How does one make pinball a living?

(Topic ID: 215486)

How does one make pinball a living?


By Mistermoberg

11 months ago



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#51 11 months ago

Want to make a living in pinball? Become a designer.

Let me tell you a little story. There once was a guy on pinside, and he drove around in NYC in a Dodge Challenger, and his mother had a very fancy kitchen and owned apartments in NYC, and he was a boy man, a lot like Peter Pan. He provoked a lot of thought and controversy, and bought LE's to flip and ask stupid money for them, and could basically do whatever he wanted because his parents gave him a silver spoon to eat off of.

That's not you.

While I'm not trying to rain on your parade of your hopes and dreams, take it from someone that's been in this game a long time and pushed 500+ games through my doors. You're not going to make it selling pinball. Not unless you are already well established, have a lot of extra cash and know exactly what you're doing every step of the way. Experience in pinball is something you can't teach and money can't buy it- you learn it. It takes years. I'm still learning.

Nowadays, everyone wants pinball. It's not like the old west 7-8-10 years ago where you could get them because nobody wanted them. Now everyone wants that same game you're trying to get and prices are on the moon.

19 huh? If you were even in a position to do such a venture, you wouldn't be asking pinside about any of it. That's like the people that ask ''what game should I buy next?'' How the hell do they know? Only you know what you really want or can buy, nobody else does.

Flipping pinball? Routing? Resale? Unless you have that same silver spoon, good luck trying to make a living in pinball.

#52 11 months ago

I've made my passion for pinball my work since 1980 and never got bored or burned out with. Go for it!

#53 11 months ago

Like others have said - there's no quicker way to take the joy out of something you love than doing it for a living. Even making it a hobby can take the joy out of it at a certain level. I've been operating a small route now with a few others for about 4 years and can tell you this:

1. It's a lot of work, as we have to maintain all the games (otherwise we would have shut down after 2 months)
2. When attending events where you just get to show up and have fun, it's great fun! As soon as you start organizing and running them regularly the fun can diminish.
3. Haven't paid ourselves at all - everything has gone back into buying games. If this were my "income" I'd have to sleep underneath a few of the games!
4. Keep your day job to pay the bills and enable you to do what you love.
5. There are tons of Barcades turning up. As with everything new, I feel that this is a retro phase we're in. Eventually they'll fall out of favor (or there will simply be too many of them) and you'll start seeing them shut down. May not be for 7-10 years, but it'll happen eventually.
6. If you decide to go into the pinball business in any way, partner with someone that does all the stuff you don't enjoy doing. Sharing the work makes it easier.

As others have stated, maybe working at a local company that supplies games and learn how to repair them.

Or...move to Benton WI and work for Spooky pinball! Last I heard, Charlie was still looking for testers.

- Sean

#54 11 months ago
Quoted from Mistermoberg:

To those who are in pinball for a living:
I'm 19 years old. I'm in a sales job, and in all fairness, I have nothing to complain about. I make a great living, my hours are reasonable, and I can make tournaments and events (pretty much) whenever I feel like.
But, it's not my passion.
I want nothing more than to make pinball my living. I have no desire for flashy things (except pins) - and have no intention on getting married or having children, ergo, I'd even be fine with making a little less than I do now.
What's the most profitable sector of the industry to get into? Selling games? Routing games? Parts and labor? Owning a location?
I'm young, I have nothing to lose, and I don't want work to feel like work. Not that I'm not willing to work, I just want to love what I'm doing.
Any advice or guidance, in any direction is greatly appreciated.
Thanks,
Eric

Pretty much what everybody else has said.

Basically, you are dreaming. Turning your hobby and passion into your living is a good way to lose your passion. When your passion has to cover your monthly nut and business hits a slow spell then it all becomes a daily chore.

Look at it this way: If you are good at sales ( I was not ) and you are making a good living then go find something different to sell, perhaps.

#55 11 months ago

Open an arcade in a busy shopping mall. Put a bunch of pinball machines in it and you will make crazy money. But first, you will have to develop a time machine to take you back to the 1970's.

#56 11 months ago

Change your mind about getting married and then marry Gary Stern's daughter

#57 11 months ago
Quoted from bonzo442:

Change your mind about getting married and then marry Gary Stern's daughter

Too late....she got married over 6 months ago...............

#58 11 months ago
Quoted from Homepin:

Too late....she got married over 6 months ago...............

Lucky Guy!

