(Topic ID: 280548)

How does one man raise/lower a Tron pro playfield?

By SBrothers

12 months ago



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  • 9 posts
  • 6 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 12 months ago by DaveH
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    #1 12 months ago

    So I acquired a Tron Pro (on loan from a friend) and it’s the first pin I’ve had with the SUPERCHEAP prop legs on the playfield. I’m used to rails where you can rest the playfield in various positions AND one man slide it back into the game from the front.

    How on God’s Green Earth is one man expected to slide the playfield back into place on this game?

    Am I expected to hold the backboard with one hand and the apron with the other, like an eagle taking flight?

    I searched various phrases as I’m sure this has been covered before...came up empty handed.

    Any sage wisdom?

    #2 12 months ago

    I don't recall it being much different other than only being able to rest it on those legs once pulled out. It still has slides and pivot pin at the rear of the playfield like many games of its era. You just do not have the brackets at the front that allowed it to be rested in multiple locations once slid out. It's been several years since I owned one but it was no different than any other title I had.

    #3 12 months ago

    My Walking Dead has pegs like this. It's been a while since I had that playfield out and had to ram it back home, but the key operative word here is "ram". From what I recall, you grab the pegs and slide the playfield back into the cabinet, then all of a sudden, the playfield encounters resistance and stops before it gets all the way back, and you're like WTF? Well, the playfield has just encountered a small bump in the rail system, and you have to ram/shove it past that little bump. Yeah, it feels pretty violent, and not like something you really want to do, but I guess it was designed like this. I had a friend who had Stern games from this era on location, and I asked him about it and he was like "Yep, I just ram them back them back into position".

    On my Sterns from this era with playfield brackets instead of posts, I'll let the brackets rest on the front of the cabinet and I'll grab the back of the playfield and front of the playfield at the same time, and I'll lift the playfield over this bump and slide it back slightly, then go back to the front of the machine and slide the playfield the rest of the way in, as I hate the feeling of ramming the playfields home. I need to brackets from Pinball Life for my Walking Dead. Those pegs suck.

    #4 12 months ago
    Quoted from Tlamb:

    I don't recall it being much different other than only being able to rest it on those legs once pulled out. It still has slides and pivot pin at the rear of the playfield like many games of its era. You just do not have the brackets at the front that allowed it to be rested in multiple locations once slid out. It's been several years since I owned one but it was no different than any other title I had.

    Thanks for the quick reply...

    But how do you get the playfield pins that are resting on the cabinet rails to “hop” over the rail stop if you can’t pivot them up and over using the forward playfield rails that are normally there?

    I usually slide the playfield back into the cabinet until it hits the rail stop on the cabinet rails, then pull slightly down on the forward playfield rails (They pivot on the front edge rails of the cabinet) to slightly leverage the playfield pins over the rail stop so the playfield can be slid back into place.

    Not sure how to best navigate the cabinet rails stops.

    #5 12 months ago
    Quoted from Rum-Z:

    My Walking Dead has pegs like this. It's been a while since I had that playfield out and had to ram it back home, but the key operative word here is "ram". From what I recall, you grab the pegs and slide the playfield back into the cabinet, then all of a sudden, the playfield encounters resistance and stops before it gets all the way back, and you're like WTF? Well, the playfield has just encountered a small bump in the rail system, and you have to ram/shove it past that little bump. Yeah, it feels pretty violent, and not like something you really want to do, but I guess it was designed like this. I had a friend who had Stern games from this era on location, and I asked him about it and he was like "Yep, I just ram them back them back into position".

    So basically the “hit it with a hammer” approach!

    That is some “next level” engineering right there

    #6 12 months ago

    Or you can do the spread eagle approach. Grab the front and rear of the playfield and lift the rear enough to get it over the hump and then slide into place. Clumsy ,I know, but, I am not a big fan of the ram it home approach

    #7 12 months ago

    Hold the pegs with the playfield as flat as possible and push the playfield (from the pegs) over the small hump on the rails. It's really not a difficult move or problematic. The pegs themselves suck, no doubt, but it doesn't change the move to push the playfield back in place.

    #8 12 months ago

    Yup, basically need to give it a strong nudge

    #9 12 months ago

    It's like the first time you took the glass out of a game, and you were all scared of it. But quickly you treat it like another pinball part.

    Yeah, the design bites, but it is what it is. The "humps" at the back of the rails on the side are there so you don't accidentally slide it off the back. Unfortunately that means it requires more force than you think it should. Stand in the player position, hold both pegs, pull it a bit towards you, and then slam it back over the humps. It will feel like you are slamming it into a wall, but eventually you will get the feel for how much force you need.

    Things to watch out for? Well that would be when you are putting the playfield back down, because those pivot points on the bottom of the playfield will gouge the inside of the cab if you're not straight. Also (like a lot of games), watch he cables and grounding strap to make sure they do not get pinched at the backboard of the playfield.

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