How many RPMs is a Mixer motor?


By bingopodcast

1 week ago


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  • Latest reply 35 minutes ago by Ballyoldboy
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    #1 11 days ago

    I'm trying to determine the correct number of pulses per minute on a 16 pulse switch like the select now lites. Of course this is variable based on the motor RPM, but most I've played/worked on seem to be just about the same. Math!

    What was the default config?

    I'm checking a manual now, but thought I'd check with folks here in case someone knew off the top of their head.

    #2 11 days ago

    I think I'm going to try to emulate the E-119-212 - it seems common and most will not notice an extra revolution per minute or so if there's a big range.

    The manual does not specify RPM, only part. Looking around, and not finding a lot of info yet.

    #3 11 days ago

    this is from memory, so be concerned ...

    depends on the game/motor. The multiproducts and probably merkle motors were 19 rpm. Some of the late model molon motors were 23 rpm, and would run at 25 in countries with 50Hz power.

    the rpm is stamped on some of the gearboxes if you have some loose motors to look at.

    #4 11 days ago

    Excellent, thanks @baldtwit. I do have some loose motors, but they are up in my attic and I'm lazy.

    #5 11 days ago

    I know for sure the early motors (at least up through the Bounty) ran at 19 RPM. Not sure about the later ones, but they were definitely faster. The replays racked up really fast!

    #6 11 days ago

    Night Club has a pretty fast control unit motor, but I am only concerned with the mixer.

    1 week later
    #7 20 hours ago

    Wrong!!
    It will run 20% slower at 50 Hz. You have it the other way round. Living in the UK I suffer from this all the time
    Sorry the quote didn't come up from the few posts above me

    #8 7 hours ago
    Quoted from Ballyoldboy:

    Wrong!!
    It will run 20% slower at 50 Hz. You have it the other way round. Living in the UK I suffer from this all the time
    Sorry the quote didn't come up from the few posts above me

    yes, that was wrong. It was a different motor part number that ran at 25 rpm. There's three main documented rpms of mixer/CU shaded pole motors:

    1] the earlier motors with only two lugs on the stator winding ran 19 rpm at 60Hz. Those will run slower and hotter at 50Hz

    2] later motors with three lugs on the windings - common, 50Hz and 60Hz. Like E-119-462 and E-119-359

    Keeping in mind I mostly ignored my motors class in school, one possibility is the different lugs will alter the magnetic field strength and the "slip" of the rotor in the field, allowing the speed to stay about the same at 50 or 60Hz. Since slip would be dependent on torque requirements (resistance to shaft turning due to clutches and switch lifting), that would kinda explain why there's different motor part numbers for different games/game types.

    Or the lugs are just for managing the power and the motor runs around 23.4 rpm at 60Hz and 18.7 rpm at 50Hz.

    Got a machine with 50Hz lugs and want to estimate the rpm? ... or know someone who didn't skip all but two of their motor class lectures?

    3] the E-119-370 motor was 25 RPM, 50Hz only and sometimes says "Belgium" in the manuals.

    anyway, the motors mostly ran at 19 RPM, but some ran at 23 or 25. Afaik, the faster motors were just on games well after Bounty.

    Bounty has two motors in the manual - E-119-212 (60Hz) and E-119-234 (50Hz). The only difference is the stator....I assume the length of wire in the winding.

    #9 35 minutes ago

    Very interesting baldwit, you have brought up a subject very dear to my heart. I have often wondered which lug either the 50 or 60Hz would produce less strain/heat on the coil here in the UK. Since my Bally Hawaii spotting motor went up in flames some years ago wired to the 50Hz lug I have often agonised as to weather it might not have happened if 60Hz lug had been used. Which lug produces the most resistance and would that make it run hotter in the UK due to the increased strain? (Not sure if I've made sense with that). No motor class lessons in my school we were all busy thinking about girls

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