#59 11 months ago
Quoted from Tomahawkjim:

Save your sales job salary, live minimally, save your bonuses, & come up with a business plan. Open up an arcade/brew house or something along the sorts. Build your business plan, crowd fund or see your local banker. Go for it.

This

#60 11 months ago

Follow your dream whatever it is and don’t listen to anyone that says it can’t be done.

#61 11 months ago
Quoted from Mistermoberg:

What I'm taking from this thread; learn how to fix games on my own to the point where it is second nature. That seems essential.

If you want to route games, this is the training you will need. The same goes for restoring pins. You won't be hiring anyone to help you.

Bottom line,
Learn - Give yourself some time to do this. Fortunately, at your age you have plenty of this! Read, read, read. Start with pinrepair.com and add some of vid1900 guides here on Pinside. Lots of help here - just ask!

Buy a couple of Pins - The best way to learn is to buy a Project Pin EM (Electro-mechanical) and a Project Pin SS (Solid State). You can still find these cheap. Learn by fixing them. I have been restoring pins for almost three years now and I am still tweaking my methods to end up with a better product so be patient and don't try to learn it all, all at once. Keep an eye on Craigslist and Facebook in your area. Ask here on Pinside. You should be able to buy an electro-mechanical needing work for $200 - $300. Solid States cost more but you should be able to find one in need of a lot of work for under $500. I recommend starting with a Bally or Williams single player EM from the 70s. These are the easiest to fix and lower the frustration level. A late 70s Bally or Williams pin is a good place to start with solid state pins. There is a lot of good information on the Internet about how to fix these pinballs.

Do it all - You will need to learn how to glue broken cabinets together, diagnose problems, read schematics, touch-up artwork, haul pins, buy the right parts and it goes on and on and on. If you want to start your own business then you will have to learn how to become a business person - the licenses you will need, how to track costs and income, taxes and what paperwork you need to keep. If you like specializing, you are not a good candidate for starting your own business.

Project Person - Do you enjoy working weeks or even months on a project? If not, restoring is not for you.

Test the Waters - There is no reason that you can't route a few games and/or restore some pinball machines. Most pinball operators need many games on route before they can actually make money. So if you only route a couple of games, you may actually be losing money.

Quoted from Mistermoberg:

Secondly, save more of my income than I already am.

Create a 'Learning Account' - You will need to invest in both time and money. These costs go into the 'Learning Account' column.

Keep your costs low - Do your own work. For example, I made my own coin box lids to save some money.

Follow Your Passion - If you love pinball, then you are on the right track. You will need another job to keep you afloat until you have the knowledge you need to make some money. And even then, you should consider that pinball will most likely be your second job.

Make your decision AFTER you gain some experience - After you have put some learning under your belt you will be much better able to determine where, if anywhere, you want to go in the pinball world.

I can tell you that as a 'restorer' I could only get less than $5.00 per hour for all of my hard work - and usually a LOT less than $5.00 per hour. Restoring pinball machines for sale to others is usually a 'Labor of Love.' I have decided to route the games that I have restored. That way I get to benefit from my hard work. I have started my own business routing pins. Will I make big bucks? I don't expect to make much money at all now. You can read about what it takes to become an operator here:

https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/a-pecos-diary-my-journey-to-pinball-operator

Some towns are more business friendly than others. Tucson is not one of them so the information you find there is more work and possibly more costs than other cities.

Quoted from Mistermoberg:

I also have limited artistic abilities.

So do I, but I have learned just enough to do some decent playfield restorations. It may take me two weeks to do a playfield restore and I don't consider it 'fun' but I am getting by.

Pinball is making a comeback. If I'm right, and it continues, you might be able to own your own arcade one day and actually make some money doing it. If I'm right, now is a good time to start learning. If I'm right, then this is a good time to get into the Pin Biz. If you REALLY love pinball, then FIND a way to scratch that itch and earn a few bucks on the side.

Those are just a few thoughts I have right now. I might have more later.

#62 11 months ago
Quoted from Dr-Willy:

owning a location where you keep 100 percent of the coin drop will have you taking home the most,

Ummmmmmmmmmm......................................... you also get 100% of the bills.

LTG : )

#63 11 months ago

Only a handful of ways to do it:

Repair technician
Operator
Retailer/Distributor.
Designer
Manufacturer

The latter is potentially the most lucrative, but the hardest to do. You can count the winners on one hand. Designer and technician require education and skills. Retailer/Distributor requires capital and sales skills. Operator requires capital, some skills (can't afford to pay a technician for everything), good judgment, good location.

