(Topic ID: 5784)

How to regrain Stainless lock bar?

By Av8

10 years ago


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  • 20 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 7 years ago by futurepinhead
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    #1 10 years ago

    What is the best way to regrain or polish stainless steel lock bar?  I have heard of people using wet sandpaper. Anyone have experience with this?

    Thanks.

    #2 10 years ago

    I have used foil and windex, steel wool, and stainless steel cleaner, never used the sandpaper deal. It all depends on the shape of the stainless?

    #3 10 years ago

    Ive just always bought a new one, if you want to restore yours I guess some wet/dry 800-1000 grit sand paper.

    #4 10 years ago

    I always try a Scotchbrite Pad first. If that doesnt work I move up to sandpaper.

    #5 10 years ago

    I've had good luck with coarse (tan colored) Scotchbrite pads recently. Deep scratches would pretty much need to be sanded out first, as the Scotchbrite won't totally make them disappear, unless you use lots and lots (and even more lots) of elbow grease. Makes a great improvement though.

    Also works on siderails, just tape over anything you don't want scratched.

    #6 10 years ago

    Start with a grit around 150, move across side to side, then go to automotive wet sand paper about 300 ( and keep it wet), then about start using about 200 or so grit higher (whatever you can get). I finish with a 2000, which is more or less a buff. You will achieve a look better than you thought.

    The key is to move ALWAYS in the same directions. If you go against the grain even once, or in a slight angle, you will see it and more or less have to start from the start again. Apply even pressure as well. Problem deeper scratches need to be worked out in the low grit stages, as after this you are buffing more and more.

    As you get to higher grits, the time required with each will drastically reduce.

    #7 10 years ago
    Quoted from hawkeye11:

    I always try a Scotchbrite Pad first. If that doesnt work I move up to sandpaper.

    Absolutely! Just go in the direction of the grain. If you don't take off the parts to re-grain them, you'll need to use painters tape on anything not being Scotchbrite'ed.

    I wouldn't use steel wool. It tends to shed and can imbed into the metal and start to rust.

    #8 10 years ago

    I did mine with 3 stages of steel wool (very coarse to 000) with a stainless steel conditioner liquid. Cleaned thoroughly between scrubbings. Followed that with a Scotchbrite pad. Turned out very well.

    #9 10 years ago

    Thanks for great response. Heres a before pic.

    Ill try scotch pads. And advise.

    I also have an extra Williams lockbar for sale. 28 plus shipping.

    20110909_185703.jpg

    #10 10 years ago

    have a look at the lockdown on this taxi I worked on: http://evolve-studios.net/taxi/
    that thing was all scratched up - I use a very similar method to atomic boy mentioned above, do long straight sanding strokes the length of the lockdown bar. Do not do small quick back and forth strokes - long and steady and work your way thru the grits then finish with some buffing and wax

    #11 10 years ago

    Nice restoration work on that Taxi, fusion! I forgot how rough that thing started out.

    #12 10 years ago

    Looks real good, thanks.

    #13 10 years ago

    That is a lot of work.

    #14 10 years ago

    I use the 3m combi wheels or similar. they are a flap wheel that has alternating layers of sandpaper and scotchbrite, makes the job so much easier. start with the course or med grit and work your way down to the fine... unless you get the expensive combo wheels do not put these in a die grinder as they will fly apart. I use a cheap electric drill and have great results. you can pick them up at the ace or true value hardware stores for around 6 or 7 bucks. if you like the shiny look, use the combi wheels to get the nicks and scratches out and then put it on a buffing wheel with polishing rouge to make it shine like chrome. I regrain all the stainless on each project I do using these wheels, this leaves a nice satin finish and wipes out the habit trails.

    here is an online dealer that carries something similar

    http://www.abrasivesupply.com/Abrasive_Buff_and_Blend_Wheels_s/48.htm

    #15 10 years ago

    Lots, and lots...and lots of sanding - as posted by others. Frankly, it's not worth it (assuming it's more than just light scratches) given the cost for a replacement of a lock bar, IMO. For other pieces, like ball guides, most definitely worth the effort.

