(Topic ID: 61082)

IJ restoration complete


By Bryan_Kelly

6 years ago



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  • 694 posts
  • 116 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 1 year ago by insx
  • Topic is favorited by 347 Pinsiders

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There are 694 posts in this topic. You are on page 3 of 14.
#101 6 years ago

You don't really think I'm going to put this back in a game with those stains on it, do you?? And trust me, no matter how much you clean it, they won't come out.

Here's a little trick to make the PCB panel look better than new. DA sander with 180 grit paper, then 220 grit, then 320 grit then finally red Scotchbrite pad. This whole process will take roughly an hour but the final results are worth it.

BTW This one I got from Chris Hutchins.

#102 6 years ago

DAMN!!! Let's try this again.

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#103 6 years ago
Quoted from Bryan_Kelly:

followed up with a BJ

I assume this is just to help you get through the day (wish my wife was as supportive of my work).

Awesome thread, worthy of a thumbs up and a written thank you!

Thank you for taking the time

Mark.

#104 6 years ago

Edit: Soz, ye olde double post, this site just doesn't like IE sometimes.

#105 6 years ago

Nice work Bryan. Should be a real sweet IJ once your done.

#106 6 years ago

Awesome post.

My only suggestion would be to place a sheet of plastic between the cabinet and the timber clamping blocks when fixing separated corners to prevent excess glue sticking the clamping block to the cabinet.

#107 6 years ago

Holly crap you are going all out. This is top notch stuff, what ever price you would put on this machine is not enough. I have spent some time on some machines and you always have to write off the time, but man, it boggles the mind to think.... what would all this time plus parts add up to in the real world. I am defiantly one of those guys that haggles on price but I will be the first to admit, when you buy a fully restored machine, done right like this one, any price (like add it up) ANY price close to what is accepted in this community is fair.

#108 6 years ago
Quoted from mickthepin:

Holly crap you are going all out. This is top notch stuff, what ever price you would put on this machine is not enough. I have spent some time on some machines and you always have to write off the time, but man, it boggles the mind to think.... what would all this time plus parts add up to in the real world. I am defiantly one of those guys that haggles on price but I will be the first to admit, when you buy a fully restored machine, done right like this one, any price (like add it up) ANY price close to what is accepted in this community is fair.

If you want a "restoration" done right, there's only one way to do it. At least, that's the way I see it.

More to come, stay tuned.

#109 6 years ago

Bryan,

It's nice to see you put such a passion into the work after all the theme you have been into pinball. The attention to detail is impressive.

#110 6 years ago

Bryan,

Some great advice in this thread. I have sympathies as I'm trying to carry out a complete TAF referbish alongside a wh2o one!! Pf's and all!!!

Just a quick question about the 'pcb panel' if I may?? I have one that is starting to lightly rust around the edges. Whilst sanding with a high grit seems perfectly reasonable and should bring the finish back, will the rust not return once in the machine, all be it slowly?? If so, any suggestions as to what to do with it???

Cheers
Paul

#111 6 years ago

Damn. Sorry, Paul, I forgot to mention, once you've got it sanded down, run a tack rag over it and give it a couple very light coats of clear. That's why that last pic shows it hanging from the wire.

#112 6 years ago

Thanks Bryan - I did wonder why it was hung up in the pic - thought it might have been to show off your handy work

I wait the rest with eagerness. Ive re-decalled the head of my cab (Wh2o), however not looking forward to the re-decal of the body as that 'sticker' is bloomin massive

#113 6 years ago

I worked on the base cabinet yesterday and today and it's not much different than doing the head. Sand, sand, bondo, sand, sand, bondo, sand, sand, sand, sand, prime, sand, sand, paint.

I would seriously hate to add up the amount of time spent sanding with all the different grits, but when it's all done, it's well worth it.

#114 6 years ago

Here's a little trick I use when Bondoing certain areas. I'll drill a series of small holes to give the Bondo something to "anchor" to.

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#115 6 years ago

And, of course, about the time I flip the cabinet over to deal with the bottom, I find more f'ing repairs needed.

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#116 6 years ago

Here's a pic of the bottom, which is pretty typical. About the only way I know of to clean this up is by sanding.

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#117 6 years ago

First thing I'm going to do is use a paint scraper to remove all the excess glue from the bottom edges.

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#118 6 years ago

Next, I'll go over the entire bottom with 80 grit paper in the DA sander. I'll simply use a sanding block to go around all the edges. Remember, it's particle board and has no grain. Makes no difference what direction you sand.

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#119 6 years ago

Depeding on how many times your game as moved by some ham fisted operator, you're going to have some scratches and gouges to deal with.

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#120 6 years ago

Here's a little trick I learned in the war. Well, not really, but that's what my Dad always says.

Take a pencil and mark all the scratches and the area around them. You simply pretty much sand until the pencil marks are all gone. I'll use my belt sander to get rid of most of them. Again, if you've never used a belt sander, DON'T DO THIS AS YOU MAY F THINGS UP WORSE THAN WHEN YOU STARTED!!

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#121 6 years ago

You're bound to have some that are just too deep to remove. For these, I do two different things. You can take your sander and tip it so the edge is doing the sanding. You want to only remove what you need to. Too much of this and you'll sand some nice grooves in your bottom.

The other way is to take your finger and a piece of sand paper and rub until the spot is gone. Once all that is done, I'll go over everything with the DA to smooth things out. First with 80 grit, then 120 and finally 220.

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#122 6 years ago

Last thing I need to do is sand or "break" the inside edge. I'll do this with a sanding block, but to keep me from hitting and marking up the bottom I just spend an hour getting to look nice, I'll use an old piece of laminate.

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#123 6 years ago

Now comes the worst part of this whole process. Sanding the inside of the bottom. Thankfully, this one is fairly clean but it's still an hour long process.