I am operating on a hobby level and the break-even point on the equipment is years. Definitely operating at a loss. Maintenance, cleaning, repairs, parts, ugh. If I didn't love it and view it as a hobby I wouldn't be doing it. It would take a massive amount of equipment on location for it to replace my income and I don't think there are enough hours in the day to maintain that many pins all by myself. I think most real operators aren't operating pins exclusively.

#64 11 months ago

What ever you decide. Really do your homework so you have the best chance at your goals.

Pinball manufacturer - some have brought in investors.

Distributors - have many lines they carry, we see here on Pinside when a distributor adds a new line. And they handle non pinball stuff too.

Street operator - my state ( Minnesota ) has 23 operators state wide. Not that long ago there were a couple hundred in the Twin cities alone. See a pattern ?

Arcade - you need more than pinball.

Barcade - you need to be on the alcohol side to make money. ( You aren't old enough for licensing )

Designer, programmer, with only a limited number of new titles a year, a tough field to get into and make a living.

Best wishes on your future. I hope you find that spot that makes you happy and money.

LTG : )

#65 11 months ago

Being a freelance tech. is probably the most lucrative way to go about it. Location is important, being in a big city is a must!

#66 11 months ago
Quoted from Ronnie1114:

Being a freelance tech. is probably the most lucrative way to go about it. Location is important, being in a big city is a must!

And finding people willing to pay you is going to be the hard part.

People will spend $6K on a game. And don't want to spend $5 to fix it. Locations that have games don't pay much either, and being on call isn't fun and your travel costs eat up most. That's why techs burn out so quick.

LTG : )

#67 11 months ago

I admire this kid. Being smart enough to try to do what he enjoys for a living. Secondly for not being too egotistic in asking for advice. Good luck young man, you seem like a good egg, that will take you far.

#68 11 months ago

If you sell online, figure 35-45% taxes on your net profits (after subtracting materials, fees). That's combined federal + state + local + an additional 15.3% social security / medicare. Bottom line, taxes suck. Profits you *think* are being made, aren't actually the reality.

#69 11 months ago

I hear Benton WI is a nice place to live, low cost of living, small town atmosphere, and somebody there making pinballs that seems to need more minions... maybe I'll move there well, ok, maybe I'll just visit someday.

#70 11 months ago
Quoted from Mistermoberg:

I'm in a sales job, and in all fairness, I have nothing to complain about. I make a great living, my hours are reasonable, and I can make tournaments and events (pretty much) whenever I feel like. But...I want nothing more than to make pinball my living....What's the most profitable sector of the industry to get into? Selling games?

The edits above show what stood out to me. You should investigate being a staff sales rep for a coin-op manufacturer, or at least a distributor. In this field, there are distribs for the B2B (e.g., Betson) and B2C (e.g., Cointaker) channels. Based on your current degree of success, do you feel more confident selling to operators and arcades, or to people who have home game rooms? In either channel, you would have to sell games in general, not just pinball, but it would be a step in the right direction. Since you are based in Sturbridge, you can use the Pintastic New England show as a place to explore the potential. Consider visiting the IAAPA show (http://www.iaapa.org/expos/iaapa-attractions-expo/home) to see more about the B2B side. At IAAPA, you can meet many veteran sales people who always seem to stay employed, though factory reps have to change companies as public tastes change. You can explore this casually over time if your current sales role is for a non-conflicting product.

Summary: you can capitalize on your current experience, and you don't need to start your own business to do it.
.................David Marston

#71 11 months ago
Quoted from NorCalRealtor:

I think most real operators aren't operating pins exclusively.

I just got my South Park from an operator who said he doesn't make money on Pins, so that's why he sold it. Which is kinda interesting since South Park is apparently one of the better earners due to the theme from what I've read.

