to 63/37 instead of 60/40. 60/40 is a hair cheaper but 63/37 (also known as "Eutectic" composition) provides a much lower chance of getting bad solder joints due to it having an instant fluid to solid state change.
Best place to get an American brand (Kester) is through Kimco at www.gokimco.com
https://gokimco.com/44-rosin-core-solder-wire-sn63-pb37-031-66.html
This is a good Kester #44 rosin with 63/37 tin lead composition.
It costs about 2x that of the Chinese stuff in link above but is for a full, 1lb roll instead of the less than 1/4 lb roll.
You can also find the Kester #44, 63/37 solder in 3/4 ounce tubes on Amazon.

Thanks a bunch G P E

#32 5 months ago

Following.

#33 5 months ago
Quoted from Buzz:

[quoted image]

Ok Buzz, I have the tape you mentioned and the solder that G P E recommended. Just want to make sure I use the tape in the correct manner. How exactly did you use it?

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#34 5 months ago

Kapton tape is usually used to keep wires in place (like the thin jumper wires) after installation to keep them from flying free. You could use them in soldering to keep the wire in place although if you move 1 wire at a time on a rectifier board installation I don't think it's strictly needed there.

#35 5 months ago
Quoted from slochar:

Kapton tape is usually used to keep wires in place (like the thin jumper wires) after installation to keep them from flying free. You could use them in soldering to keep the wire in place although if you move 1 wire at a time on a rectifier board installation I don't think it's strictly needed there.

Thanks Slochar. That helps a lot.

#36 5 months ago

Alot of heat around those boards during their lifetime. Crud wicks up the wires. Clip at least an inch off of each one before connecting to new board. If the solder doesn't want to flow, that's prob why.
Good luck.

#37 5 months ago
Quoted from Jjsmooth:

Alot of heat around those boards during their lifetime. Crud wicks up the wires. Clip at least an inch off of each one before connecting to new board. If the solder doesn't want to flow, that's prob why.
Good luck.

Great tip Jjsmooth. They are definitely gummed up too.

#38 5 months ago

I used it to help hold all the wires in place. I cut the wires off the old board and worked with new wire as mentioned. I found it easier for me to put all the wires where they belong and each held with the tape in place an inch or so back. Then I was able to see the order I wanted to solder without getting blocked by another wire. I personally like to fully prep before I work and I don't have to keep putting the solderer down and figure where the next went and so on. I felt it helped me a lot using the tape and making sure I had everything in place and the wires formed right so I could just solder.

#39 5 months ago
Quoted from Buzz:

I used it to help hold all the wires in place. I cut the wires off the old board and worked with new wire as mentioned. I found it easier for me to put all the wires where they belong and each held with the tape in place an inch or so back. Then I was able to see the order I wanted to solder without getting blocked by another wire. I personally like to fully prep before I work and I don't have to keep putting the solderer down and figure where the next went and so on. I felt it helped me a lot using the tape and making sure I had everything in place and the wires formed right so I could just solder.

Thanks. I’m taking your approach of planning everything out first and then going back and double checking. Hoping to have it ready to plug in over the weekend.

#40 5 months ago

Before I start. Just making sure about the tape. It’s ok while taping down wires after the soldering is complete that the tape can go over the solder itself that I just put down?

On a side note: The guy who put in the old rectifier board had every wire wrapped in electrical tape. I guess he was worried about the heat. I’m not sure but with these new rectifier boards, that shouldn’t be Necessary. Right? I didn’t see any fraying on any wires.
Thanks

#41 5 months ago

Soldering is finished. Started out shaky, (see E9) but finished up pretty good considering how tight an area I had to work in and me being a rookie. No solder drips are touching anything that I can see. I have a couple of wires on J1 to put connectors on and in about an hour, I’m going to fire it up. Ok, I shouldn’t use the word ‘fire’. Wish me luck and no smoke.

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#42 5 months ago

Success! Thanks to everyone on this thread for your help. I can’t actually believe I did it (thanks to you guys). One thing that it’s doing that I don’t know if it did before, is that I’m getting a little intermittent humming in the coin door. Making me nervous but the game lights up and plays and scores perfectly.

#43 5 months ago

Right on!!!! Very good feeling when you get something to work. As for coin door with power off just look around for loose connections or missing ground. That's a pin I would love to have one day glad you got it working.

#44 5 months ago

The coin door hum may be the coin relay that is always activated when the game is powered on. They can hum. If you are not using coins you can clip one of the leads to the relay. When the relay is not activated, coins will go from the coin slot directly to the coin return.

#45 5 months ago
Quoted from Buzz:

Right on!!!! Very good feeling when you get something to work. As for coin door with power off just look around for loose connections or missing ground. That's a pin I would love to have one day glad you got it working.

Thanks Buzz for giving me the confidence (and advice) to do it. I was worried I’d never get it going but I guess you have to go through that learning process with the same people who have been there before. You’re right, nothing like that feeling when you see it first power up. I was nervous as hell but the thrill was something else. It’s addictive. Eight Ball has always been my favorite game since the first time I played it in an arcade at 14 back in 1978. I’ll keep an eye out for one.

#46 5 months ago
Quoted from minnesota13:

The coin door hum may be the coin relay that is always activated when the game is powered on. They can hum. If you are not using coins you can clip one of the leads to the relay. When the relay is not activated, coins will go from the coin slot directly to the coin return.

Thanks for the tip Minnesota13.

#47 5 months ago

Congrats Seawolf! You've been busy! Now crack open that Alladins Castle

Don

#48 5 months ago
Quoted from pinzrfun:

Congrats Seawolf! You've been busy! Now crack open that Alladins Castle
Don

Up next Don. Right after I enjoy some victory beer.

#49 5 months ago
Quoted from Sea_Wolf:

Soldering is finished. Started out shaky, (see E9) but finished up pretty good considering how tight an area I had to work in and me being a rookie. No solder drips are touching anything that I can see. I have a couple of wires on J1 to put connectors on and in about an hour, I’m going to fire it up. Ok, I shouldn’t use the word ‘fire’. Wish me luck and no smoke.
[quoted image][quoted image][quoted image][quoted image]

Why didn't you remove the whole transformer and do it on the bench?? So much easier!

#50 5 months ago
Quoted from slochar:

Why didn't you remove the whole transformer and do it on the bench?? So much easier!

It was discussed earlier in the thread. It really wasn’t bad, once I got everything set up and some of the wires freed up. It basically came down to this newbie not wanting to take on any more tasks than necessary. I taped down 2 wires at a time and soldered them in, starting from one side and working towards the other. Having only 14 wires to solder made it easier. If there were 50, I’d have to have done it in shifts.

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