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(Topic ID: 278873)

How do YOU read your schematic?


By KYBingo

14 days ago



Topic Stats

  • 17 posts
  • 16 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 12 days ago by baldtwit
  • No one calls this topic a favorite

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    #1 14 days ago

    Here I am again setting up to knock some bugs out of my Laguna Beach. I will again be addressing the issue with multiple balls lifting...phew.

    As I set out the obvious tools, jump wires and multi-meter, I look at my schematic and wonder if the way I am looking at it is confusing me. I am not the best at reading the schematic and translating it to where things are on the machine. My machine is missing many labels. I have see multiple screen shots of schematics here in the forum and wonder is it easier to read, follow and understand if I just look at it on-line (on screen)? My schematic I had printed (2 x 6 feet) thinking my old eyes would be able to read it better. It is a little fuzzy in areas but the resolution is readable.

    Inputs and suggestions I will consider instructional.

    Thanks

    #2 14 days ago

    Printing the schematic with the best possible image is ideal, then use a magnifying glass if necessary.
    If you print it too big and it looks muddy, you are just going to be guessing more of the image and not actually looking at what was intended in the schematic.
    -Mike

    #3 14 days ago

    Printed, so I get the "big picture" - literally. Seated at a large table with good lighting helps too.

    #4 14 days ago

    I prefer to look at them on a computer. I can zoom in, scroll around, focus on one section. Then I go work on the machine, check some stuff, come back, and don't need to scan around a big piece of paper for where I left off.

    #5 14 days ago

    I print ‘normal size’ and at the same time use the online version to zoom in. Best of both worlds

    #6 14 days ago

    Here is a good write up some one did for aligning schematics with the actual circuit

    https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/em-pinball-circuits-basics-to-not-so-basic

    #7 14 days ago

    Get couple sheets 33 up mailing labels and a quality pen . Write needed details on label and attach ( fold over so seals to itself) to wire close to pj solenoid or whatever area you are working on . Also replace missing labels . Really helps if you do service work in spurts . Start something then shit happens and its awhile before you get back to the repair .

    Also handheld or desk magnifier with built in led lighting helpful .

    Best of luck! Shane

    #8 13 days ago

    If I am going to work on a machine, the first thing I do is take the schematic as published on Phil's site and convert it to a pdf file. I use Photoshop to do this, there must be other ways but that's how I do it. Once it's in that format, I can open it in Foxit Reader (free online) and make annotations and notes wherever necessary to remind me of what I've done, repair notes, descriptions of functions, etc. I have most of the bingo schematics in paper form but I rely more on the computer for the reasons noted, although I will have the schem open in the shop as well, just without notes scribbled everywhere.

    #9 13 days ago

    With my reading glasses on

    #10 13 days ago

    I'd much rather use a readable paper schematic than a PDF online. Too much moving the scan around on the computer screen looking how things interact, whereas on a paper schematic you can just follow the lines. As stated above, paper laid out on a large surface, under good light is the best for me.

    Sometimes the paper schematics don't work well....for instance, if they are actual blueprints, they tend to fade with age, or if they are blurry. In that case I opt for a clear scan PDF and spend the extra time and effort using the laptop.

    #11 13 days ago
    Quoted from JethroP:

    I'd much rather use a readable paper schematic than a PDF online. Too much moving the scan around on the computer screen looking how things interact, whereas on a paper schematic you can just follow the lines. As stated above, paper laid out on a large surface, under good light is the best for me.
    Sometimes the paper schematics don't work well....for instance, if they are actual blueprints, they tend to fade with age, or if they are blurry. In that case I opt for a clear scan PDF and spend the extra time and effort using the laptop.

    100 percent agree.

    #12 13 days ago

    Paper 100% for me, if possible. I did a lot of in-home repairs and having a way to read schematics without the need for an internet connection was priceless.
    While having a nice light at home is great, having repaired a bunch of machines in areas with little/no light, I quickly learned that having headlamps and backups for my backup lamps were more useful. There were still times when I struggled to read, but it was in someone's concrete bunker with no Internet and one hanging light with no shade. In the next room.

    Plus I find paper schematics much easier to interact with and read, and I do enough work on the computer as it stands.

    The big thing I miss when using a PDF is the ability to take a step back and review surrounding circuits without the need to zoom out and drag around. Maybe I'm easily distracted, but I can lose a train of thought pretty easily if the browser or other PDF viewer crashes or otherwise doesn't do the thing I wanted. Paper generally doesn't disappear while looking at it.

    And while I wipe my hands off or clean them if covered in grease before touching the mouse or trackpad or screen surface or whatever, I still don't want that junk on those interfaces. Can I work with a digital schematic? Sure. It just isn't as easy.

    Paper forever, if possible (for me).

    #13 13 days ago
    Quoted from EMsInKC:

    With my reading glasses on

    and or a magnifying glass, and usually with lots of cussing and frustration.

    #14 12 days ago

    I give it to my more adept brother and have him read it.

    #15 12 days ago

    For something like a bingo or EM I'll try to get original paper schematics.
    Then I make a copy, sometimes enlarging it. For my setup the best thing
    to do is set it on the pin next to the one I'm working on. I like to make notes
    for future reference on the copy. Need lotsa light and magnifier for these
    olde eyes.

    #16 12 days ago

    I usually stare blankly at them for at least 10 mins before my brain is able to decode them.

    I prefer the paper ones, but I don't always have a choice.

    #17 12 days ago

    if you want a bigger printed schematic, it's best to upscale and change the image size in a graphics program like gimp, photoshop, or similar and also start with the highest resolution scan you can find. Upscaling will create more pixels and smooth things at the expense of a larger file size.

    the images files on bingo.cdyn.com are all 300 DPI saved in the lossless png format. A pdf is typically downscaled to as little as 72 DPI and jpeg compressed. It will look badly pixelated with halo artifacts when printed at actual size and even worse if printed enlarged.

    if you print an schem from bingo.cdyn.com and it came out badly, let me know and I'll find out why. Could be something wrong with the image parameters.

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