#72 11 months ago
Quoted from dmarston:

The edits above show what stood out to me. You should investigate being a staff sales rep for a coin-op manufacturer, or at least a distributor. In this field, there are distribs for the B2B (e.g., Betson) and B2C (e.g., Cointaker) channels. Based on your current degree of success, do you feel more confident selling to operators and arcades, or to people who have home game rooms? In either channel, you would have to sell games in general, not just pinball, but it would be a step in the right direction. Since you are based in Sturbridge, you can use the Pintastic New England show as a place to explore the potential. Consider visiting the IAAPA show (http://www.iaapa.org/expos/iaapa-attractions-expo/home) to see more about the B2B side. At IAAPA, you can meet many veteran sales people who always seem to stay employed, though factory reps have to change companies as public tastes change. You can explore this casually over time if your current sales role is for a non-conflicting product.
Summary: you can capitalize on your current experience, and you don't need to start your own business to do it.
.................David Marston

Good info. Betson sells to individuals as well. Pursued a Valley pool table with them, new and used, the new price was better than the alternative companies, even with state tax paid. They have an office in Canton MA. There was a guy there named Benson that I interfaced with. No relation to Betson and that was 2 years ago.

#73 11 months ago

Become a "Middleman". No stock, no liability but you make a small amount on each machine sold, repaired, traded.

#74 11 months ago

Have a hat full of little pieces of paper that has the names of several 30-40 year old movies on them.

Shake the hat around and reach in and pull out one of those pieces of paper.

Start a thread on a pinball forum saying you will soon be making a pinball machine themed after the movie on that particular piece of paper.

Then sit back and watch the money start pouring in.

#75 11 months ago

...Eric, you sound like a bright young man who is driven to succeed and I wish you all the best in your vision.
My opinion - keep your Pinball interest a hobby (too much of a good thing has its limitations) and focus on an occupational niche or marketable specialty. If you have no financial backing, and a desire to move out of your present situation and environment (with sacrifices, of course) consider this:
Prepare and study hard to take the ASVAB test. Score high, talk to a military recruiter, and select a specialized (and guaranteed) job which interests you and requires many, many months of intense schooling. Join the military. Surround yourself with peers who have similar goals and interests. Network yourself. Obtain specialized licensing, certifications, and attend any college class offered. Fulfill your service obligation (honorably, of course). With your acquired specialized skills and education, aggressively seek employment opportunities with a City, State or Federal municipality, as they generally prefer ex-military applicants. Through persistent motivation, drive and effort, work yourself up the ladder of specialized skills, duties and responsibilities. Work 25-30 years. Retire early, receive a handsome pension for life, and play Pinball when and wherever you choose.

#76 11 months ago

I love this hobby and half the time it feels like a second job...I can't imagine it also being my real job .

#77 11 months ago

get a wet basement

1 week later
#78 10 months ago

After a couple weeks consideration, I'm doing something I never thought I'd do - I'm enrolling in college. Starting at community college first, and will then transfer to get a four year degree. Most likely in business or finance, but may throw everyone for a curve, including myself and go for IT.

The college is actually next to the town I grew up in, it's nice to see familiar faces, and do familiar things. The region is so small, the director of admissions actually remembered me from two years ago, when I almost went there after leaving high school.

I plan on leaving my sales job at the end of the summer, or going part time if possible. I feel like I'm too young and wasting my youth working and driving as much as I do. I've done 11K miles since 2/27/18. One day I had recently; 9am in Nashua NH, 12pm in Worcester MA, 4pm in Warwick, RI, 7pm in Griswold, CT.

I'll be seeking to find a sales position closer to 9 to 5, preferably in an office, even if it means a little less money. It gets lonely on the road, especially when leads suck, and no money is getting made.

Pinball can't feasibly be my living, at this time anyways. Will I give up on that dream? Not yet.

Thanks to everyone who has replied in the thread, it truly was a small contributing factor to my decision, and I really appreciate everyone on this forum.

Cheers,

Eric

#79 10 months ago

There's really only one option here:

Gofundme and open a pinball museum!

#80 10 months ago
Quoted from Mistermoberg:

After a couple weeks consideration, I'm doing something I never thought I'd do - I'm enrolling in college. Starting at community college first, and will then transfer to get a four year degree. Most likely in business or finance, but may throw everyone for a curve, including myself and go for IT.
The college is actually next to the town I grew up in, it's nice to see familiar faces, and do familiar things. The region is so small, the director of admissions actually remembered me from two years ago, when I almost went there after leaving high school.
I plan on leaving my sales job at the end of the summer, or going part time if possible. I feel like I'm too young and wasting my youth working and driving as much as I do. I've done 11K miles since 2/27/18. One day I had recently; 9am in Nashua NH, 12pm in Worcester MA, 4pm in Warwick, RI, 7pm in Griswold, CT.
I'll be seeking to find a sales position closer to 9 to 5, preferably in an office, even if it means a little less money. It gets lonely on the road, especially when leads suck, and no money is getting made.
Pinball can't feasibly be my living, at this time anyways. Will I give up on that dream? Not yet.
Thanks to everyone who has replied in the thread, it truly was a small contributing factor to my decision, and I really appreciate everyone on this forum.
Cheers,
Eric

good move, get a degree and keep your options open.....good luck....