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#124 6 years ago

First thing I need to do is remove the bracket that holds the transformer. WE DON'T NEED THAT STINKIN THING!! Well, actually we do, but there's no way I'm getting the inside to look nice unless this and the speaker mount are out.

Needless to say, the only way to remove the transformer bracket is to destroy it. Mr. Sawzall works great for that. No sweat, I'll just make another one.

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#125 6 years ago

Ever wonder what's on the bottom side of those brackets. Probably not.

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#126 6 years ago

Here's how you cut an angle on a table saw and the second pic shows my new one installed shortly before the priming.

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#127 6 years ago

After hours of 80 grit sanding and hours of 120 grit sanding and hours of 220 grit sanding, the only thing left to do is sand all the sharp edges inside and out. Most importantly is putting the bevel back on the bottom edge. By the time I'm done sanding, there's not much of it left.

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#128 6 years ago

Oops. Almost forgot new chocks for the back.

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#129 6 years ago

Finally, I'm ready for priming. Well, almost. First, I've got to tape off the entire bottom. There's no f'ing way I'm going to get overspray on that bottom. Because some of my bevel on the bottom edge shows Bondo, I'm going to tape things off so the bevel shows and it'll get painted black.

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#130 6 years ago

Lastly, you need to tape off the entire bottom of the inside. You're going to get a ton of overspray when you paint the inside....and I mean a ton. This involves tape, paper, razor blade and a putty knife to get the tape pressed down around all the edges and corners.

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#131 6 years ago

Did I say razor.

SONOFABITCH!!!

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#132 6 years ago

These threads are by far my favorite, nothing but pure knowledge , thanks for doing these I really appreciate it !

#133 6 years ago

Finally, the POS is getting primed.

I need a beer.

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#134 6 years ago
Quoted from freezie:

These threads are by far my favorite, nothing but pure knowledge , thanks for doing these I really appreciate it !

Be careful using the name Bryan Kelly and "pure knowledge" in the same sentence.

#135 6 years ago

This is really great stuff, learning a lot!! Thanks for taking the time to post all of this!

#136 6 years ago

Put a band-aid on your wound and get back to work. Too much time between updates!

- Mike

#137 6 years ago

Bryan,

Thanks for taking the time to put this together. I'm in the process of working on a STTNG and was wondering how the hell the top guys get a nice finish on the bottom in between the piece of wood the transformer sits on and the backing for the coin box - now I know. I spent a lot of time sanding by hand trying to get that part looking as good as the rest of the bottom. It turned out OK but not as nice. Maybe next time if I feel adventurous I'll take the sawsall to the cabinet!

The artwork on the cabinet I'm working on is really nice (apart from a few minor scuffs) and was wondering if you approach the restore process different, or had any tips when you are working on a game where you keep the original cabinet artwork.

Thanks,
Erik

#138 6 years ago
Quoted from nutshell79:

Bryan,
The artwork on the cabinet I'm working on is really nice (apart from a few minor scuffs) and was wondering if you approach the restore process different, or had any tips when you are working on a game where you keep the original cabinet artwork.
Thanks,
Erik

I've done a few games where the original artwork is left alone, Erik. In fact, I'm currently working on a Congo for a friend in Denver. I can't think of anything that's done differently to those games, other than, the five sides with artwork on them are left alone.

#139 6 years ago

Here's a pic of the back of the Congo. To the right of it is a HUO SS I did the same thing to.

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#140 6 years ago

That looks great!

#141 6 years ago

It goes on and on and on and on and on....... Don't stop, believing!!

#142 6 years ago

This level of restoration is absolutely expert level. I also believe it is an art form. I love to see pictures of restore projects like this. 3rd favorite aspect only to playing and the hunt.

Thank you very much for sharing.

#143 6 years ago

I finally got around to spraying the base cabinet this morning. The following pics show how important it is to tape off the entire bottom in order to keep the bottom looking nice. Here, the paint is still wet.

When I do the insides of cabinets, I prefer painting the sides, back and front all the way to the bottom. For me, it gives a nicer, cleaner look.

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#144 6 years ago

And here, the back of the head gets the warning text screened.

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#145 6 years ago

I use rattle cans to do all my painting, which can be a bit of a bitch to get a nice even looking paint job, but they're great when you need to get into all the corners and tight places in the inside of the cabinets.

First tip is to use a halogen or bright light to shine on the surface you're painting. Second tip, a full rattle can gives you the best coverage, and gets worse as you spray. Once you're past the half full point, it starts to get worse. Having said that, I don't really care what's in the can when I do the first couple light coats. It's the last and final coat I make sure to use a full can and also make sure to overlap well as I go. With a little practice, you can get a perfect finish.

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#146 6 years ago

I've never kept track of the number of hours involved in the cabinet work, but it's somewhere around 40, and that only includes the time it takes to prep and paint the cabinet. It's the part I enjoy the most (I love woodworking) but it's also the worst. It's kind of like getting kicked in the nuts only because it feels so good when it's over.

The install of the artwork takes about 4 hours. So 40 hours worth of work before you can do the 4 most important hours worth of work!!

#147 6 years ago

Here are a few more parts out of the tumbler. And also most everything for the cabinet organized and ready to go back in.

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#148 6 years ago

Here's the knocker assembly all cleaned up and ready to go back in.

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#149 6 years ago

Bryan,
Dry application of decals?
Next Gen Williams decals?
And finally how durable should they be (will wrinkling ever occur around legs/buttons/side rails?
Thanks and loving watching your progress..

#150 6 years ago

Thanks for the thread Bryan, some great tips here. Looking forward to see the right way to do decals.

What type of paint do you use for the cabinet? I've used Laquer on wood cabinets with great results. Curious if there is a better type to use.

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