(Topic ID: 221893)

How to remove Stern side rail with "buried" nut

By parsonsaj

3 years ago


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  • 28 posts
  • 18 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 3 years ago by wdennie
  • Topic is favorited by 1 Pinsider

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#1 3 years ago

I'm sure everyone is familiar with how side rails are attached on modern Stern games. I have an RBION which has the usual wear around the flipper buttons, so I decided to get new lollipop side rails and just cover up the worn paint around the flipper buttons. 2 round head bolts on each side, 2 screws on the outside holding the existing rails in, should be a piece of cake!

HOWEVER...

The right side rail has a bolt that someone tightened so much that the nut is literally embedded into the wood. The top half of the nut is exposed, but it's not enough to be able to grab it with a wrench or pliers or anything.

What's the best way to go about getting this out without extensive cabinet damage? My first instinct was to just gouge the wood around the bottom half of the nut to give me enough room to get a wrench on it to free it up. That could be covered up with a washer under the nut, but obviously it would be damage that I would have incurred willingly (and would render this game incapable of ever being considered imamaculate). Any suggestions for doing this without any damage to the cabinet?

#2 3 years ago

Does a nut driver not work?

#3 3 years ago
Quoted from CadillacMusic:

Does a nut driver not work?

No, tried that too... the bottom edge of the nut is just buried in the wood of the cabinet so the nut driver won't grab the nut. It worked great on the one on the left side, though!

#4 3 years ago

Can you thread a screw into the nut and use that for leverage to pull it out?

#5 3 years ago

pics?

#6 3 years ago

It occurred to me after I posted this that a picture would have been REALLY helpful... unfortunately I won't be able to add one for a few more hours. I will post one later, though!

#7 3 years ago

You would think there would be enough space to get some sort of tool in it as someone used a tool to tighten it that much. Maybe a set of needle nose pliers could work. Can you get vise grips on the top portion of the nut? Could a socket be tapped lightly over the nut?

#8 3 years ago

Maybe an “ easy out “ tool used for removing stripped and broken screws. Possibly drill into the head of the bolt, thread in the easy out bit and then you should be able to unscrew the bolt.

#9 3 years ago

Ok here’s a picture... not great at taking them

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#10 3 years ago

Needle nose pliers?

#12 3 years ago
Quoted from LTG:

Thin nosed vice grips.
LTG : )

For the win!!!

#13 3 years ago
Quoted from Mitch:

Needle nose pliers?

Tried didn’t work... not enough metal to grip

#14 3 years ago
Quoted from Monk:

For the win!!!

Hmmm I don’t have these.... will check at the hardware store

#15 3 years ago

I think needle-nosed vice grips will be the ticket.

#16 3 years ago

Sometimes I'll take a small drill bit and ride along the outside of the nut and make room for a socket or a nut driver. A little black paint and done. You'll have the same problem putting it back on unless you're going to washer it up.

#17 3 years ago

A "quality" six point socket would grab that. At least it would have before it started getting chewed up trying other methods.

#18 3 years ago

Take a deep well socket, put it over the nut, hit it with a dead blow hammer to "seat" it around the nut (this will compress the wood fibers), put the socket wrench on the socket and remove as usual.

#19 3 years ago

Use dremel to cut into nut, not too deep. Put flat blade screwdriver into notch. Use hammer on the screwdriver to turn nut.

#20 3 years ago
Quoted from vid1900:

Take a deep well socket, put it over the nut, hit it with a dead blow hammer to "seat" it around the nut (this will compress the wood fibers), put the socket wrench on the socket and remove as usual.

My Spider-Man ve was just like your picture. I did what VID suggested and it worked perfectly. When I reinstalled I used a washer that would keep the nut from sinking back into the wood!!

#21 3 years ago

I had this same issue awhile back. I advise Patience and walking away from it when you get frustrated.
Needle nose vice grips didn't do it for me. I approached this by working my socket to have thiner walls on the grinder.
Think Vid's method will work with caution.
I have to tackle this same issue with my LE and you can be assured i'll take my time.

#22 3 years ago

I use a chisel and a hammer to turn nuts that are too chewed up to use a socket.

I'm not sure I'd recommend that to someone that is already having a difficult time with something like this though.

#23 3 years ago
Quoted from vid1900:

Take a deep well socket, put it over the nut, hit it with a dead blow hammer to "seat" it around the nut (this will compress the wood fibers), put the socket wrench on the socket and remove as usual.

Get a dead blow hammer. Not a rubber mallet
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#24 3 years ago

Impact driver.

Never failed me yet.

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#25 3 years ago

Dynamite

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#26 3 years ago

It's interior wood that will never be seen. Drive a socket over the nut with a big-ass hammer and remove the nut. Or, chop the wood out with a small chisel. Cover with a washer if necessary. On both sides of the cabinet if it bugs you.

#27 3 years ago
Quoted from o-din:

I use a chisel and a hammer to turn nuts that are too chewed up to use a socket.
I'm not sure I'd recommend that to someone that is already having a difficult time with something like this though.

same idea slightly different methodology as I said

#28 3 years ago

Your lucky, try getting one off like that on the bottom side of the rail.

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