-1
#81 10 months ago

Fly out to Vegas and pick the brain of that dude who runs the pinball museum...

#82 10 months ago

Might be a little late but...

Careers teacher here:
Call up people in Stern, CGC, and any other pinball companies. Let them know your ambitions to work for their company and let them know you are going to university. Ask what they need most and what they need you to specialize in. Make sure they get your name and get their contact information. While in college, follow up with them and let them know that you are succeeding occasionally. Ask questions about what they want you to focus on in particular subjects. Give them a graduation date and bring your resume during your last semester.

#83 10 months ago

Sounds like you've got a good plan Eric.

I imagine most people who have made any money in pinball started off doing it as something on the side. Get a game or two, learn to work on them, put them out on location (or find some place like an office or a student union center). See where things go from there (while going to school and working on other stuff).

Better to find out how much you like working in pinball when it's a side gig and you have a good paying regular job.

#84 10 months ago
Quoted from Mistermoberg:

I'm enrolling in college.

Much better investment than pinball. Good luck to you!

Quoted from CrazyLevi:

There's really only one option here:
Gofundme and open a pinball museum!

Like this one? https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1166052659/atlanta-pinball-museum

#85 10 months ago

Good move, college is a great choice! Stick with it and always look at the light at the end of the tunnel. Short term pain for long term gain. The joys of pulling all nighters studying and eating 25 cent packs of ramen noodles for days on end in college and making tomato soup out of ketchup packets from McDonalds.

#86 10 months ago
Quoted from RandomGuyOffCL:

Fly out to Vegas and pick the brain of that dude who runs the pinball museum...

Oh, boy! That guy didn’t seem like the happiest guy in Vegas when I was there 2 months ago. You could try and pick his brain, if he stops long enough to even make eye contact. Dude went from one machine to another fixing stuff the whole time I was there, except for the brief yell at a kid who was running past the sign that said “no running”.

#87 10 months ago
Quoted from kevmad:

Good move, college is a great choice! Stick with it and always look at the light at the end of the tunnel. Short term pain for long term gain. The joys of pulling all nighters studying and eating 25 cent packs of ramen noodles for days on end in college and making tomato soup out of ketchup packets from McDonalds.

Another piece of advice...if you gonna take a risk on something that could be lucrative...do it as early in life as possible, before you have things of value that you could lose. Things like a house, a wife, kids, etc.....once those come along, things tighten up in a hurry and risky ventures are off the table

#88 10 months ago
Quoted from Mistermoberg:

After a couple weeks consideration, I'm doing something I never thought I'd do - I'm enrolling in college. Starting at community college first, and will then transfer to get a four year degree. Most likely in business or finance, but may throw everyone for a curve, including myself and go for IT.
The college is actually next to the town I grew up in, it's nice to see familiar faces, and do familiar things. The region is so small, the director of admissions actually remembered me from two years ago, when I almost went there after leaving high school.
I plan on leaving my sales job at the end of the summer, or going part time if possible. I feel like I'm too young and wasting my youth working and driving as much as I do. I've done 11K miles since 2/27/18. One day I had recently; 9am in Nashua NH, 12pm in Worcester MA, 4pm in Warwick, RI, 7pm in Griswold, CT.
I'll be seeking to find a sales position closer to 9 to 5, preferably in an office, even if it means a little less money. It gets lonely on the road, especially when leads suck, and no money is getting made.
Pinball can't feasibly be my living, at this time anyways. Will I give up on that dream? Not yet.
Thanks to everyone who has replied in the thread, it truly was a small contributing factor to my decision, and I really appreciate everyone on this forum.
Cheers,
Eric

Wise choice in the college plan, except this advice I wish someone gave me when I was college aged. Pick a community college that is properly accredited to transfer your credits to the school you will be going to get your degree next. Meaning it is a lot cheaper option to transfer the credits in and discount your 4 year degree at the more expensive college, by only having to go there 2 or 3 years, the first 1 or 2 paid for at community college prices. And you get your degree from the college you want to at the end of it. Takes some planning but a cheaper option for college with the same end result.

