(Topic ID: 261882)

IC Sockets on stilts


By oldschoolbob

4 days ago



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  • 11 posts
  • 7 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 2 days ago by Tomahawkjim
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    #1 4 days ago

    Some time back I worked on a Williams Flash and I noticed that some of the IC sockets were extended above the board - sorta like sockets on stilts. Today I'm working on a MPU with possibly a short under the PIA socket. I thought the extended socket would be handy in this case to see what's going on under there. But I don't know what they're called or where to get them. Anyone have any suggestions?

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    #2 4 days ago

    Those are wirewrap IC sockets.
    https://www.digikey.com/products/en/connectors-interconnects/sockets-for-ics-transistors/409?k=wire%20wrap
    They are probably going to be going the way of the dodobird sooner rather than later.

    #3 4 days ago

    GreatPlainsElectronics.com also carries these parts.
    Support those that support us.
    --
    Chris Hibler - CARGPB #31
    http://ChrisHiblerPinball.com/contact
    http://www.PinWiki.com - The Place to go for Pinball Repair Info

    #4 3 days ago

    Thanks Zitt. In my case I don't want the legs extending through the board for wire wrap. I need to solder on the top of the board (lost pad on the bottom). It may be a tricky installation to keep the socket high enough above the board.

    I can see those being obsolete soon - at those prices.

    Thanks Chris. I get all my electronics from GPE - have been for six years. But I have never seen those wire wrap sockets there. Do you have a part number? Perhaps I missed them.

    And thanks for the work you do on PinWiki.

    Bob

    #5 3 days ago

    I don't think you could push the wire wrap socket into the holes of the board. The board is designed for standard IC sockets with thin pins. These wire wrap sockets are going to be larger square pins which "grip" the wire wrap wire.

    I too do not see these on GPE. I wouldn't expect him to carry them; as how many people really want "stilted" ic sockets.
    Too much risk for getting knocked off during maintenance and ruining a board by ripping traces off.
    By all means; post a link if you got them.

    #6 3 days ago

    oldschoolbob zitt You guys are right. I don't see them on Ed's site either. I stand corrected. My local electronics store has them. I've never used them. A standard machine pin socket can be raised high enough in the few cases that is necessary.
    --
    Chris Hibler - CARGPB #31
    http://ChrisHiblerPinball.com/contact
    http://www.PinWiki.com - The Place to go for Pinball Repair Info

    #7 2 days ago

    Wire wrap sockets have 0.025" square pins which tend to wreak havoc on the PCB through holes. My recommendation - don't use them.
    And wire wrap sockets tend to cost a heck of a lot more.

    Machine pin sockets are good if you need to solder both top and bottom side of board due to bad plated hole.

    #8 2 days ago

    Looks like the wire wrap idea isn't so good afterall. Besides not fitting the holes and like Zitt said you have the risk of hitting the extended socket.

    The problem with machine pin sockets is they are a little too short to easily solder under them. Someone needs to invent a machine pin socket that is just a little taller - maybe just 1/8 inch taller. Or perhaps SIP sockets that are taller just for repairs like this.

    Or maybe I'm just getting too old for delicate work like this.

    Bob

    #9 2 days ago

    A couple options you can try for tricky "between board and socket" soldering:

    1) use an iron (such as Hakko) with replaceable tips, and use a tip with a fine, angled needlepoint. This can allow you to fit the tip in tricky areas with tight surrounding clearances

    2) On more of a case-by-case basis, it's possible to break machine-pin SIPs apart and/or cut the plastic away from a single pin. You then install the socket in "sections". Use an old IC to keep your new smaller SIP sections aligned as you place them in the board. Then apply Flux to the exposed pin and board pad, and attempt to flow the solder in similar fashion. At any rate, by breaking the plastic away from the pin you're giving yourself extra visibility and access which just might be enough. You can even try it with closed-frame sockets too: simply remove only what's in the way. In all cases pay attention to the surroundings and make sure to keep the socket pins aligned.

    #10 2 days ago
    Quoted from oldschoolbob:

    Looks like the wire wrap idea isn't so good afterall. Besides not fitting the holes and like Zitt said you have the risk of hitting the extended socket.
    The problem with machine pin sockets is they are a little too short to easily solder under them. Someone needs to invent a machine pin socket that is just a little taller - maybe just 1/8 inch taller. Or perhaps SIP sockets that are taller just for repairs like this.
    Or maybe I'm just getting too old for delicate work like this.
    Bob

    I am a huge fan of SIP strips. When you remove the IC, you pretty much have full topside access to the hole.

    #11 2 days ago
    Quoted from oldschoolbob:

    Or perhaps SIP sockets that are taller just for repairs like this.

    I use SIPs and put two pieces of 22awg wire underneath, propping up the SIP so you can access the top pads if need be. The SIPs are still long enough to solder to on the bottom side.

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