(Topic ID: 289641)

I can deal with a pandemic, but no more #455 blinking bulbs?

By curtisdehaven

7 months ago


Topic Heartbeat

Topic Stats

  • 66 posts
  • 36 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 5 months ago by luch
  • Topic is favorited by 3 Pinsiders

You

Linked Games

Topic Gallery

View topic image gallery

DSC01910 (resized).JPG
Screenshot_20210525-134026 (resized).png
CB5197B8-B004-4995-AE79-A1D4B44F5D4F (resized).jpeg

There are 66 posts in this topic. You are on page 2 of 2.
#51 6 months ago
Quoted from frenchmarky:

Would adding anything simple to the lamp socket, say different resistors like a low ohm in series or a high ohm in parallel have any effect on the blink rate of the LED blinkers yet still be about as bright? Or is the rate going to stay essentially fixed no matter what?

From what I understand, there's some sort of a timer chip embedded into the lamp base. Adding a resistor to the socket isn't going to change the setting. If they are using a micro surface mount 555 timer you could change it but only if you could get inside and change the resistor and the capacitor on the timer.

#52 6 months ago
Quoted from schudel5:

From what I understand, there's some sort of a timer chip embedded into the lamp base. Adding a resistor to the socket isn't going to change the setting. If they are using a micro surface mount 555 timer you could change it but only if you could get inside and change the resistor and the capacitor on the timer.

Maybe whatever component of the circuit that makes it either a slow or fast blinker could just be changed to use a lot more values in between those two, i.e. if it's just a resistor or capacitor that's determining it. Then just mix 'em up and sell them as 'more randomly timed blinkers'.

#54 6 months ago
Quoted from tfduda:

And what about the poor souls in a few decades who are trying to repair the circuits in an EM that uses a 455 bulb as a delay and can’t find any incandescent 455s? How will they hack it?

I'll suggest trying the blinking circuit from the brake warning light in a LADA 2107, only with a different wiring. It works in the same way as the blinking bulbs, with a heating wire around a bimetal spring.

#55 6 months ago

Holy cow, these are going for $55+ a ten-pack on eBay. Makes me kinda sad.

#56 6 months ago

Just got the 10 in a bag deal from PBR today. I'm sure these aren't GE but I'm glad to have them just the same.

#57 6 months ago
Quoted from AlexF:

Just got the 10 in a bag deal from PBR today. I'm sure these aren't GE but I'm glad to have them just the same.

They appear to be old stock, has to be better than Eiko. Mine are only going in keepers.

#58 6 months ago

Behind the spinning disk in the Black Hole backbox there are about 11 of the 455 bulbs. I was doing a complete LED upgrade on the game and found that Comet actually has three different 455 LED replacements. There is a fast blink, slow blink and the third is a dim fast blink. This worked out perfectly because I used 4 of the fast, 4 of the slow and 3 of the dim fast randomly placed and it looks amazing. It looks totally random like stars flashing and the dim bulbs add to the effect.

That said I have a number of boxes of real 455s in my tool kit. I like to put them behind the machine name on EM backglasses.

1 week later
#59 6 months ago
Quoted from phil-lee:

They appear to be old stock, has to be better than Eiko. Mine are only going in keepers.

I know Steve had Westing House brands a long time ago.

1 month later
#60 5 months ago

I’ve got some pretty old EMs and never really bothered looking into blinking bulbs. For my games,
Stop ‘n Go
Mars Trek
Drop-A-Card
Ro Go
Super Straight

How do I find out where you’re supposed to use 455s? If this is how they authentically looked then I want to add blinkers to them. Plus I don’t know if any of them actually require a 455 on some delay relays to work properly. I’ve never looked into it.

Hopefully youse can educate this 455 newbie.

#61 5 months ago
Quoted from Isochronic_Frost:

How do I find out where you’re supposed to use 455s?

Typically in a backbox, the wood around the socket is dished out for the circular globe of the 455 bulb to fit.

Screenshot_20210525-134026 (resized).png
#62 5 months ago
Quoted from curtisdehaven:

What exactly is that? I assume the lamp is in series with something? What gets "delayed"?

Bally uses them for anti cheat and slam switches. The flasher acts as a timer. Knee the front door and the game will go dead until the bulb re-engages.

#63 5 months ago
Quoted from schudel5:

Typically in a backbox, the wood around the socket is dished out for the circular globe of the #455 bulb to fit.

That is true, except for the Gottlieb EMs. On those games, they used a different socket that sits farther inside the drilled hole, so that the round globe of the #455 bulb ends up above the wood face of the insert when the bulb is in the socket.

In other words, if you put a #44 or #47 bulb in a Gottlieb socket, and the lamp sticks out farther than the other lamps, it means that socket is supposed to have a #455 bulb in it.

- TimMe

#64 5 months ago

I will straight trade 100 NOS GE #455 bulbs for any JJP PotC.

#65 5 months ago
Quoted from ForceFlow:

It can serve as a simple method for the delayed release of a relay.
https://pinwiki.com/wiki/index.php?title=EM_Repair#Delay_Relay

Just to clarify the pinwiki language a bit, the #455 lamp is in series with the relay coil itself, via the relay coil lock-in switch. When the the bulb blinks off the first time, the power to the coil is interrupted, and the relay drops open. So the relay pulls in and stays energized for the length of time it takes for the lamp to blink out for the first time, usually just one or two seconds.

As was already mentioned, on a Bally game this is all wired into the regular 50 VAC circuit for the coils. The resistance of the relay coil is chosen to act as a current limiting resistor for the #455 lamp so that the lamp doesn't blow out, although the lamp is definitely running hotter than normal.

An LED blinker lamp will not work in this circuit. For one thing, an LED blinker does not work by interrupting the circuit, so the coil would never release. And in any case, I have to guess that it is very likely an LED blinker lamp would quickly be fried in this circuit due to the high voltages and high currents involved.

- TimMe

#66 5 months ago
Quoted from SpyroFTW:

I will straight trade 100 NOS GE #455 bulbs for any JJP PotC.

bulb porn

DSC01910 (resized).JPG
There are 66 posts in this topic. You are on page 2 of 2.

Hey there! Got a moment?

Great to see you're enjoying Pinside! Did you know Pinside is able to run thanks to donations from our visitors? Please donate to Pinside, support the site and get anext to your username to show for it! Donate to Pinside