    #16 10 years ago
    Quoted from kmoore88:

    Lots, and lots...and lots of sanding - as posted by others. Frankly, it's not worth it (assuming it's more than just light scratches) given the cost for a replacement of a lock bar, IMO. For other pieces, like ball guides, most definitely worth the effort.

    the combi wheels and a drill take all the work out of it. 20 minutes and you have a brand new looking bar. I normally get several machines regrained from one 12 dollar set of combi wheels. far cheaper than spending 60 bucks on a new bar... but to each is own.

    #17 10 years ago

    Speaking of lockdown bars.. my gorgar lockdown bar doesn't lay flat against the glass. I've tried to adjust the screws underneath etc. to no avail. I don't know.. just thought I'd put it out there. I used turtle wax's chrome/steel cleaner on it.

    #18 10 years ago

    "the combi wheels and a drill take all the work out of it. 20 minutes and you have a brand new looking bar. I normally get several machines regrained from one 12 dollar set of combi wheels. far cheaper than spending 60 bucks on a new bar... but to each is own."

    If you have the equipment and plan on doing more than one.

    #19 10 years ago

    Scotchbrite pads! It worked great on my DeLorean, It will work for the lockdown bar.

    #20 10 years ago

    Scott bright pads worked very well. They didnt take all the scratches out but it made a huge difference.

    THAT Taxi restoration is totally amazing! How did you do the cabinet art work! Can you fix my play field?

    #21 10 years ago
    Quoted from fusion301:

    have a look at the lockdown on this taxi I worked on: http://evolve-studios.net/taxi/
    that thing was all scratched up - I use a very similar method to atomic boy mentioned above, do long straight sanding strokes the length of the lockdown bar. Do not do small quick back and forth strokes - long and steady and work your way thru the grits then finish with some buffing and wax

    /

    very nice taxi resto! im in the middle of restoring a taxi as well but cant find the cabinet artwork. Did you print out your own? Do you still have the scans if you did?

    #22 10 years ago

    remember if you use metal on stainless Steel make sure it is also SS
    if not over time when everything is said and done you may start to see rust
    especially in the palm area or hand rest area - natural salts + humidity etc .

    #23 10 years ago
    Quoted from kmoore88:

    Lots, and lots...and lots of sanding - as posted by others. Frankly, it's not worth it (assuming it's more than just light scratches) given the cost for a replacement of a lock bar, IMO. For other pieces, like ball guides, most definitely worth the effort.

    replacements are nowhere near the mirror finish you can achieve with the method I mentioned.

    The sanding actually isn’t that much. Takes me about 15 min per lock down bar.

    #24 10 years ago
    Quoted from kmoore88:

    Frankly, it's not worth it (assuming it's more than just light scratches) given the cost for a replacement of a lock bar, IMO.

    Unless of course you have a widebody machine, in which case, you're lucky to find a lock for sale at any price... I sure hope JJP starts selling them as parts for WOZ, as my TZ has the lockbar held together with screws (yup, instead of epoxy or welding, a previous owner decided to hold it together with screws... Looks like crap).

    1 year later
    #25 9 years ago

    Great forum topic! I recently learned that on simple surface rust on certain platings especially chrome you can use wadded up tin (aluminum) foil and rub off rust. It actually worked pretty darn good and I was surprised.
    I think for making the bar or any other similar metal really come out good, the scotch bright method would work or the wet sanding method going higher on grit up to 2000 or so to get that deep polish.

    Do you have to finish off with some kind of sealant though or wax?

    1 year later
    #26 7 years ago

    I am going to resurrect this thread. I am hoping someone has some progress photos they can add. I recently got a nice coin door but was filled with swirling scratches and I would like to get nice straight grains.

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