#89 10 months ago
Quoted from Mistermoberg:

After a couple weeks consideration, I'm doing something I never thought I'd do - I'm enrolling in college. Starting at community college first, and will then transfer to get a four year degree. Most likely in business or finance, but may throw everyone for a curve, including myself and go for IT.
The college is actually next to the town I grew up in, it's nice to see familiar faces, and do familiar things. The region is so small, the director of admissions actually remembered me from two years ago, when I almost went there after leaving high school.
I plan on leaving my sales job at the end of the summer, or going part time if possible. I feel like I'm too young and wasting my youth working and driving as much as I do. I've done 11K miles since 2/27/18. One day I had recently; 9am in Nashua NH, 12pm in Worcester MA, 4pm in Warwick, RI, 7pm in Griswold, CT.
I'll be seeking to find a sales position closer to 9 to 5, preferably in an office, even if it means a little less money. It gets lonely on the road, especially when leads suck, and no money is getting made.
Pinball can't feasibly be my living, at this time anyways. Will I give up on that dream? Not yet.
Thanks to everyone who has replied in the thread, it truly was a small contributing factor to my decision, and I really appreciate everyone on this forum.
Cheers,
Eric

Not a bad idea on the IT portion of things. I wish I would've gone that route years ago, but chose business instead. I've got a friend that lives in our neighborhood and literally started doing that at your age. Didn't even go to college. He just turned 51 and makes over $400k in salary per year now working from home majority of the time.

#90 10 months ago
Quoted from Mistermoberg:

After a couple weeks consideration, I'm doing something I never thought I'd do - I'm enrolling in college. Starting at community college first, and will then transfer to get a four year degree. Most likely in business or finance, but may throw everyone for a curve, including myself and go for IT.
The college is actually next to the town I grew up in, it's nice to see familiar faces, and do familiar things. The region is so small, the director of admissions actually remembered me from two years ago, when I almost went there after leaving high school.
I plan on leaving my sales job at the end of the summer, or going part time if possible. I feel like I'm too young and wasting my youth working and driving as much as I do. I've done 11K miles since 2/27/18. One day I had recently; 9am in Nashua NH, 12pm in Worcester MA, 4pm in Warwick, RI, 7pm in Griswold, CT.
I'll be seeking to find a sales position closer to 9 to 5, preferably in an office, even if it means a little less money. It gets lonely on the road, especially when leads suck, and no money is getting made.
Pinball can't feasibly be my living, at this time anyways. Will I give up on that dream? Not yet.
Thanks to everyone who has replied in the thread, it truly was a small contributing factor to my decision, and I really appreciate everyone on this forum.
Cheers,
Eric

You are correct, getting an education is the key that will open up doors in your future.

Being self employed is the "American Dream" and I think that's what you are looking for whether its pinball or whatever you are passionate about.

Find a need and fill it. If you do the hard work and research, money will come in. Sometimes in huge surges, often in a trickle.
But the money will flow.

Staying in business is the key. Its not for the faint hearted, in fact it can be terrifying at times.

Do not second guess yourself. As an entrepreneur you are always right if you have a clear vision of what you want to accomplish.

Finish what you start.

Good Luck.

#91 10 months ago
Quoted from Mistermoberg:

After a couple weeks consideration, I'm doing something I never thought I'd do - I'm enrolling in college. Starting at community college first, and will then transfer to get a four year degree. Most likely in business or finance, but may throw everyone for a curve, including myself and go for IT.
The college is actually next to the town I grew up in, it's nice to see familiar faces, and do familiar things. The region is so small, the director of admissions actually remembered me from two years ago, when I almost went there after leaving high school.
I plan on leaving my sales job at the end of the summer, or going part time if possible. I feel like I'm too young and wasting my youth working and driving as much as I do. I've done 11K miles since 2/27/18. One day I had recently; 9am in Nashua NH, 12pm in Worcester MA, 4pm in Warwick, RI, 7pm in Griswold, CT.
I'll be seeking to find a sales position closer to 9 to 5, preferably in an office, even if it means a little less money. It gets lonely on the road, especially when leads suck, and no money is getting made.
Pinball can't feasibly be my living, at this time anyways. Will I give up on that dream? Not yet.
Thanks to everyone who has replied in the thread, it truly was a small contributing factor to my decision, and I really appreciate everyone on this forum.
Cheers,
Eric

This is pretty much the most rational, logical, and sensible post I have read on Pinside. Good luck to you.

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